Edvald Boasson Hagen clinches second Aviva Tour of Britain title

All images ©CyclingShorts.cc / wwwchrismaher.co.uk

Edvald Boasson Hagen of MTN Qhubeka became the first rider to win the modern Aviva Tour of Britain twice when he successfully defended his 13 second lead on the final stage, an 86.8km circuit race around some of central London’s iconic landmarks.

The Norwegian sprinted to fifth on the stage, which was upgraded to fourth when Andre Greipel was relegated for impeding Elia Viviani in the final sprint up Regent Street St James, handing the Italian his third stage win of the week.

Viviani’s victories in Wrexham, Floors Castle and now London also mean he is only the fifth rider to win three stages in one edition of the race, and joins Mark Cavendish as one of only two riders to win Tour of Britain stages in England, Scotland and Wales.

Speaking afterwards he said “After yesterday I saw I had good speed in the legs after a really hard week, so we thought we could win today. 

“(Ben) Swifty and Andy (Fenn) put me in a perfect position for the last corner. We saw the road go up and I knew we couldn’t start the sprint too early. When I saw Greipel go I went directly on his left-hand side. He came across a little bit, a little bit and that edged me towards the barriers. I’m disappointed because it is better to win without this. He is a big champion and I’ve never seen him do this before. But we won in London and that is the main thing.”

“This week has been really good with lots of stages over 200 kilometres,” he added. “It has given me a very good base for the worlds and I am really confident. I think the Tour of Britain is the perfect roads for the worlds this year.”

After the stage Greipel insisted the incident was accidental: “I didn’t see Viviani coming. I was just concentrating on my sprint and suddenly he was next to me. The final straight wasn’t that wide, I had to look for space to overtake. Everybody was on the limit on the final corner. I didn’t do anything for purpose that’s for sure. That’s sprinting.” 

Boasson Hagen’s fourth place on the day was more than enough to see him win the Aviva Yellow Jersey outright thirteen seconds ahead of Team Sky’s Wout Poels with young British rider Owain Doull capping an outstanding week’s work by moving up to third place overall thanks to a time bonus, the best result of his road career to date.

Doull also claimed the Chain Reaction Cycles Points jersey, having finished in the top ten on all but one stage (the finish at Hartside where he came 11th) and the Premier Inn Best British Rider award.

Boasson Hagen, who won three stages in 2008 and four in 2009, didn’t take a stage victory in 2015, but arguably his overall victory was all the more impressive, having to fight off a determined effort from Team Sky, working for the in-form Poels.

“I am very happy with that win,” said Boasson Hagen who joined MTN Qhubeka at the start of this season from Team Sky. “The object today was simply to defend the jersey and my team did a great job all day. Team WIGGINS took it out very fast at the start looking for the intermediate Sprint and seconds for their rider and it was very hard but then the race settled down a little. I always like to race to win. I had my chances with Sky but perhaps I get more chances with MTN Qhubeka. I think perhaps this year it was harder to win the GC than back in 2009, the course was tougher and Sky were very strong.”

Boasson Hagen now goes onto the World Championships in Richmond, Virginia where he will be riding primarily for Alexander Kristoff although on this form he clearly represents a viable Plan B. Both Greipel and Viviani have also expressed their hopes of taking the title and it could yet be that the Aviva Tour of Britain again acts as ideal build up for the eventual champion, as it did last year with Michel Kwiatkowski.

With a new look circuit hosting 14-laps of racing, the early interest in the final stage centred mainly on Team WIGGINS trying to secure two vital seconds for Doull to move him from fourth place onto the podium in third ahead of Rasmus Guldhammer of Cult Energy Pro Cycling.

For a team consisting of Great Britain’s best team pursuiters that was a pleasing scenario and provided a fine spectacle for a large crowd as Team WIGGINS went to the front half way around the first lap and bossed the race for the first three laps right up to the first intermediate YodelDirect Sprint.

A huge turn on lap three from Sir Bradley Wiggins set Doull up nicely although Russ Downing, riding for Cult Energy did manage to infiltrate the Team WIGGINS train and take the line honours to deny Doull the full three seconds. Doull, however, comfortably collected two seconds for second place to move into third on the road, a position he was able to defend.

After the first sprint an eight man break went up the road which meant Cult had to chase in an attempt to get Guldhammer into the second YodelDirect Sprint. Ultimately it was in vain with the peloton unable to get on terms in time, last year’s overall winner Dylan van Baarle taking both the second and third YodelDirect Sprints, on his way to finishing eighth overall.

Elsewhere Peter Williams of ONE Pro Cycling completed an excellent week’s riding – both individually and in the team context – by taking both the SKODA King of the Mountains title and YodelDirect Sprint jersey, only the third time that feat has ever been achieved in Aviva Tour of Britain history

Williams, from Southport, had cinched the Skoda King of the Mountains title on Saturday when he took maximum points on the final climb of the day up Brantham Hill in Suffolk and started today’s stage seven points up from Conor Dunne in the YodelDirect Sprints classification. With neither rider contesting the first sprint of the day Williams’ lead became unassailable and the celebrations could start.

“It’s a massive achievement for ONE Pro Cycling. This time last year it was just a few conversations and the ball had just started to role so it was a really new team. To come away with two leaders’ jerseys on our Tour debut is a brilliant achievement.

“I feel like I’ve been in good form all year, the setup is like nothing I’ve ever experienced before and it helps get the best out of all the riders. It’s a really good environment. Coming into the Tour of Britain we had prepared well and felt ready to come here and do something.”

For full results and standings, please click here.

How to: Buy a Cyclo-Cross Bike with Deniz Erkan

Deniz_Erkan_cyclist_mag

Photo courtesy of ©DenizErkan

During the excitement of GB’s Helen Wyman taking Bronze at the CX World Championships this weekend, I caught up with Deniz Erkan of Hadron Cycles on his tips to buying a cyclo-cross bike. So, what are you waiting for? Get out there, and get muddy!

First things first, set a budget, and stick to it.
You can buy a very good quality bike anywhere from £600 upwards. Between £800 and £1500 gets you a fantastic aluminum frame with high quality components, whilst upwards of £1500 can get a nice carbon frame and top end components. Decide how much you want to spend and get the best bike you can for the money.

Pick a frame material
Carbon is light, stiff and can be moulded into some very interesting shapes. However, it is more fragile, meaning an awkward crash into something hard can mean a new frame is required.

Aluminum technology has moved a long way since the earliest frames. These days you can get some really space age aluminum for very little money. It’s lighter than steel, and a lot stiffer too. It can also take a bit of punishment, so the odd crash is unlikely to destroy your pride and joy.

Steel frames are wonderfully resilient, forgiving to ride but a touch on the heavy side. There are some newer (more expensive) options like stainless steel which ride very well and are closing in on the weight of aluminum bikes, but generally good quality steel frames are heavier than other counterparts.

Titanium frames are expensive. It’s a difficult material to work with. However, they are wonderfully light, responsive and undeniably beautiful. They don’t need to be painted, and are very, very strong, meaning all but the worst of crashes are unlikely to even leave a scratch on your frame.

Component choice
Disc or cantilever? As a general rule, correctly set-up cantilever brakes are going to work just as well as poorly set up cable-actuated disc brakes. For modest budgets, don’t be afraid to go for cantilever brakes, as their stopping power is immense. If you are looking for disc brakes, then where possible, stretch to hydraulic models as these provide the full benefits of disc brake systems (minimal servicing, excellent modulation, unparalleled stopping power.) Cable driven disc systems still need cables replaced every now and then (more frequently on cross bikes) and carry the risk of cables snapping or snagging, rendering the brake useless. Some models are very good, such as the Avid BB7, however, given the choice I’d recommend an upgrade to hydraulics.

Tyres
Most new bikes sadly come with rubbish tyres. Factor in the intended use of your new cyclocross bike and set aside a budget for some good quality, puncture resistant and suitably constructed (size, tread depth, compound) tyres.

The Eastway CX2.0 in action. Photo courtesy of ©DenizErkan

The Eastway CX2.0 in action. Photo courtesy of ©DenizErkan

Groupset
A very personal thing, choose groupset based on ergonomics and usability. Shimano offers shims to adjust lever reach for small hands, whilst SRAMs levers are all independently reach adjustable, making exact, fine-tuned set up. Campagnolo offers something similar, but the ergonomics of having to use your thumb can be off putting for some people. Try each of them out and decide what you like using the most. It’s only really at the shifters where you’ll notice a discernible difference in each of the three brands. The rest is aesthetics and specification. SRAM is usually lighter for the money, whilst Campagnolo is almost always more expensive, and difficult to get hold of. Shimano is ubiquitous, priced in the middle and performs there too.

Pedals
Whilst its entirely possible to ride off road, on road pedals, if you want to get serious about the sport, you’ll need to invest in some MTB style pedals. The difference here is that the cleat (the part of the pedal system attached to your shoe) is a lot smaller than a typical road cleat, allowing it to fit in a recessed part of your shoe. This means the shoe can have plenty of tread and walking surface to get you through the mud safely, with the cleat free of the debris.

Shimano leads the way here with the best value for money in its SPD range of pedals. Alternatives include LOOK, TIME, Crankbrothers. Pick one based on price, weight and aesthetic. They all function in a very similar way.

Accesories
What else do you need to have fun on a cross bike?

Bright lights to light up the trail, spare tubes and a pump are a must, but CO2 inflators are a big bonus when you are cold, wet and just want to get home. Take a tyre boot too (piece of old tyre cut into 1-2 inch strip) for emergency tyre repairs, or buy a set of tyre boots like the Park TB-2. It’s always surprising how much an errant branch can damage even the finest rubber. Other than that, get out there and have fun!

 

Hadron CyclesHadron Cycles is a local bike shop based in Islington who aim to cater for all types of cyclists and run regular weekly rides. Contact them for help in buying you CX bike.

Hayley Davies

Hayley Davies

Writer

Riding since Feb 2011 Hayley is a 30 year old female who loves adventures. If she’s not on one of her many bikes or in the water on a bodyboard/surfboard, then Hayley is probably out looking for something new to keep the adrenaline pumping!
Website: www.hjdonline.co.uk

Champion Systems Maxgear announce Women’s 2013 Team

New riders Lauryn Theryn and Joanne Blakeley will join current riders Eve Dixon, Frankie White, Melissa Bury and Nicola Soden for the 2013 season.
Lauryn joins the team with a wealth of sporting experience and success. Athletics was her main sport up until the age of 20. She was a thrower who competed in the Javelin and Discus at World Youth Games and Commonwealth Games standard. She finished her athletics career in 2006 in order to focus on Bobsleigh where she competed for Great Britain on the Europa Cup Circuit, World Cup Circuit and at the World Championships. She finished Bobsleigh in 2008 ranked 6th in the World, the best result for a British Women’s team in over a decade.

Lauryn Theryn Bobsleigh

Lauryn took up cycling in 2011 after attending a talent transfer programme run by UK Sport called Girls 4 Gold. She joined the Cardiff Jif Cycling Cluband raced for them on the road and track winning Welsh National medals in both disciplines. During the winter she took up playing Rugby and was selected for the England 7’s Development Squad. 
After sustaining three serious injuries early in her rugby career she took up cycling again to keep fit. She moved to Manchester in April this year to work for British Cycling setting herself the goal of competing in the British Track Championships and won a silver medal in the Team Sprint.

Champion Systems Maxgear

Lauryn commented “I am really excited to be given the opportunity to race for a local team and am really looking forward to racing with the other girls. My goal for next season is to be a reliable rider who works hard for the team and isn’t afraid of pushing my own physical boundaries in order to rise to any challenge.”

Jo is relatively new to cycling after coming from a running background. She was shortlisted for the Girls 4 Gold programme along with Lauryn. She joins the team after a year of riding with local club Seamons CC in which she achieved a great deal. She won the TLI National Road Race Championship and has produced some solid top twenty placings in National Road Race Series Races. She is also a very strong time triallist with several wins and podium places and 5th at the National Hill Climb Championships this year.

Jo wants to build on her road racing experience next year and is “eager to start racing with and learning from my new team – who love cycling as much as me! I’m particularly excited about racing in Belgium with them next year and gaining more experience on the track and in other areas.”

Ian Bury, team manager, said “Lauryn has had a spectacular sporting career so far both on and off the bike. She is a very driven individual and has much to offer to the team with vast sporting experience and a strong team ethic. Jo is also an exciting new addition to the team with a lot of raw talent. She can do a strong time-trial and is super enthusiastic to work hard with the team. We are very excited about 2013.“

The team have worked well as a unit this year with top tens and podiums in the National Women’s Road Race Series, National Women’s Team Series and races in Belgium and Holland. There has also been top National Championship performances, with Nicola placing 10th in the National Scratch Race Championship, Melissa winning Rollapoluza National Championship and second in the Grass Track 800m National Championship and most recently hill climbs with Eve winning the National Junior Women’s title for the second year running.

2013 line up:
Eve Dixon
Frankie White
Joanne Blakeley
Lauryn Therin
Melissa Bury
Nicola Soden

Follow the riders progress at maxgearettes.blogspot.com or on twitter @Maxgearettes

Pictures kindly supplied by Ed Rollason: www.edrollasonphotography.co.uk

 

 

“Like a virgin, track for the very first time”

Must learn to smile next time (and breathe!) ©Korneel Wever

Track cycling has always been a favourite of mine. To watch that is. The anticipation of the cyclists lining up on the track, skin-tight lycra and a face full of determination and concentration, the whirring sound of the wheels spinning at 60kmph+ on a banked wooden track; the creaking boards going un-noticed under the sound of excitement.  There has however, always been that little ‘voice’ inside, whispering at me with excitement at watching the pros do what they do best ‘you should do this Hayley, you’d love it!’. As a spectator though, the thought of taking the leap from a comfortable seat in the grandstand to the saddle of a track bike is daunting. But, I remind myself that I am Hayley *fearless* Davies, and I can do this!

Technically I had 9 months to prepare myself for my first experience, having had to cancel my initial session last January due to injury. Taking a leap of faith however, means committing, and so I booked myself on to the first ‘basic training’ session of the 2012/13 season at Amsterdam Velodrome.

Besides excited anticipation starting to form, small niggles of doubt were also playing on my mind in the weeks running up to the session; ‘what happens if I don’t enjoy it’ – counting on this experience to transform me from an average roady to a hooked-tracky; ‘do I have the power and speed it takes… let alone the lung capacity to get me through it?’  But, having built a network of track cycling friends around me, they yet again assured me in knowing my passion for speed; I am not only capable, but I will love it too. If they have faith in me, then I can have faith in me too!

Feeling confident! © Korneel Wever

With 3 indoor tracks throughout the Netherlands; the same number you’ll find in the whole of England and Wales, you could say we’re pretty lucky. When I moved to Holland 2 years ago, I jumped at the opportunity to watch the World Championships in Apledoorn, my first experience at seeing the events live. However, nothing can prepare you for the moment you are stood on the edge of the 200m track, overshadowed by the 47 degree banking; steeper than an average track of 250m – ‘oh my god! I can’t ride on that!’. Shutting the thoughts out, I get down to finding a bike (small enough) and circling the centre court ‘don’t forget you can’t free wheel. And you may find it easier to grab the side to clip in/out’ shouts the instructor. ‘Oh god. The banking is nothing. I have to clip in and out when stopped?!’ But, much to my delight, as seen on my face here, this bike is pretty comfy, and after completing a couple of event-free laps, I feel in control. I am ready!

The instructors gather us on the track and talk us through (in both Dutch and English, happily accommodating our expat needs!) a series of skill exercises from cruising the concrete, getting comfortable in the Cote d’Azur (the blue strip), and slowly coaxing us up onto the boards and around a set of cones set out and slowly moved up until we’re right up at the barriers on the top straight banking; all while looking around and becoming aware of the other rides on the track.  Wow, that’s a lot of things to think about! Of course, I have a minor panic attack when a rider in front slows suddenly as I climb the boards, letting out a little squeak (much to the delight of my friends who happened to be sat on the barriers at that exact point); but, I control it and carry on… this isn’t so bad!

Happy with our track-maneuvering skills, we move on to the fast-flying laps. The part, to be honest, I was most nervous about. Split into two groups of 8; the first group is lead out by an instructor and told to build their speed to a minimum of 35kmph, the speed at which you have enough momentum to hug the boards through the banked corners. ‘What you won’t know’ the instructor starts, pointing out the lack of speedo, ‘is if you are actually at your optimum speed. You just have to go for it’. Thankfully, I was in the second group which gave me the opportunity to watch what the other riders were doing; and what they shouldn’t be doing!

Then comes our turn. With a deep breath, I push off from the side, behind 4 other cyclists and the instructor on my wheel. We build the speed to what must have been a comfortable 35kmph, until we’re riding in the ‘sprinters line’ – between the black and the red. Within the first fast lap I find myself gaining on the cyclist in front of me– ‘Over take Hayley!’ I hear from behind. Over take?! Is he mad?! That requires going higher… ‘OVER TAKE HAYLEY! DO IT NOW, BUILD YOUR SPEED’. OMG ‘I can’t do it’ I shout back ‘YES YOU CAN! DO IT NOW!”. That’s it, I’m going. I push through the pedals building my speed with power I didn’t know I have, take a quick glance behind and the next thing I know I’m up beyond the blue line, passing the 4 other cyclists that were in front of me, with the cool wind brushing against my skin. OH MY GOD!!! I’M FLYING! THIS IS AMAZING.

I don’t know whether I am holding my breath or if I am over come with adrenaline, but the room is spinning. I slow my speed and head back down to the Cote d’Azur, but after only one recovery lap, I’m back up and flying around again before the whistle is blown for us to gather back at the centre. The instructor gives us a couple of words of advice; to me ‘don’t build or break your speed so fast, other cyclists around you may not be able to respond’. Got it. We’re soon back on the track, riding in two groups, wheel to wheel until the final whistle is blown. Two and a half hours, over so soon? I was only just getting started!

Many say track cycling, regardless of whether it’s your first go, or your 10th go, is addictive. They’re not wrong! Speaking with the instructors after the session, I’m approved to move up into the ‘introduction level’. Not five minutes at home and I’m logged on to the website booking myself in for next Sunday’s session. My track cycling experience; to be continued….!
**********

Basic introduction clinics are held at Amsterdam Velodrome on Sundays throughout September – March and include a 2.5 hour skill session with qualified trainers. Bike, shoes and helmet hire are also available starting from 11 Euros for the session.

Hayley Davies

Hayley Davies

Writer

Riding since Feb 2011 Hayley is a 30 year old female who loves adventures. If she’s not on one of her many bikes or in the water on a bodyboard/surfboard, then Hayley is probably out looking for something new to keep the adrenaline pumping!
Website: www.hjdonline.co.uk

Jody Cundy to Ride for Bronze

Jody Cundy will ride for bronze in the Men’s C4 4km Pursuit Finals this afternoon after qualifying third with a new personal best time of 4:42.005.

After being denied the chance to ride in the 1km Time Trial yesterday, Jody was determined to give it his all on the track today and vowed to show his fans what he could really do.

He was cheered on by the fiercely patriotic crowd who were relieved to see the 33 year old looking focussed and putting in maximum effort to get away from the starting block cleanly. Jody had a phenomenal ride in an even that he has not previously competed in at the Paralympics. He’ll be hoping to take bronze in the 4km Pursuit final tonight as he did at the World Championships in LA earlier this year.

UCI 2012 Track World Cup London Image Gallery

 

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Click SL (slideshow) or FS (fullscreen)

London UCI Track Cycling World Cup Gallery
Images ©Copyright John Allen Words by Anna Magrath.

It appears the Olympic Test Event; the UCI Track World Cup Final Round was a great success. There were supposedly minor grumbles from cyclists track centre who would have preferred not to have to trek so far for toilet facilities but everything else seems to have had the thumbs up. It seems the venue has been embraced by the majority of the cycling community in attendance. The track and closely controlled temperature seem to have enabled the athletes to achieve some very fast times with a number of new world records being set.

Team GB came out fighting providing a haul of medals and encouragingly for Team GB they are in areas that will count come the London Olympics. The international cyclists seemed to treat the event as a mini Olympics or World Championships. The times are looking very close amongst the top teams. In the men’s sprinting the German team looked to have breadth and depth, the French and Australian’s too were looking on course for a peak later in the season. The Women’s GB endurance riders seem to be on top form with only minor tinkering needed before the major events of the season. The Men’s endurance team look like they need a little more work but they had a great result (taking silver) with admittedly less time than they would have liked to train together, but they will no doubt be addressing that in the coming months. They seemed very relaxed and happy with their performance so I think we can expect more.

I can’t wait to see the cream of the worlds track cyclists battle it out in Australia for the World Championships, it’s going to be a wonderful summer of competitive cycling. Track cycling is in rude health and it’s a great example to other sports particularly for the camaraderie and respect between teams.
Bring on the World Champs!
 
 
RESULTS
 
MEN’S TEAM PURSUIT
1 AUS Australia 3:54.615
BOBRIDGE Jack
DENNIS Rohan
EDMONDSON Alexander
HEPBURN Michael
2 GBR Great Britain 3:56.330
BURKE Steven
CLANCY Edward
KENNAUGH Peter
THOMAS Geraint
3 NZL New Zealand 3:59.242
BEWLEY Sam
GATE Aaron
GOUGH Westley
RYAN Marc
4 BEL Belgium
DE POORTERE Ingmar
CORNU Dominique
DE KETELE Kenny
DUFRASNE Jonathan
5 RUS Russia
6 NED Netherlands
7 COL Colombia
8 LOK LOKOSPHINX
9 CHI Chile
10 DEN Denmark
 
Final World Cup Standings
1 AUSTRALIA AUS 42pts
2 NEW ZEALAND NZL 28pts
3 RUSVELO RVL 24pts
4 GREAT BRITAIN GBR 17pts
5 BELGIUM BEL 17pts
6 DENMARK DEN 16pts
7 NETHERLANDS NED 16pts
8 GERMANY GER 14pts
9 COLOMBIA COL 11pts
10 LOKOSPHINX LOK 11pts
 
MEN’S SPRINT
200m TT
1 HOY Chris GBR 9.932
2 SIREAU Kevin FRA 10.026
3 LEVY Maximilian GER 10.096
4 FÖRSTEMANN Robert GER 10.144
5 NJISANE Phillip TRI 10.148
6 KENNY Jason GBR 10.153
7 PERKINS Shane AUS 10.162
8 BAUGE Gregory FRA 10.217
9 BOTTICHER Stefan ERD 10.218
10 CRAMPTON Matthew SKY 10.234
11 SUNDERLAND Scott AUS 10.250
12 WATANABE Kazunari JPN 10.257
13 DAWKINS Edward NZL 10.272
14 ZHANG Miao CHN 10.277
15 PUERTA ZAPATA Fabian Hernando COL 10.278
16 NAKAGAWA Seiichiro JPN 10.279
 
1/8 Finals
Heat 1
1 HOY Chris GBR 10.526
2 NAKAGAWA Seiichiro JPN
Heat 2
1 SIREAU Kevin FRA 10.466
2 PUERTA ZAPATA Fabian Hernando COL
Heat 3
1 LEVY Maximilian GER 10.685
2 ZHANG Miao CHN
Heat 4
1 FÖRSTEMANN Robert GER 10.695
2 DAWKINS Edward NZL
Heat 5
1 WATANABE Kazunari JPN 10.538
2 NJISANE Phillip TRI
Heat 6
1 KENNY Jason GBR 10.476
2 SUNDERLAND Scott AUS
Heat 7
1 CRAMPTON Matthew SKY 11.517
2 PERKINS Shane AUS REL
Heat 8
1 BAUGE Gregory FRA 10.577
2 BOTTICHER Stefan ERD
 
5th to 8th Final
5 KENNY Jason GBR 10.848
6 CRAMPTON Matthew SKY
7 WATANABE Kazunari JPN
8 BAUGE Gregory FRA
 
1/4 Finals
Heat 1 HOY Chris GBR beat BAUGE Gregory FRA 2-1
Heat 2 SIREAU Kevin FRA beat CRAMPTON Matthew SKY 2-0
Heat 3 LEVY Maximilian GER beat KENNY Jason GBR 2-0
Heat 4 FÖRSTEMANN Robert GER beat WATANABE Kazunari JPN 2-0
Semi Finals
Semi 1 HOY Chris GBR 10.293 beats FÖRSTEMANN Robert GER 2-0
Semi 2 LEVY Maximilian GER beats SIREAU Kevin FRA 2-0
Finals
GOLD HOY Chris GBR beats LEVY Maximillian 2-0
BRONZE FORSTEMANN Robert GER beat SIREAU Kevin FRA 2-1
 
Final World Cup Standings
1 HOY Chris SKY 24pts
2 LEVY Maximilian GER 20pts
3 DMITRIEV Denis MTT 18pts
4 FORSTEMANN Robert ERD 15pts
5 NJISANE Phillip TRI 14pts
6 CONORD Charlie FRA 12pts
7 BOTTICHER Stefan ERD 12pts
8 SIREAU Kevin FRA 12pts
9 ZHANG Lei CHN 10pts
10 ENDERS Rene GER 9pts
11 CRAMPTON Matthew GBR 9pts
16 KENNY Jason GBR 7pts
 
WOMEN’S KEIRIN
1st Round (first rider to 1/4 finals, rest to repechage)
Heat 1

1 KRUPECKAITE Simona LTU
2 MCCULLOCH Kaarle AUS
3 PENDLETON Victoria GBR
4 BREZHNIVA Elena PHL
5 HIJGENAAR Yvonne NED
6 LEE Eunji KOR
7 DIEZ Alba CAT
Heat 2
1 JUNHONG Lin GPC
2 GNIDENKO Ekaterina PHL
3 CASAS ROIGE Helena ESP
4 MUSTAPA Fatehah YSD
5 HANSEN Natasha NZL
6 VILERA Mariesthela VEN
7 ALANGO Monika EST
Heat 3
1 VOGEL Kristina GER
2 JANKUTE Gabriele LTU
3 GAVIRIA RENDON Juliana COL
4 MEARES Anna AUS
5 VOYNOVA Anastasiya RUS
6 KANIS Willy NED
7 EL BUSTO ARTEAGA Ainara NAV
Heat 4
1 VARNISH Jess GBR
2 LARREAL Daniela VEN
3 GODBY Madalyn USA
4 WELTE Miriam GER
5 ISHII Hiroko JPN
6 STRELTSOVA Olga MTT
7 DYLKO Alena BLR
Heat 5
1 SANCHEZ Clara FRA
2 ZHONG Tianshi GPC
3 GUERRA RODRIGUEZ Lisandra CUB
4 LOHVINAVA Maryia BLR
5 WALKER Cristin USA
6 HUANG Ting Ying TPE
Heat 6
1 LEE Wai Sze HKG
2 GUO Shuang CHN
3 LEE Hyejin KOR
4 BARANOVA Viktoria RUS
5 CALVO BARBERO Tania ESP
6 SCHOFIELD Katie NZL
1st Round Repechage (first two progress to 1/4 final)
Heat 1
1 SULLIVAN Monique CAN
2 KANIS Willy NED
3 MCCULLOCH Kaarle AUS
4 LEE Hyejin KOR
5 LOHVINAVA Maryia BLR
6 ISHII Hiroko JPN
Heat 2
1 PENDLETON Victoria GBR
2 SHULIKA Lyubov UKR
3 BARANOVA Viktoria RUS
4 WALKER Cristin USA
5 STRELTSOVA Olga MTT
6 GNIDENKO Ekaterina PHL
7 EL BUSTO ARTEAGA Ainara NAV
Heat 3
1 CALVO BARBERO Tania ESP
2 JANKUTE Gabriele LTU
3 BREZHNIVA Elena PHL
4 CASAS ROIGE Helena ESP
5 HUANG Ting Ying TPE
6 MAEDA Kayono JPN
7 DYLKO Alena BLR
Heat 4
1 LARREAL Daniela VEN
2 SCHOFIELD Katie NZL
3 RIBEIRO Sumaia BRA
4 MUSTAPA Fatehah YSD
5 HIJGENAAR Yvonne NED
6 GAVIRIA RENDON Juliana COL
Heat 5
1 MEARES Anna AUS
2 ZHONG Tianshi GPC
3 HANSEN Natasha NZL
4 GARCIA Diana Maria COL
5 LEE Eunji KOR
6 GODBY Madalyn USA
Heat 6
1 GUO Shuang CHN
2 GUERRA RODRIGUEZ Lisandra CUB
3 WELTE Miriam GER
4 VILERA Mariesthela VEN
5 VOYNOVA Anastasiya RUS
6 DIEZ Alba CAT
1/4 Finals (first two to semis, rest to 1/4 final repechage)
Heat 1
1 SHULIKA Lyubov UKR
2 MEARES Anna AUS
3 KRUPECKAITE Simona LTU
4 KANIS Willy NED
5 CLAIR Sandie FRA
6 GUO Shuang CHN
7 212 LEE Wai Sze HKG
Heat 2
1 SANCHEZ Clara FRA
2 SULLIVAN Monique CAN
3 GUERRA RODRIGUEZ Lisandra CUB
4 JUNHONG Lin GPC
5 JANKUTE Gabriele LTU
6 LARREAL Daniela VEN
Heat 3
1 PENDLETON Victoria GBR
2 VARNISH Jess GBR
3 SCHOFIELD Katie NZL
4 ZHONG Tianshi GPC
5 VOGEL Kristina GER REL
CALVO BARBERO Tania ESP DNS
 
Semi Finals
Heat 1
1 SHULIKA Lyubov UKR
2 GUO Shuang CHN
3 KRUPECKAITE Simona LTU
4 VARNISH Jess GBR
5 SULLIVAN Monique CAN
6 JUNHONG Lin GPC
Heat 2
1 PENDLETON Victoria GBR
2 MEARES Anna AUS
3 LEE Wai Sze HKG
4 SANCHEZ Clara FRA
5 CLAIR Sandie FRA
6 KANIS Willy NED
 
Finals
Final 1-6
1 KRUPECKAITE Simona LTU
2 LEE Wai Sze HKG
3 GUO Shuang CHN
4 SHULIKA Lyubov UKR
5 PENDLETON Victoria GBR
6 MEARES Anna AUS
Final 7-12
7 SANCHEZ Clara FRA
8 JUNHONG Lin GPC
9 KANIS Willy NED
10 CLAIR Sandie FRA
11 SULLIVAN Monique CAN
12 VARNISH Jess GBR
 
Final World Cup Standings
1 KRUPECKAITE Simona LTU 38pts
2 GNIDENKO Ekaterina RUS 21pts
3 SHULIKA Lyubov UKR 21pts
4 GUO Shuang CHN 20pts
5 VOGEL Kristina GER 20pts
6 SANCHEZ Clara FRA 16pts
7 LEE Wai Sze HKG 10pts
8 MEARES Anna AUS 10pts
9 LARREAL Daniela VEN 8pts
10 CUEFF Virginie FRA 8pts
11 PENDLETON Victoria GBR 6pts
25 JAMES Rebecca GBR 2pts
 
WOMEN’S OMNIUM
Individual Pursuit
1 WHITTEN Tara CAN 3:31.604
2 TROTT Laura GBR 3:35.388
3 HAMMER Sarah USA 3:38.553
4 WILD Kirsten NED 3:40.992
5 EDMONDSON Annette AUS 3:41.357
6 GALYUK Svitlana UKR 3:41.536
7 KIESANOWSKI Joanne NZL 3:41.887
8 SHARAKOVA Tatsiana BLR 3:41.973
9 HUANG Li CHN 3:42.970
10 OLABERRIA DORRONSORO Leire ESP 3:43.586
 
Omnium Scratch
1 SHARAKOVA Tatsiana BLR
2 HAMMER Sarah USA -1lap
3 HUANG Li CHN -1lap
4 D’HOORE Jolien BEL -1lap
5 KIESANOWSKI Joanne NZL -1lap
6 EDMONDSON Annette AUS -1lap
7 WILD Kirsten NED -1lap
8 JEULAND Pascale FRA -1lap
9 TROTT Laura GBR -1lap
10 ROMANYUTA Evgenia RVL -1lap
 
500m TT
1 TROTT Laura GBR 35.642
2 SHARAKOVA Tatsiana BLR 35.645
3 EDMONDSON Annette AUS 35.718
4 WHITTEN Tara CAN 35.805
5 HAMMER Sarah USA 36.288
6 TREBAITE Ausrine LTU 36.420
7 LEE Min Hye KOR 36.579
8 HUANG Li CHN 36.583
9 D’HOORE Jolien BEL 36.638
10 KIESANOWSKI Joanne NZL 36.752
 
Final Omnium Standings
GOLD HAMMER Sarah USA 30pts
SILVER EDMONDSON Annette AUS 30pts
BRONZE TROTT Laura GBR 32pts
4 WHITTEN Tara CAN 34pts
5 SHARAKOVA Tatsiana BLR 41pts
6 WILD Kirsten NED 45pts
7 HUANG Li CHN 55pts
8 TREBAITE Ausrine LTU 57pts
9 D’HOORE Jolien BEL 58pts
10 KIESANOWSKI Joanne NZL 62pts
 
Final World Cup Standings
1 HUANG Li CHN 28pts
2 HAMMER Sarah USA 24pts
3 ROMANYUTA Evgeniya RVL 24pts
4 WHITTEN Tara CAN 17pts
5 TROTT Laura GBR 16pts
6 TREBAITE Ausrine LTU 15pts
7 WOJTYRA Malgorzata POL 12pts
8 WILD Kirsten NED 11pts
9 EDMONDSON Annette AUS 10pts
10 KING Dani GBR 10pts

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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