Introducing The Racing Chance Foundation

PRESS RELEASE

racing_Chance

The Racing Chance Foundation 

The growth in women’s cycling over the last few years has been phenomenal however there is still no clear structure in place for women who want to start competing and progress up the ranks.  No-one can deny that there is now more television coverage of women’s cycling thanks to events such as the Johnson’s Health Tech Grand Prix Series and now The Women’s Tour, but there is no clear pathway for women who aspire to compete in such events.

Until now.

Heather Bamforth talks through bike set up with riders.

Heather Bamforth talks through bike set up with riders.

The Racing Chance Foundation is a Charitable Incorporated Organisation so it has to remain transparent.  It has been registered as a charity with the Charity Commission (charity number 1156835) and has four trustees – Heather Bamforth, Alan Gornall, Colin Batchelor and Carley Brierley.  The charity’s intention is to provide a performance pathway for female cyclists in the UK who currently fall outside the existing track-based national programmes.  As such, the focus for the Foundation (for the time being at least) will be based on the road. Membership of the Racing Chance Foundation costs just £5 per year and gives cyclists exclusive access to races, events, a club shop, and a wealth of cycling knowledge & information.

The Foundation is currently developing sessions for all levels, from novice to elite, to help those riders who wish to develop their competitive cycling careers, with the first sessions planned for January 2015.  The aim is to provide assistance to riders by offering sessions that they can attend which will help develop their skills as competitive cyclists.  In addition, rather than providing grants to specific riders, one of the Foundation’s ultimate ambitions is to invite riders (at both a development and elite level) to compete in races as the Racing Chance Foundation, both in the UK and abroad, which will be funded by the Foundation.

We will be releasing details shortly regarding criteria for our elite and development squads.  What we can say in advance is that there won’t be a minimum number of licence points as a requirement.

The Foundation is affiliated to British Cycling and Cycling Time Trials and club membership is available to anybody (male or female) over the age of 16 (with parent/guardian permission if under the age of 18).  We don’t believe in solely trying to attract female membership; indeed the first races that we are organising in 2015 are two men’s events on the tough Bole Hill circuit in the Peak District.

RCF Kit by BioracerAs charity, the Racing Chance Foundation relies on donations to keep it going. They already have kit designed by Bioracer which is available to order, with profits going into the charity and, once established, RCF hope to be able to sell branded items in their online shop.  If you feel that you may be able to assist with the Foundation by supplying branded items, please email: [email protected]

The Trustees would like to thank Andrew Middleton of Towns Needham LLP for his invaluable assistance in registering the Foundation with the Charity Commission and Anna Magrath of Cycling Shorts for her assistance with the design and maintenace of the Foundation’s website and media management.

Further information can be found at the Foundation’s website (which is still partly in development): www.racingchancefoundation.com or by following them on Twitter and Facebook.

For press & media enquiries please contact: [email protected]

 

 

Beet It Sports Bars Review

Beet It

Beet it Sports Bars

This time last year I had the privilege to test Beet It Shots and wrote quite an in-depth review and report about the product and the impact 0.4g Nitrate has on sports performance. This year I have had the privilege to test Beet It pro-elite Beetroot and oat flapjack.

For those who do not know much about the idea of using Beetroot as a super food then I recommend reading my previous review but in a nut shell.

Research has shown the the consumption of 0.4g of Nitrate prior to taking part in a sport significantly boosts your performance.

The science: beet nitrates are converted into nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is a signalling agent that causes vasodilation, a widening of the blood vessels. Wider blood vessels equal increased blood flow. Better blood flow means more stamina and improved oxygen usage, leading to a 15%ish boost in performance.

But beetroot products are not just for endurance athletes, a lot of the famous beet root juice users like Mo Farah are distance aerobic-energy-based athletes.  Additionally, the majority of studies have been performed on runners, swimmers, rowers and cyclists. On the surface, the science behind beet root juice seems like it only provides a simple aerobic/endurance boost.

Beet juice-derived nitric oxide works so well it has been used in the Olympics as a supplement by endurance athletes for years now. No wonder this preconception is so pervasive. However, improved oxygen usage can be a boost to any athlete.

Nitric oxide is able to temporarily bolster the aerobic/oxidative system and helps traditionally non-aerobic, non-endurance athletes recover faster, even if they aren’t participating in a long-distance, endurance-based activities because the body draws its ability to regenerate energy from that system.

Therefore, if you’re an olympic athlete or a recreational sports person, you can benefit from beet root juice products.Beet It Sports Bar

This has certainly been born out this summer from my experience in the heat of riding in the Vendee. Beet It sports bars are easily digested and taste much nicer then the shots, with the added bonus that they contain slow releasing oats for addition food supply while riding.

I followed a simple regime, eat a bar 1 hour before riding and I also tested a second bar towards the end of rides over 2/3 hours. I did not start using the product until I had built up some miles in my legs and I had that ever present thigh burn at the start of rides.

The most instantly noticeable affect of the Nitrate is the lack of thigh burn at the start of rides and the ability to ride longer before fatigue begins to set in. Which is pretty much the same finding as last year so the delivery system does not affect the absorption and performance of the product.

What was new for this year was the consumption of a second bar on longer rides, while this did not necessary boost performance further but it did have a more noticeable effect on day two. Riding out on day two I did not have the expected heavy legs but it was as if I had had another bar that morning. So now my routine is to have a second bar post long ride to aid recovery.

I really can not recommend this product highly enough, it is the best sports nutrition product I have ever used, and I have used a few, it is way better then any gel, protein carb mix you can buy and to be honest is the only thing other than a zero calorie electrolyte that I will ever use.

jerseyBeetitBarsReviewRatingIf I was Victor Kiam I would buy the company the product is that good. Beet It pro-elite beetroot and oat flapjacks are a must.

I’d give it 110% but my editor tells me I have to cap my enthusiasm at 100% they are a CyclingShorts.cc star buy!

RRP: £25.00 for a case of 15 bars

Pendle Tandem Carrier Roof Rack Reviewed

Earlier this year my wonderful wife surprised me with a Tandem for our 25th Wedding anniversary, which does fit in the back of our people carrier however does not allow us to have anyone else in the car, which would be a bit of a problem when we head to France for our family summer holiday. The solution a tandem roof rack, but which one?

If I am honest I have never really been a fan of bike racks that clamp onto the frame, they often scuffPendle Tandem Roof Rack or damage the tube they clamp to and the the thought of only one clamp point with a Tandem did not appeal.

I scoured the marketplace and came up with three main options but the cost of two of the choices really ruled them out, so I finally plumped for the Pendle Tandem Carrier with front fork clamp. It also meant that I would be supporting a British Engineering firm, in my eyes a big bonus.

The prices direct from Pendle where not great so I placed an order via www.roofbox.co.uk a company I have used over the years to buy roof rack items at very reasonable prices and that was certainly true of the Pendle Rack.

I eagerly awaited the arrival of the bike rack, almost like an expectant father. Roofbox did not let me down, rapid delivery to my place of work in plenty of time for my test run for the Great Manchester Cycle a few weeks before our holiday.

The weekend before the ride I decided to fit the rack to our roof bars, as we no longer live in the 70’s flat pack world of missing parts and several trips backwards and forwards for missing screws and nuts, I assumed I did not need to go through the check list provided with the rack. How wrong could I be!!

I quickly and easily assembled the main part of the rack body and got it in place to clamp to the roof bars, but wait there is something missing. No maybe I missed them in the shrink wrapped packaging, surely the bottom plates for clamping to the roof bars are still in the box. After several minutes of vigourusly shaking the box nothing, they where missing, unbelievable! A quick email to Pendle to ask for the parts job sorted, but no joy ‘please contact supplier’. Ok fair enough but surely they will only contact Pendle etc etc. A quick call to Roofbox and a very helpful customer service assistant kept me on hold while she rang Pendle and got the parts shipped directly to me  (Roofbox 10, Pendle 0!).

The parts arrived the following day and I fitted the rack to the roof bars, but wait I am two bolts short! A quick hunt through my own spares box and two suitable bolts later rack fitted and set up in time for the Great Manchester Ride.

I contacted Pendle direct about the missing bolts and the over all initial lack of service. I did get an email back from one of the directors offering me bolts but to be fair it was sorted. I really wanted to point out that we are no longer in the era of parts falling off cars and missing bits from self assembly furniture, and that it might be an idea to actually do some quality control on final packaging.

On a positive note the rack does do what is says on the tin and works really well holding the tandem in place very securely, which is all it needs to do. (Pendle 10 out of 10 for functionality). It is not perhaps the most aesthetically pleasing item and maybe not of the highest quality for chroming and powder coating but that does not matter too much.

When we arrived in France I noticed another family with a Pendle rack and asked if they had any problems with supply. They too had bought from Roofbox with excellent service, and yes they too had parts missing for the bike rack, you’ve guessed it bottom plate and bolts. Hmm looks like mine is not an isolated instance. Come on Pendle! Nelson, Lancashire is surely not languishing 30 years behind us all, get your quality control sorted!

jerseyRatingPendleTandemRackFunctionality 90%

Quality of Service/ Customer service attitude (Pendle) 10%

Quality of Service/ Customer service attitude Roofbox 100%

I would recommend Roofbox for bike rack and roof bar supplies, but I might just pay the extra and avoid the hassle of buying a Pendle rack again.

RRP: £162.00 for both versions

UCI Track World Cup 2014/15 Round Two, London – Day 3

 

UCI Track World Cup 2014/15 Round Two, London

Round One, Mexico 09 November 2014

Round Two, London 05 December 2014

Round Three,Columbia 17 January 2015

UCI Track World Championships 2015 France , 18-22 February 2014

 

Great Britain Cycling Team, Who Rides What UCI Track Cycling World Cup Event?

On Sunday 7th December:

Women’s Omnium – Laura Trott

Men’s Omnium – Jon Dibben

Men’s Sprint  – Phil Hindes, Callum Skinner

Women’s Keirin – Jess Varnish

Sunday December 07 2014

Morning Session: 08.00 – 14.00

1 Men’s Sprint Qualifying – 200m TT

  1. Edward Dawkins 9.975
  2. Robert Forstemann 10.008
  3. Matthew Glaetzer 10.015
  4. Peter Lewis 10.015
  5. Stefan Botticher 10.025
  6. Seiichiro Nakagawa 10.032
  7. Hersony Canelon 10.037
  8. Matthew Archibald 10.047
  9. Fabian Puerta Zapata 10.052
  10. Michael D’Aleida 10.070

Great Britain’s Philip Hindes qualifies in 16 with a 10.146

2 Women’s Omnium IV 500m Time Trial

  1. Jolien D’Hoore 35.595
  2. Marlies Mejias Garcia 35.747
  3. Laura Trott 35.918
  4. Jennifer Valente 36.065
  5. Malgorzata Wojtyra 36.228
  6. Anna Knauer 36.541
  7. Isabella King 36.566
  8. Yuanyuan Tian 36.583
  9. Laurie Berthon 36.710
  10. Leire Olaberria 36.714

3 Men’s Sprint 1/16 Finals

4 Men’s Omniun IV 1km Time Trial

  1. Scott Law 1:03.513
  2. Fernando Gaviria Rendon 1:03.583
  3. Bobby Lea 1:04.084
  4. Tim Veldt 1:04.203
  5. Oliver Beer 1:04.305
  6. Jonathon Dibben 1:04.580
  7. Casper Pedersen 1:04.603
  8. Hao Liu 1:04.975
  9. Loannis Spanopoulas 1:05.317

5 Men’s Sprint 1/8 Finals

6 Women’s Keirin 1st Round

Safely through to the next round were Shaung Gou, Kristina Vogel, Anna Meares, Wai Sze Lee, Simona Krupeckaite and Olivia Montauban.

7 Men’s Sprint 1/8 Final Repechages

8 Women’s Keirin 1st Round Repechage

Great Britain’s Jessica Varnish qualifies through the Repechage.

9 Men’s Sprint Quarter-finals match A

10 Women’s Omnium V Flying Lap (250m)

  1. Jolien D’Hoore 14.364
  2. Kristen Wild 14.377
  3. Jennifer Valente 14.423
  4. Tatsiana Sharakova 14.537
  5. Laura Trott 14.541
  6. Xiao Juan Diao 14.559
  7. Marlies Mejias Garcia 14.572
  8. Anna Knauer 14.639
  9. Laurie Berthon 14.675
  10. Isabella King 14.734

11 Men’s Sprint Quarter-finals match B

12 Men’s Omnium V Flying Lap (250m)

  1. Scott Law 13.186
  2. Fernando Gaviria Rendon 13.288
  3. Tim Veldt 13.325
  4. Olivier Beer 13.382
  5. Casper Pedersen 13.383
  6. Jonathon Dibben 13.437
  7. Bobby Lea 13.473
  8. Thomas Boudat 13.539
  9. Loannis Spanopoulos 13.557
  10. Viktor Manakov 13.564

13 Men’s Sprint Quarter-finals match C

 

Afternoon Session: 16.45 – 19.00

1 Men’s Sprint Semi-finals match A

2 Women’s Omnium Final 25km Points Race

The New Format Women’s Omnium Points race is now placed at the end of the series. Point’s are now added to the combined total from all the previous rounds.

Great Britain’s Laura Trott led the series going into the final round. Current World Cup leader Jolien D’Hoore had moved up to second. Netherland’s Kristen Wild dropped down to third place.

As the Point’s race unfolded, It was clear that the top three riders would mark each other. The race was rode very tactically by all three girls, and this allowed minor breakaways as the rest of the field tried to climb up the rankings.

The first five points went to Sharakova, the second to Trebaite and the third to Romanyuta.

Three girls were allowed to gain a lap as the main contenders looked at each other. Jupha Somnet (MAS), Sofia Arreola Navarro (MEX) and Caroline Ryan (IRL).

World Cup leader D’Hoore injected a bit of pace for the seventh points sprint, Wild managed third.

The crowd were thrilled though when the penultimate sprint came round. Great Britain’s Laura Trott accelerated into sprint nine and claimed maximum points and sealed the Gold Medal.

3 Men’s Sprint Semi-finals match B

(Previous Winner: BEL, Jolien D’Hoore)

4 Award Ceremony Women’s Omnium

  1. Laura Trott
  2. Jolien D’Hoore
  3. Kristen Wild

Belgium’s Jolien D’Hoore is the World Cup Women’s Omnium Jersey Holder.

5 Men’s Sprint 5th-8th

  • Stephan Botticher
  • Edward Dawkins
  • Nikita Shurshin
  • Robert Forstemann

6 Men’s Sprint Semi-finals match C

7 Women’s Keirin 2nd round

8 Men’s Sprint Finals match A

9 Men’s Omnium Final 40km Points Race

Columbian Fernando Gaviria Rendon claimed the Gold Medal after the 160 lap Points Race. Featuring in five of the sixteen sprints on offer, Rendon had been consistant through out the competition.

A strong performance from Australia’s Scott Law in the last three rounds helped the Aussie maintain his silver position.

Veldt, whom had crashed the night before didn’t feature in any of the sprints, and dropped down to fourth overall, whilst American Bobby Lea chipped away as the sprints counted down. Veldt and Lea both went into the Points Race, with a 156 points.

A four man breakaway were the only ones to gain a lap in this final Omnium round. Gate (NZL), Cheung (HKG), Manakov (RUS) and Ahiyevich (BLR) were all active throughout the sprints and were able to finish the competition on a higher note.

10 Men’s Sprint Finals match B

(Previous Winner: GER, Lucas Liss)

11 Award Ceremony Men’s Omnium

  1. Fernando Gaviria Rendon
  2. Scott Law
  3. Bobby Lea

American Bobby Lea is the current World Cup Men’s Omnium Jersey Holder.

12 Women’s Keirin 7-12 place

13 Women’s Keirin Final

  1. Shaung Gou
  2. Kristina Vogel
  3. Hyejin Lee
  4. Wai Sze Lee
  5. Jessica Varnish
  6. Tianshi Zhong

14 Men’s Sprint Finals match C

A thrilling third round for both the Gold and the Bronze Sprint play-offs.

Venezuelan Canelon was thoroughly delighted to take the third deciding race to claim the Bronze medal against New Zealand’s Archibald.

Hoogland whom qualified thirteenth earlier in the day took the third deciding race, to claim the Gold against Columbian Fabian Zapata.

(Previous Winner: MSP, Shuang Gou)

15 Award Ceremony Women’s Keirin

  1. Shuang Gou MSP
  2. Kristina Vogel GER
  3. Hyejin Lee KOR

Shuang Gou is the World Cup Women’s Keirin Jersey Holder. 

(Previous Winner: AUS, Matthew Glaetzer)

16 Award Ceremony Men’s Sprint

  1. Jeffery Hoogland Netherlands
  2. Fabian Hernando Puerta Zapata Columbia
  3. Hersony Canelon Venezuela

Columbian Fabian Hernando Puerta Zapata is the World Cup Men’s Sprint Jersey Holder.

17 Award Ceremony After World Cup Round 2, Leaderboard Top Twenty.

  1. Germany 2898.5
  2. Great Britain 2804.0
  3. Australia 2247.5
  4. New Zealand 2198.0
  5. Russia 2067.5
  6. Netherlands 1896.5
  7. China 1740.5
  8. Colombia 1487.0
  9. France 1400.5
  10. Spain 1197.5
  11. Canada 1148.0
  12. Poland 1061.0
  13. Jayco-AIS 1007.5
  14. USA 914.5
  15. Italy 895.0
  16. Belgium 881.0
  17. Japan 877.5
  18. Hong Kong 849.0
  19. Denmark 810.0
  20. Cuba 747.0

My photos are regularly updated on https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

Let There be Light! – Bontrager Glo & Ember LED’s Reviewed

Bontrager Glo and Ember LED lights

Bontrager Glo and Ember

Bontrager Glo and Ember

As the nights have become dark we all need to make sure we can see and be seen.

Bontrager’s Glo and Ember lights might not be quite the thing if you want to see but they will certainly allow you to be seen.

For the last couple of years I have been using the cheap £2 frog eye lights that are available by the shed load on eBay. While they do a job there is certainly a question over the level of lumens they produce and to be honest there ability to withstand the elements is suspect. I thought it was time to try out something a little more up market, even though this might go against my cheapskate grain!

As soon as I picked up the Bontrager lights I could tell they where going to perform significantly better then the cheap frog eyes.

The marketing blurb on Bontrager’s website describes the lights as follows:-

Test lights supplier by Bikechain Ricci

Test lights supplied by Bikechain Ricci

Instantly add front or rear safety lighting with the Glo headlight and and Ember tail light. Used as a stand alone system in twilight conditions, as additional lighting or as an emergency back-up, these compact, bright and stylish lights can be run in either steady or flashing modes and provide over 40 hours of run time. Each includes two CR2032 batteries and an elastic strap for attachment to a variety of surfaces including helmets.

http://www.bontrager.com/model/11364

The blurb on the packaging is slightly more generous with the run times, 50/100+ hours (Glo front light) and 100+ hours (Ember). The Glo offers 5 lumens and the Ember 3 Lumens.

Ember provides a bright rear light even in daylight.

Ember provides a bright rear light even in daylight.

Fitting the lights is dead simple and the multi hole bands allow for very secure fitting to either seat-post or handle bars, as well as potential use as a helmet light.

These little bad boys are way brighter then any lights of this type I have used before, certainly making them worth the money. They really are great lights to allow you to be seen by but not so good for you to see the road ahead. I frequently use them as my road lights riding city streets to and from the dark lanes or off road ride areas, where I switch to my high power Cree LED lights.

If you are looking for something that will help make you visible on your town or city commute in these dark winter months then get yourself along to your local bike shop and pick up a pair of Bontrager Glo and Ember lights.

CyclingShortsBontragerGlowEmberReviewRatingA definte one to ask Santa to leave in your stocking.

 

A CyclingShorts.cc Star buy at 90%

Retails for around £25 – £30 per set (can be bought individually).

A big thank you to @bikechainricci for supplying these lights for test.

UCI Track World Cup 2014/15 Round Two, London – Day 2

UCI Track World Cup 2014/15 Round Two, London

Round One, Mexico 09 November 2014

Round Two, London 05 December 2014

Round Three,Columbia 17 January 2015

 

UCI Track World Championships 2015 France , 18-22 February 2014

Great Britain Cycling Team, Who Rides What UCI Track Cycling World Cup Event?

On Saturday 6th December:

Women’s Sprint – Jess Varnish, Vicky Williamson

Women’s Omnium – Laura Trott

Men’s Omnium – Jon Dibben

Men’s Keirin – Jason Kenny

Women’s Points – Katie Archibald, Elinor Barker

Men’s Madison – Ollie Wood (GB ‘B’), Chris Latham (GB ‘B’)

 

Saturday December 06 2014

Qualifying Session: 10.00 – 16.45

1 Women’s Sprint Qualifying – 200m TT

  1. Elis Ligtlee 10.833
  2. Tianshi Zhong 10.941
  3. Shuang Gou 10.942
  4. Anna Meares 11.021
  5. Wai Sze Lee 11.049
  6. Anastasia Voinova 11.076
  7. Stephanie Morton 11.086
  8. Kristina Vogel 11.108
  9. Oilivia Montauban 11.126
  10. Lin Junhong11.192

Great Britain’s Laura Trott wins the opening session in the Women’s Omnium, the Scratch Race.

2 Women’s Omnium I 10km Scratch

  1. Laura Trott
  2. Kristen Wild
  3. Amalie Dideriksen
  4. Annalisa Cucinotta
  5. Isabella King
  6. Jolian D’Hoore
  7. Malgorzata Wojtyra
  8. Jennifer Valente
  9. Leire Dorronsoro Olaberria
  10. Anna Knauer

Two riders eventually broke free from the main group after several other attempts. Bobby Lea (USA) and Lok King Cheung (HKG) were joined by Great Britain’s Jonathon Dibben who faded in the final two laps. Columbian Fernando Gaviria Rendon won the bunch sprint to claim fourth in the race a lap down.

4 Men’s Omnium I 15km Scratch

  1. Bobby Lea USA
  2. Lok King Cheung HKG
  3. Jonathon Dibben GBR
  4. Fernando Gaviria Rendon COL
  5. Thomas Boudat EUC

Netherlands Kirsten Wild rode a very strong last 1000m, but not enough to deny Great Britain’s Laura Trott her second Omnium victory in the 3000m Individual Pursuit.

6 Women’s Omnium II 3km Individual Pursuit

  1. Laura Trott 3:36.896
  2. Kirsten Wild 3:37.107
  3. Jennifer Valente 3:37.417
  4. Marlies Mejias Garcia 3:38.619
  5. Isabella King 3:38.718
  6. Tatsiana Sharakova 3:41.588
  7. Amalie Dideriksen 3:42.246
  8. Jolien D’Hoore 3:42.476
  9. Sofia Arreola Navarro 3:46.172
  10. Laurie Berthon 3:46.566

Columbian Fernando Gaviria Rendon set off quickest in the Men’s Omnium Individual Pursuit and maintained his lead to win the second round. His time was over five seconds quicker than the rest of the field and almost on par with the Lee Valley VeloPark record.

8 Men’s Omnium II 4km Individual Pursuit

  1. Fernando Gaviria Rendon 4:21.998
  2. Bobby Lea 4:26.782
  3. Gideoni Monteiro 4:27.782
  4. Roger Kluge 4:29.638
  5. Aaron Gate 4:29.953
  6. Jonathon Dibben 4:30.617
  7. Scott Law 4:30.825
  8. Thomas Boudat 4:31.134
  9. Tim Veldt 4:32.649
  10. Jasper De Buyst 4:33.054

Finals Session: 19.00 – 22.05

Great Britain’s Elinor Barker finished third in the UCI Women’s Points Race. Taking a lap on the field, along with Australia’s Amy Cure and Canada’s Jasmin Glaesser mid way through the race. The trio looked like they would be the only girls that would get away from the bunch. As they watched each other, another four got away towards the back end, but were unable to collect additional points on the way. Barker didn’t have the legs to contest the final sprint and came in thirteenth. Canada’s Jasmin Glaesser took the final sprint, but Australian’s (Tasmanian) Amy Cure fought hard for second place to deny Glaesser the gold.

1 Women’s Points Race Final

  1. Amy Cure Australia
  2. Jasmin Glaesser Canada
  3. Elinor Barker Great Britain
  4. Yao Pang Hongkong
  5. Rushlee Buchanan New Zealand
  6. Maria LC Williams Columbia
  7. Lauren Stephens USA
  8. Giorgia Bronzini Italy
  9. Jarmila Machacova Czech Republic
  10. Stephanie Pohl Germany

Great Britain’s Katie Archibald finished Eleventh.

4 Women’s Omnium III Elimination

  1. Kirsten Wild
  2. Laura Trott
  3. Jolian D’Hoore
  4. Isabella King
  5. Lucie Zaleska
  6. Annalisa Cucinotta
  7. Evgeniya Romanyuta
  8. Amalie Dideriksen
  9. Malgorzata Wojtyra
  10. Laurie Berthon

6 Award Ceremony Women’s Points Race

  1. Amy Cure
  2. Jasmin Glaesser
  3. Elinor Barker

10 Men’s Madison Final

Great Britain 1 Mark Christian & Owain Doull

New Zealand Pieter Bulling & Westley Gough

Germany Henning Bommel & Theo Reinhardt

Australia

France 1

Belgium

Great Britain 2

Columbia

Italy 1

Switzerland

12 Award Ceremony Men’s Madison

  1. Great Britain 1 Mark Christian & Owain Doull
  2. New Zealand Pieter Bulling & Westley Gough
  3. Germany Henning Bommel & Theo Reinhardt

13 Men’s Keirin 7-12 place

Edward Dawkins

Krysztof Maksel

Nikita Shurshin

Francesco Ceci

Matthew Baranoski

Yuta Wakimoto

 

14 Men’s Keirin Final

Stephan Botticher Ger

Fabian Hernando Puerta Zapata Col

Christos Volikakis Gre

Azizulhasni Awang YSD

Kazunari Watanabe Jpn

Jason Kenny Gbr

Dutchman Tim Veldt survived a crash in the Men’s Omnium Elimination Round to take the win. The race was neutralized as the two riders sorted their bikes. Aaron Gates crashed out and Tim Veldt went over the top. Both riders re-joined the race and the determined Dutchman went on to win. Great Britain’s Jonathon Dibbon went out early in the race. A foot pulled out of the pedal saw an early exit from the race, along with any chance of riding into a podium position.

16 Men’s Omnium III Elimination

  1. Tim Veldt
  2. Thomas Boudat
  3. Fernando Gaviria Rendon
  4. Jasper De Buyst
  5. Sebastian Mora Vedri
  6. Scott Law
  7. Aaron Gate
  8. Oliver Beer
  9. Gideoni Monteiro
  10. Hao Liu

Great Britain’s Jonathon Dibben finished twenty-first.

(Previous Winner: GER, Joachim Eilers)

17 Award Ceremony Men’s Keirin

  1. Stephan Botticher Ger
  2. Fabian Hernando Puerta Zapata Col
  3. Christos Volikakis Gre

(Previous Winner: RUS, Anastasia Voinova)

18 Award Ceremony Women’s Sprint

  1. Kristina Vogel Ger
  2. Anastasiia Voinova Rus
  3. Elis Ligtlee Ned

My photos are regularly updated on https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

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