De Ketele and Van Hoecke win 21st Amsterdam Six-day

 

Click ‘playlist’ to watch the racing again. 

De Ketele and Van Hoecke win 21st Amsterdam Six-day

Kenny De Ketele and Gijs Van Hoecke won the 21st Amsterdam Six-Day this evening. The former Madison world champions defeated Leif Lampater and Raymond Kreder in a spectacular final chase. Jens Mouris and Wim Stroetinga claimed the third place.

The favourites didn’t give each other time to get into the rhythm at the beginning of the last night. During the first Madison, there were lots of attacks and every move was covered with another one. Eventually, Lampater and Kreder were the only ones to take a lap.

Five couples fought for the overall win in the second Madison after Stöpler-Havik and De Ketele-Van Hoecke went round early. De Ketele and Van Hoecke, however, pulled off a doublette in the closing laps to secure the victory.

“We had gathered enough points during the week, so we didn’t have to focus on the sprints and were able to go full-throttle”, said De KeteIe. “Tactically, we did great.”

The win in Amsterdam is Van Hoecke’s first six-say victory ever. “It’s very nice to take my first win here, as last year’s event was my first ever six-day.”

Track record
Tristan Marguet and Marc Hester put in a record-breaking performance in the two-lap trial. The Swiss-Danish combination won the event for the sixth day in a row and did so in a time of 21.495 seconds – a new track record.

Sprinters
Teun Mulder claimed the victory in the Keirin Masters. A third place would have been sufficient, but the sprinter, bronze medallist at the London Olympics, ended the week in style by winning. In the final of the Sprint Masters, Hugo Haak took on Matthijs Büchli. The winner of the race would not only win heat but also take the overall. Haak beat Büchli on the line and went home with the flowers.

Peter Schep
Peter Schep waved off at the Amsterdam Velodrome during the final day. The seven-time six-day winner decided to retire due to a lingering injury but rode one last derny race. Behind Ron Zijlaard the former European champion, out-gunned some old friends and colleagues.

Final classification Amsterdam Six Day 2013:

Rk Nr Teams Rnd Pts
1 4 De Ketele Kenny – Van Hoeke Gijs 0 282
2 6 Lampater Leif – Kreder Raymond 0 245
3 3 Mouris Jens – Stroetinga Wim 1 255
4 1 Ligthart Pim – Kalz Marcel 1 226
5 5 Stöpler Nick – Havik Yoeri 3 243
6 8 Marguet Tristan – Hester Marc 7 194
7 7 Markus Barry – Bartko Robert 8 44
8 12 Hochmann Jiri – Hacecky Vojtech 11 135
9 9 Boskamp Melvin – Asselman Jesper 12 134
10 10 Kreder Wesley – Hoffmann Nolan 15 114
11 2 Gate Aaron – Roberts, Luke 18 92
12 13 Caspers Didier – Van Zijl Melvin 21 33
13 11 East Guy – Holloway Daniel 27 33

 

General classification Keirin Masters 2013:

Rk Nr Name Pts
1 1 Mulder Teun 13
2 2 Haak Hugo 18
3 5 Buchli Matthijs 18
4 4 Hoogland Jeffrey 24
5 6 Van ‘t Hoenderdaal Nils 26
6 3 Hommes Bart 27

General classification Sprint Masters 2013:

Rk Nr Name Pts
1 2 Haak Hugo 15
2 5 Buchli Matthijs 16
3 4 Hoogland Jeffrey 19
4 6 Van ‘t Hoenderdaal Nils 20
5 1 Mulder Teun 24
6 3 Hommes Bart 32

Six Day So Far & Live Stream Finale

 

Click Playlist to choose todays live feed. 

Live stream
Starts 19:20cet.

 

English Commentary

by Carlton Kirby and former world champion Tony Doyle is available from 19:20cet. You can watch yesterday’s racing now from the playlist menu too.

Dutch Commentary

Eurosport commentator Martijn Berkhout and Vacansoleil-DCM Sports Director Michel Cornelisse are responsible for the Dutch broadcast and is available from 20:15cet from the playlist menu above.

 

Amsterdam Six-Day comes down to the wire

The final day of the 21st Amsterdam Six-Day promises to be extremely exciting. As many as five couples still have a shot at the overall victory. Jens Mouris and Wim Stroetinga are in the best position. They have 208 points and a one/lap advantage over Kenny De Ketele and Gijs Van Hoecke (212 points).

Mouris and Stroetinga were in control during the second Madison of the night. The pair quickly took a lap and was then able to control. In particular, De Ketele and Van Hoecke placed some vicious attacks, but the two Dutchman managed to dismantle every move.

“After we took that lap, we were in control,” said Mouris. Stroetinga knows taking the overall win will be hard. “It’s going to be exciting. Regarding points, the other teams are pretty close.”

No risks
During the first Madison of the night the favourites didn’t take any risks. They kept their powder dry. Melvin Boskamp and Jesper Asselman benefited. Along with Aaron Gate and Luke Roberts, the two young Dutchmen claimed a lap. During the nine intermediate sprints, Boskamp and Asselman collected more points than their two opponents from Down Under and thus won.

Mulder on the right track
Matthijs Büchli triumphed in today’s Keirin. Teun Mulder, however, is in the best position. Thanks to his second place the Dutchman just needs to finish third during the final event to secure the overall victory in the Keirin Masters.

Wide open
The Sprint Masters battle is wide open. Hugo Haak claimed the victory in the sprint final and rose from the fourth to the first position. He shares the lead with Büchli, who also has 14 points. With a total amount of 16, Jeffrey Hoogland and Nils van ‘t Hoenderdaal also have a chance for the overall win.
General classification after day 5:

Pl Nr Teams Rnd Pnt
1 3 Mouris Jens – Stroetinga Wim 0 208
2 4 De Ketele Kenny – Van Hoeke Gijs 1 212
3 5 Stöpler Nick – Havik Yoeri 1 203
4 1 Ligthart Pim – Kalz Marcel 1 179
5 6 Lampater Leif – Kreder Raymond 2 193
6 8 Marguet Tristan – Hester Marc 4 167
7 7 Markus Barry – Bartko Robert 6 36
8 12 Hochmann Jiri – Hacecky Vojtech 9 131
9 9 Boskamp Melvin – Asselman Jesper 9 110
10 10 Kreder Wesley – Hoffmann Nolan 11 83
11 2 Gate Aaron – Roberts, Luke 13 75
12 13 Caspers Didier – Van Zijl Melvin 17 22
13 11 East Guy – Holloway Daniel 22 31

 

For full biographies of all the riders visit the Six Day Racing website here: www.sixdayracing.com/Cyclists/Cyclists/

 

 

Six Day Round up & Day 5 Live Stream

 

Click Playlist to choose todays live feed. 

Live stream
Starts 19:20cet.

 

English Commentary

by Carlton Kirby and former world champion Tony Doyle is available from 19:20cet. You can watch yesterday’s racing now from the playlist menu too.

Dutch Commentary

Eurosport commentator Martijn Berkhout and Vacansoleil-DCM Sports Director Michel Cornelisse are responsible for the Dutch broadcast and is available from 20:15cet from the playlist menu above.

 

Ligthart in pole-position for Amsterdam repeat

Pim Ligthart went to work during the fourth day of Amsterdam Six Day this evening. By finishing second in the final Madison the Dutchman, winner of last year’s event and his German partner Marcel Kalz claimed the overall lead. The duo holds a one-lap advantage over the rest of the field.

“The last couple of days we kept coming closer and closer,” said Ligthart. “Now we finally have the lead and that’s a good position to be in. We still have plenty of work to do, though. The Belgians are still a threat. They nearly have 200 points and can easily pass us with the corresponding bonus lap.”

The Belgians
Ligthart referred to Kenny De Ketele and Gijs Van Hoecke, who have 188 points in their bag. Ligthart and Kalz have only 134.

Mouris & Stroetinga
Jens Mouris and Wim Stroetinga won in the final Madison. In the final fifteen minutes, the Dutch duo took control by taking a lap on the others. After that, they controlled and Stroetinga finished the trick by outsprinting Kalz.

Kisses & flowers
The favourites decided to save their powers during the first Madison of the evening. It gave Nolan Hoffmann and Wesley Kreder the opportunity to take the kisses and the flowers. The South African-Dutch duo escaped with Czechs Jiri Hochmann and Vojtech Hacecky and topped them in the sprint.

Keirin & Sprint Masters
Hugo Haak had a bad day in the Keirin Masters – a separate part of the sprint tournament. Thanks to finishing sixth and last, the Dutchman lost his lead to Teun Mulder. Mulder now has a three-point lead over Hague, who still sits second overall. The win, however, went to Jeffrey Hoogland.
The fight for the Sprint Masters title is still very much open. Nils van ‘t Hoenderdaal won the sprint and moved into the lead with Matthijs Büchli.
General classification after day 4:

Pl Nr Teams Rnd Pnt
1 1 Ligthart Pim – Kalz Marcel 0 134
2 4 De Ketele Kenny – Van Hoeke Gijs 1 188
3 5 Stöpler Nick – Havik Yoeri 1 170
4 6 Lampater Leif – Kreder Raymond 1 168
5 3 Mouris Jens – Stroetinga Wim 1 148
6 8 Marguet Tristan – Hester Marc 2 145
7 7 Markus Barry – Bartko Robert 4 24
8 12 Hochmann Jiri – Hacecky Vojtech 7 107
9 10 Kreder Wesley – Hoffmann Nolan 8 61
10 9 Boskamp Melvin – Asselman Jesper 9 80
11 2 Gate Aaron – Roberts, Luke 11 54
12 13 Caspers Didier – Van Zijl Melvin 14 21
13 11 East Guy – Holloway Daniel 19 20

For full biographies of all the riders visit the Six Day Racing website here: www.sixdayracing.com/Cyclists

To buy tickets to the event or general 6 Day Racing info click here.
The Amsterdam Six Day ends on Saturday 26 October 2013.

 

 

Watch Live Stream – Amsterdam Six Day 21st-26th Oct 2013

 

 

Dates: October 21-26, 2013
On Air: Approx. 19:20 CET to 23:00 PM CET

 

With 26 world-ranked Six Day riders forming 13 teams Cycling Shorts brings you a spectaculair cycling event the legendary 6 Daagse from Amsterdam, a lively week of cycling thrills and spills.

The field of Six Day riders for Amsterdam is complete. After world champions, Olympic champions, specialists and super young talent, the latest names added to the existing list of stars is impressive, it includes defending champion Pim Ligthart.

The evening starts with a 90-lap Madison with nine sprint points, each one after ten laps. The couple with the most points wins. The Elimination race works almost the same as the Madison, but now the team that arrives latest at the finish after the bell, has to leave the track. During the derny race, riders have to do 66 laps behind a motor-paced vehicle. In Team Time Trial both riders of the team barrel down after a few warm-up laps high up on the track and do two full speed laps. Halfway, the first rider gives the second rider a hand-swing after which the latter completes the race. Super sprint is a special kind of elimination race with a sprint every 4 laps.

Amsterdam Six Day line-up:

1. Pim Ligthart ( NED ) / Marcel Kalz ( GER )
2. Aaron Gate ( NZL ) / Luke Roberts ( AUS )
3. Jens Mouris ( NED ) / Wim Stroetinga ( NED )
4. Kenny De Ketele ( BEL ) / Gijs Van Hoeke ( BEL )
5 . Nick Stöpler ( NED ) / Yoeri Havik ( NED )
6. Leif Lampater ( GER ) / Raymond Kreder ( NED )
7. Barry Markus ( NED ) / Robert Bartko ( GER )
8. Tristan Marguet ( SUI ) / Marc Hester ( DEN )
9. Melvin Boskamp ( NED ) / Jesper Asselman ( NED )
10. Wesley Kreder ( NED ) / Nolan Hoffmann ( RSA )
11. Guy East (USA ) / Daniel Holloway (USA )
12. Jiri Hochmann / Vojtech Hacecky ( CZE )
13. Didier Caspers ( NED ) / Melvin van Zijl ( NED )

 

For full biographies of all the riders visit the Six Day Racing website here: www.sixdayracing.com/Cyclists

To buy tickets to the event or general 6 Day Racing info click here.

The event will be held at the Velodrome in Amsterdam at Sloterweg 1045, 1066 CD, the Netherlands.

Full Programme:

Monday 21 October 2013 till Thursday 24 October 2013

19:20  |  Madison Masters | Madison | GP De Telegraaf
19:45  |  Keirin Masters | Keirin | GP Main Capital
19:55  |  Madison Masters | Team Elimination race | GP Vlasman
20:15  |  Madison Masters | Time Trial | GP Deelen
20:40  |  Madison Masters | Derny 1 | GP Polygon
20:55  |  Sprint Masters | Qualification Time Trial | GP Plusine
21:05  |  Madison Masters | Derny 2 | GP Polygon
21:25  |  Sprint Masters | Semi-final | GP Plusine
21:35  |  Madison Masters | Super Sprint
21:45  |  Sprint Masters | Final | GP Plusine
22:00  |  Madison Masters | Madison | GP Drukkerij Koopmans
22:55  |  Ceremony leaders Six Days of Amsterdam
23:00  |  End
Friday 25 October 2013

19:20  |  Madison Masters | Madison | GP De Telegraaf
19:45  |  Keirin Masters | Keirin | GP Main Capital
19:55  |  Madison Masters | Team Elimination race | GP Vlasman
20:15  |  Madison Masters | Time Trial | GP Deelen
20:40  |  Madison Masters | Derny 1 | GP Polygon
20:55  |  Sprint Masters | Qualification Time Trial | GP Plusine
21:05  |  Madison Masters | Derny 2 | GP Polygon
21:25  |  Sprint Masters | Semi-final | GP Plusine
21:35  |  Madison Masters | Super Sprint
21:45  |  Sprint Masters | Final | GP Plusine
22:00  |  Show (no broadcast)
22:30  |  Madison Masters | Madison | GP Drukkerij Koopmans
22:55  |  Ceremony leaders Six Days of Amsterdam
23:00  |  End
Saturday 26 October 2013

19:20  |  Madison Masters | Madison | GP De Telegraaf
19:45  |  Keirin Masters | Keirin | GP Main Capital
19:55  |  Madison Masters | Team Elimination race | GP Vlasman
20:15  |  Madison Masters | Time Trial | GP Deelen
20:40  |  Madison Masters | Derny 1 | GP Polygon
20:55  |  Sprint Masters | Qualifications Time Trial | GP Plusine
21:05  |  Madison Masters | Derny 2 | GP Polygon
21:25  |  Sprint Masters | Semi-final | GP Plusine
21:35  |  Madison Masters | Super Sprint
21:45  |  Sprint Masters | Final | GP Plusine
22:00  |  Honouring Peter Schep | Presentation & Derny
22:30  |  Madison Masters | Finale Madison Masters Six Days of Amsterdam
23:35  |  Ceremony winners Madison Masters, Keirin Masters & Sprint Masters

RideLondon 2013

RideLondon 2013

If you were to tell me last Sunday saw 16,500 cyclists enjoying 100 miles of closed roads stretching from the Olympic Park in Stratford, East London, weaving through the city and out west into Surrey, I’d think you were crazy. But this was certainly no tall story.

 

 

 

 

The Prudential RideLondon Festival of Cycling hit the capital last weekend seeing more than 65,000 cycling enthusiasts enjoy everything about the bike. A free-cycle through the city soaking in the sites, a Bike Show and the Women’s Elite Crit Race on the Saturday. And on Sunday, the RideLondon 100 followed by the Men’s Pro Race, both taking in a circuit similar to that of the Olympics.

Back in April when I found out I’d won a place to ride with #TeamSkoda, one of the key sponsors of the event, I was not only excited to be part of the UK’s largest celebration of the bike, but pretty nervous too. I’d not long moved back from Amsterdam with the goal of becoming a grimpeuse (climber), or at least a better one than I was. RideLondon was the perfect event to give me the motivational kick to get my slow-twitch muscles working and build the stamina to complete my longest ride yet.

Training
I’d struggled at the beginning of the year to feel the love for the bike. Winter seemed to drag on and as an asthmatic; cold, damp conditions are the worst! I was struggling to enjoy club rides, knowing everyone else had to wait for me at the top of every hill. I decided the only way to deal with this was focus.

I invested in some turbo-training DVDs and started to get into the routine of coming home to a warm, dark house, shutting myself away in the attic for 90 mins. I was also attending weekly track training sessions – riding a fixed gear with intensive interval training was helping to build additional muscle and fitness. By the time I got back out on the road at the Amstel Gold Race in April, I could already see the difference in my power, completing the 125km route (including all the climbs) in just over 5 hours and with energy left over to party that evening. My longest ride yet.

Sussing out the Surrey Hills with Ben

Sussing out the Surrey Hills with Ben

Come the beginning of May, I was ready to head off to the Alps. Cycling for me has always been about social riding; particularly in windy Amsterdam. But for once I was on my own. By tackling the cols alone, I really got to know not only my physical capability, but my inner chimp. I not only came back a different cyclist, but ready to better my performance. I was finally in love with the bike again.

With lighter evenings kicking in, I was now back on the bike 3 – 4 times a week – mixing it up with long weekend rides and some challenging Cat 3 & 4 climbs in the Chilterns, track-training on a Thursday, and some fast, short interval based rides mid week.

Another week in the Alps at the end of June, and I could really see the difference. This time I wasn’t alone. But I not only felt comfortable, I knew how to pace myself and not succumb to the pressure of those that were faster around me. I came back broken, having never cycled or climbed so much in one week before, but I now knew I was capable of more.

Although I’d aimed to become a grimpeuse by the end of the 2013 season, I can happily say I’d already beaten my goal, if not bettered it. Of course, I still have plenty to improve on, but compare me to the cyclist of last year, and you wouldn’t recognise me. I don’t recognise me!

Race Day
The week before RideLondon I was struck down with a chest infection and fever; my lungs collapsing on me and a course of antibiotics prescribed. My worst nightmare and one I seem to live every time I have a big cycle event coming up. Feeling particularly rubbish, all of my enthusiasm had washed out the window, more a fear that I wouldn’t be able to start, let alone complete the full 100 miles comfortably. It was only 2 days before “race day” that I decided I would start and see how I got on. And aren’t I glad I did!

My alarm rung loud at 5am on Sunday morning. I stumbled out of bed into the lycra I’d already laid out the night before, and clambered into the already loaded car trying to eat some form of breakfast – in this instance a banana, 2 boiled eggs prepared the night before and a cup of tea. Entering London on eearily empty roads, I hadn’t really anticipated the eery empty roads I would soon by cycling on.

Arriving at the Olympic park, I was shocked at the sheer number of cyclists in their pens, like patient cattle waiting for the farmer to open the gate. There were hundreds, if not thousands, and I was only seeing an 8th, maybe even a 9th of the total number of cyclists that would pass through the start line that day.

Riding for Skoda, we were welcomed into the VIP tent, brekkie thrown in. Still half asleep, I only batted half an eyelid at Laura Trott and Dani King of Wiggle-Honda Pro team sat at the table tucking into their bacon rolls.

Me and the Matrix Fitness Girls

Taking advantage of the open roads

After a quick discussion with the rest of Team Skoda about our target times, the 6 of us were directed into our wave ready to start at a very prompt 7.50am, along with other Skoda cyclists and the girls from Matrix Fitness RA.

The start was strange. Not only were we swarmed by thousands of other cyclists, all with the same intention, but we were on completely closed roads, ignoring traffic lights and riding straight through junctions. For the first 5 – 10km, the majority were keeping to the left of the road, obviously feeling out of their comfort zone encroaching ‘the other side’. Soon losing the other Team Skoda members, I stuck with the Matrix Fitness girls, Hannah Walker, Jessie Walker and Emma Grant, as we weaved our way through the cyclists, out of the city and into the countryside of Surrey.

The 4 of us had concerns that the ‘swarm’ would continue into the hills, making it difficult to complete the course in a time of our choosing. But come Newlands Corner (not long after a little crash I had as a result of a stopping peloton on a narrowing road), the masses had started to thin.

Apart from ‘lethal’ Leith Hill, the last 25km had to be the toughest. I’d lost the girls following a medic stop at 50 miles and the motivating cheers of ‘you need to beat Boris, he’s ahead of you‘ were a distant memory. Everything was hurting, I couldn’t find a wheel I felt comfortable to sit on, and I just wanted to finish. Pulling onto the Mall, the crowds roaring with support, I was able to use the last of what energy I had to pick up my speed and cross the line with a smile on my face.

6 hours and 24 minutes after starting (including the 30 minute medic stop to clean my wounds), I had finished, lungs in tact! I was particularly happy to roll up to the second Skoda tent of the day, park my bike and enjoy indulging in some proper food, a shower and the Men’s Pro Race.

2014?
If you fancy giving RideLondon 2014 a go, the ballot opens this Monday, 12th August. Good luck!

 

With Thanks:

A massive thank you has to be passed on to the following people and companies:

Skoda & Cycling Plus for providing me the opportunity to take part in a fantastic event, with a big part of that thank you to Jonathan Durling for the support throughout the past few months, and the grandstand tickets!

Matrix Fitness Racing Academy, Helen and Stef Wyman for all of their support at Skoda training events, with particular mention to Hannah, Jessie and Emma for their support on the day.

Team Skoda – without the banter, training rides and comparison of notes over the past few months, the event wouldn’t have been the same without them. Well done all!

Boris Johnson, Prudential, the event marshals and St Johns Ambulance for laying on a fantastic event normally unimaginable for London and very much reminiscent of the Netherlands.

The spectators – a lot more than I was expecting – but awesome, every one of them!

And of course, my wonderful friends and family for all their support and for putting up with my moaning!

Hayley Davies

Hayley Davies

Writer

Riding since Feb 2011 Hayley is a 30 year old female who loves adventures. If she’s not on one of her many bikes or in the water on a bodyboard/surfboard, then Hayley is probably out looking for something new to keep the adrenaline pumping!
Website: www.hjdonline.co.uk

Guide to the Amsterdam Cycle Hire Scheme

The folks at Momondo have provided Cycling Shorts with a series of five useful infographics on European city bike schemes. The staff at Momndo put it together in their spare time. So a big thank you goes out the them.

When going on a city break, the best way to explore a city is by bike. You’re plans can be more flexible, it allows to truly experience the city, you can go at your own pace and discover places and streets that one would not see when taking the boring old tours buses. Government sponsored bike schemes make it really easy to do.

The fourth city in the series is:

 

Amsterdam
The perfect and probably safest city to explore by bike is Amsterdam. Its bike infrastructure is exceptional. When cycling by the small buildings, intimate streets, canals and squares one can practically feel the historical atmosphere of the city. Amsterdam offers a lot of culture with the highest density of museums in the world.

 

Public-Bike-Transport-Amsterdam

 

To view the Paris Guide click here.

To view the Berlin Guide click here.

 
 
 

Page 1 of 3123
X