Aviva Women’s Tour 2015 – Stage 1

All Image ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

 

The start of the Aviva Womens Tour 2015 got off to a ‘smashing’ start for Lizzie Armitstead and members of the media, not quite the finish everyone was anticipating.

 

With the profile of the 110km stage it looked like it would end in a bunch sprint but with QoM’s points to contest just before the finish there could be an upset.
Some of the big name riders in the hunt for a win were Bronzini and Armitstead, with their teams Wiggle Honda and Boels Dolman respectively keeping the pace high.

Aviva Women's Tour 2015 | Stage OneKatie Archibald, Pearl Izumi, “I think this race has been designed with the TV in mind with possible bunch sprint finishes. Stage 4 has a really technical finish but we hope to have everyone fighting it out to the end. My role in the team will be to sprint with the other Katie [Curtis], we will be looking for that kick at the end, Sarah Storey and Ciara Horne will be our main climbers.”

Archibald hit the deck approaching the first QoM (Queen of the Mountains) but Joanna Rowsell hung back to help her Pearl Izumi sprinter back into the pack, once she’d been seen by the race doctor. Armitstead looked to control the pace heading towards the QoM with Sharon Laws (last years QoM winner). Susanna Zorzi of Lotto Soudal unfortunately got a flat at the bottom of the climb.
6 pojnts went to Melissa Hoskins of Orica with Anouska Koster hot on her heels for the 5 points.

Lizzie Armitstead, “My form is good, I had a mini season break in May came back with two wins, I won the Tour of Qatar, I’ll take that confidence into the sprints but a much more lumpy race would really suit me.”

Orica AIS rider Emma Johansson, “ I’ve just come out of a tour in Spain that was really successful for me, I came away with 3 wins, I don’t feel like there is any pressure on me, I’m just gonna enjoy every day.”

The first sprint points were contested by a group of four riders but Coryn Rivera (UHC) won the sprint gaining the first 3 points of the tour followed by Marta Tagliaferro (2 points) and Elinor Barker (1 point).

Hannah Barnes UHC, “ I’m mostly looking at stage wins this Tour, last year was good with two top fours, Coryn and I are on form so the team is hoping to have a really good week.”

USA’s Heather Fischer took a nasty fall in the race for the second sprint, Tagliaferro took maximum points followed by Barker and Rivera.

Laura Trott, Matrix Fitness, “It went well at the Tour Series and the Milk Race for me, these stages are a bit longer than an hour race, two of the stages are 140km which isn’t what we train for, as long as I can get to the finish I think I can do ok.”

A five rider breakaway was established as the second QoM loomed ahead, the group consisted of the previous sprint contest riders, they were joined by Katie Archibald, and Coryn Rivera’s UHC team mate Katie Hall who was sitting on the back wheel waiting to pounce. The peloton chase was being led by Wiggle Honda with a 3 minute gap to the leaders at one point. Another gap developed as Katie Archibald struggled with the climb and was distanced from her breakaway companions. The UHC riders took the top two points available as the QoM summit (Katie Hall 6pts and Coryn Rivera 5pts). Archibald was last over the line for the breakaway taking 2 points as she started to slip slowly backwards, eventually when the peloton arrived at the QoM’s Sharon Laws mopped up the remaining point uncontested.

Giorgia Bronzini, Wiggle Honda, “For me and my team this race is a big goal, we are here with good riders and we are prepared for every solution that can be in the race.”

The leading group was down to four riders with 10km’s to go. Orica snd Wiggle had raised the pace on the front of the peloton and the lead groups advantage of 2 minutes 45 was eroded to 55 seconds.

Lisa Brennauer of Velcro SRAM“I think there are more possibilities for a sprinter than just the bunch sprint this tour, I hope it’s going to be exciting and not predictable as to who’s going to win.”

With 5km’s to go the lead group were dangling like a carrot in front of the hungry peloton.

With 2km to go the race became exposed to the crosswinds of the coast with those hiding in the peloton at an advantage.

Aviva Women's Tour 2015 | Stage OneUnder the Flame rouge and the breakaway was hanging in by a thread. They were quickly absorbed into the peloton. The sprinters came to the front and immediately Armitstead, Frapporti, Brennauer and Johansson showed their form. Crossing the line first was Lizzie Armitstead with Lisa Brennauer 2nd, and Emma Johansson 3rd.

The days spills didn’t end there, moments after the win Lizzie appeared to swerve to her left and in doing so hit a number of the press photographers, CyclingShorts.cc Chris Maher was one of them, they fell like a pack of cards. The photographers were in their correct position along with race organisers. Currently nothing is known about why Lizzie lost control of her bike but she went down very hard. She was rushed to hospital with a suspected broken femur, she was released later luckily with nothing more serious than bruises. Lizzie thanked everyone for their concern and also thanked the NHS staff who treated her.

Armitstead has a 4 second lead after stage one with a time of 2h39’43”. We wish Lizzie well and hope she’s able to defend her jersey tomorrow.

Stage One | Bury St Edmonds to Alderburgh

Stage1Results

 

U23 – Coryn Rivera

Best British – Lizzie Armitstead

Points – Lizzie Armitstead

Queen of the Mountains – Katie Hall

Team – UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling

 

Useful Links…

Twitter www.twitter.com/thewomenstour    Event Hashtag #AvivaWT2015

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Aviva Women’s Tour Women’s Tour

 

Thursday 18th June 2015 | Stage Two | Braintree to Clacton

AvivaWT_Stage2_Map-1

Words by Anna, Images by Chris Maher

Aviva Women’s Tour 2015 Team Presentation

All Images ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

Aviva Womens Tour 2015 – Final Start List

It was more than the warm sunshine that welcomed the ninety four riders on to the stage in Bury St Edmonds, for the Aviva Women’s Tour 2015.

A large crowd had gathered to watch and listen to each and every team member, as they were presented to the public. Among then, Olympic, World and National Champions from both Road and Track.

Soprano Laura Wright entertained the crowd with a couple of beautifully renditions from her latest album “Sound of Strength”. One was the theme tune from last years Invictus Games.

As each Team arrived to go on stage. They were escorted on by the local school children, whom had designed a banner to present them.

Lisa Brennauer, “The race looks harder than last year, and should make for an exciting race.”

Dame Sarah Storey, “We are always looking for a break to go.” This is her maiden Women’s Tour, and the girls are performing really well both here at home in the UK, and at their recent trip to the Tour Of California. 

Lizzie Armitstead, When asked if they (Boels Dolmans Cycling Team) would target a stage win or overall victory. “Yeh! We are going for everything” She laughed. Lizzie went on to say that she wasn’t well last year, but is in good form, and has a super strong team around her.   

Most of the girls agree that the longer distances in this years “Women’s Tour” are more favourable to them, and should suit the race leaning towards breaks going away most days. The girls that rode last year also mentioned that the enthusiasm of the crowds and schools that lined the route, were a big bonus to the overall feel-good factor of the Tour, and are hoping for more of the same. They want to hear you all scream and shout as they pass through the towns and villages.

The race starts in Bury St Edmonds at 11:00am June 17th on Angel Hill, after a neutralised start, the race officially gets underway on Airfield Road.

 

Stage One | Bury St Edmonds to Alderburgh

 

AvivaWT_Stage1_Map-1

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Event Hashtag #AvivaWT2015

Aviva Women’s Tour Women’s Tour

Cycling Shorts

Aviva Women’s Tour 2015

WT_15_Logo_WithDates_RGB

Cycling Shorts will be following this years Aviva Women’s Tour, from beginning to end. You can follow the race daily for information. Today you can find a Provisional Start-Sheet to download, Jerseys to look-out for, and Route Maps. Further Updates will be issued as the Race Day approaches with Daily Reports and exclusive images. Firstly, we will be attending the Team Presentation, where a final Start List will be issued, and we will meet the girls taking part.

The second edition of the Women’s Tour brings on a new title sponsor in Aviva.

The race covers five individual stages, with a total distance of 596.2 kilometres.

 

There are no less than eleven “National Road Race Champions” due to ride in the Aviva Women’s Tour.

Lisa Brennauer, Germany, Velocio SRAM

Jolien D’hoore, Belgium, Wiggle Honda

Pauline Ferrand-Prevot, France, Rabo Liv

Megan Guarnier, USA, Boels Dolmans

Emma Johansson, Sweden, Orica AIS

Leah Kirchmann, Canada, Optum p/b Kelly Benefit Strategies

Lotta Lepistö, Finland, Bigla Pro Cycling

Christine Majerus, Luxembourg, Boels Dolmans

Iris Slappendel, Netherlands, Bigla Pro Cycling

Laura Trott, Great Britain, Matrix Fitness

Linda Villumsen, New Zealand, UnitedHeathcare Pro Cycling

There are sixteen Teams comprising of six Team Members, competing in this years Tour. They will be presented to the Public on Tuesday 16th June in Bury St Edmonds one at a time from 5.30pm until 7pm.

 

Aviva Women’s Tour Rider List 2015 – Provisional

1730, Lotto Soudal

51 Susanna Zorzi ITA

52 Lieselot Decroix BEL

53 Chantal Hoffmann LUX

54 Anouk Rijff NED

55 Carlee Taylor AUS

56 Sarah Rijkes AUT

 

1735, Ale Cipollini

11 Beatrice Bartelloni ITA

12 Elena Berlato ITA

13 Maria Giulia Confalonieri ITA

14 Annalisa Cucinotta ITA

15 Arianna Fidanza ITA

16 Simona Frapporti ITA

 

1740, Team Liv Plantur

111 Lucy Garner GBR

112 Claudia Lichtenberg GER

113 Sara Mustonen-Lichan SWE

114 Molly Weaver GBR

115 Julia Soek NED

116 Sabrina Stultiens NED

 

1745, USA

131 Lauren Hall USA

132 Allie Dragoo USA

133 Heather Fischer USA

134 Hannah Ross USA

135 Lauren Komanski USA

136 Lauren Stephens USA

 

1750, Pearl Izumi Sports Tours International

91 Dame Sarah Storey GBR

92 Katie Archibald GBR

93 Katie Curtis GBR

94 Ciara Horne GBR

95 Joanna Rowsell GBR

96 Gabriella Shaw GBR

 

1755, Matrix Fitness

61 Laura Trott GBR

62 Elinor Barker GBR

63 Lucy Martin GBR

64 Mel Lowther GBR

65 Kimberley Le Court MAU

66 Helen Wyman GBR

 

1800, Velocio SRAM

141 Lisa Brennauer GER

142 Tiffany Cromwell AUS

143 Elise Delzenne FRA

144 Barbara Guarischi ITA

145 Loren Rowney AUS

146 Trixi Worrack GER

 

1805, Rabo Liv

1 Pauline Ferrand-Prevot FRA

2 Thalita De Jong NED

3 Anna Knauer GER

4 Roxanne Knetemann NED

5 Anouska Koster NED

6 Moniek Tenniglo NED

 

1810, Intermission

 

1820, Optum p/b Kelly Benefit Strategies

71 Leah Kirchmann CAN

72 Annie Ewart CAN

73 Ariane Horbach GER

74 Maura Kinsella USA

75 Alexxa Albrecht CAN

76 Brianna Walle USA

 

1825, Wiggle Honda

151 Giorgia Bronzini ITA

152 Audrey Cordon FRA

153 Jolien D’hoore BEL

154 Dani King GBR

155 Elisa Longo Borghini ITA

156 Annette Edmonson AUS

 

1830, Poitou Charentes – Futuroscope-86

101 Aude Biannic FRA

102 Charlotte Bravard FRA

103 Eugenie Duval FRA

104 Roxane Fournier FRA

105 Pascale Jeuland FRA

106 Amelie Rivat FRA

 

1835, Germany

41 Stephanie Pohl GER

42 Lisa Küllmer GER

43 Kathrin Hammes GER

44 Corinna Lechner GER

45 Madeleine Ortmüller GER

46 Gudrun Stock GER

 

1840, Bigla Pro Cycling

21 Sharon Laws GBR

22 Emilie Aubry SUI

23 Vera Koedooder NED

24 Caroline Baur SUI

25 Lotta Lepestö FIN

26 Iris Slappendel NED

 

1845, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling

121 Hannah Barnes GBR

122 Rushlee Buchanan NZL

123 Katie Hall USA

124 Coryn Rivera USA

125 Alexis Ryan USA

126 Linda Villumsen NZL

 

1850, Orica AIS

81 Emma Johansson SWE

82 Gracie Elvin AUS

83 Alexandra Manly AUS

84 Melissa Hoskins AUS

85 Chloe McConville AUS

86 Sarah Roy AUS

 

1855, Boels Dolmans

31 Lizzie Armitstead GBR

32 Megan Guarnier USA

33 Romy Kasper GER

34 Christine Majerus LUX

35 Kasia Pawlowska POL

36 Amalie Dideriksen DEN

 

You can catch daily TV highlights every evening on ITV4 at 20.00pm on the day of each stage. Repeated the following morning.

 

WT2015_OverallMap-1Wednesday 17th June 2015

The race starts in Bury St Edmonds at 11:00am June 17th on Angel Hill, after a neutralised start, the race officially gets underway on Airfield Road.

Stage One | Bury St Edmonds to Alderburgh

 

Useful Links…

Twitter www.twitter.com/thewomenstour     Event Hashtag #AvivaWT2015

Facebook www.facebook.com/thewomenstour

Instagram www.instagram.com/thetourcycling

YouTube www.youtube.com/thetourcycling

 

Aviva Women’s Tour Women’s Tour

 

Matrix Fitness GP Series leader Nikki Juniper Chats

Matrix Fitness GP Series 2015 leader – Round 2 – Nikki Juniper by Cycling Shorts

Nikki Juniper of Team Giordana Triton talks to Chris Maher of CyclingShorts.cc about her current lead in the Matrix Fitness GP Series 2015 after round two in Motherwell.

 

Nikki Juniper of Team Giordana Triton talks to Chris Maher of CyclingShorts.cc about her current lead in the Matrix Fitness GP Series 2015 after round two in Motherwell.

 

Read the race report here.

The Milk Race 2015 (Women’s Race) – Image Gallery

All images ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

 

Trott wins 2015 Milk Race by three thousandths of a second

Laura Trott and Kristian House win The Milk Race

Laura Trott today (Sunday 24 May) claimed victory in this year’s elite women’s Milk Race whilst Kristian Houseclaimed the 1st prize in the elite men’s race.

Riding around the city centre course in Nottingham for team Matrix Fitness, Laura beat last year’s champion Katie Archibald of Pearl Izumi Sports Tours International by three thousandths of a second. In third place was Pearl Izumi’s Katie Curtis. Meanwhile, in the men’s race Kristian House of JLT Condor was victorious over team Wiggins’ Andy Tennant and JLT’s Ed Clancy, who came in second and third respectively.

The women’s top five finishers were as follows:

  1. Laura Trott, Matrix Fitness
  2. Katie Archibald, Pearl Izumi Sports Tours International
  3. Katie Curtis, Pearl Izumi Sports Tours International
  4. Dani King, Wiggle Honda
  5. Jessie Walker, RST Racing

Speaking after her triumphant win, Laura said: “It’s great to win such a prestigious event especially with an exciting sprint finish. I’m really pleased to return to Nottingham and be in front of such amazing crowds. Here’s hoping The Milk Race returns again next year!”

The men’s top five finishers were as follows:

  1. Kristian House, JLT Condor
  2. Andy Tennant, Wiggins
  3. Ed Clancy, JLT Condor
  4. Christopher Lawless, Wiggins
  5. Sam Lowe, Raleigh GAC

Following his victory, Kristian said: “It’s great to be part of an event like The Milk Race. The atmosphere and amount of support from the crowd make it one of the best events in England to be part of.”

The Milk Race, which initially ran between 1958 and 1993 as the UK’s leading multistage cycling race, was resurrected in 2013 as a city centre event. In 2015, the majority of the event is being funded by The Dairy Council and DairyCo, meaning that all corners of the dairy industry are working together to put on Britain’s leading one-day cycling extravaganza. More than 100,000 people came out to see The Milk Race across the weekend.

This year, the elite races formed part of a festival of cycling in Nottingham city centre, which included a Schools Ride, a Family Ride, a ride for advanced cyclists and a special ride for the British dairy industry.

Once again, Nottingham’s Old Market Square was transformed into The Milk Race Village, where thousands of spectators took advantage of milk-based products and giveaways from some of the country’s leading dairy companies.

In an elite field containing numerous world, Olympic and British champions, the women’s Milk Race has become a key event in the annual cycling calendar, and offers a first prize of £1,000 – the same value as the men’s event.

Sandy Wilkie, Chairman of The Dairy Council, said: “Last year’s Milk Race was a great occasion but today’s event has surpassed it. It was a fantastic spectacle and a great celebration of cycling and dairy.  Our congratulations go toLaura and Kristian, and here’s hoping that, if further funding can be secured, The Milk Race can be a permanent fixture in the British sporting calendar for many years to come.”

Gwyn Jones, DairyCo Board Chairman, said: “The Milk Race is an iconic cycling event and represents a fabulous platform to promote to the public the benefits of milk and dairy in the context of sport. Sport requires commitment, enthusiasm and huge energy from competitors which is something dairy farmers know and appreciate as they go about their work in producing nutritious milk and the other dairy products millions of us enjoy every day. We’re delighted to be supporting The Milk Race in Nottingham.”

Councillor Dave Trimble, Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Culture at Nottingham City Council, said: “Today was a fantastic day out for residents and visitors. Nottingham is delighted to host such an important cycling event – one of many this summer as we gear up to welcome more world class sporting events. Congratulations to both winners.”

Further information about the 2015 Milk Race can be found at www.themilkrace.com or follow @themilkraceuk on Twitter.

Four Years On…

Over the last four years, one of the major regrets that I have had is the sport’s inability to retain female riders.  I’ve seen some really promising talent appear for half a season, never to be seen again, some have been around for even less than that.  Many find the sport hard, or just want to have a go to try it out only to disappear a week later.  But if we want women’s cycling to grow, everybody has to stick at it, so with that in mind, I thought I would share my reasons for competing with you, in the hope that if somebody like me can do it, maybe you can too.

A bit of background

It’s been four years since I started competing again.  Back then, I was working restricted hours, suffering from chronic fatigue, which meant that I had no energy to train after work and, even after the 45 minute circuit race, I fell asleep on the way home as I was so tired.

A Woman’s Guide to Racing (Part 1)

Time trialling on V718 in 2012

Following the 2011 season, I swapped medication under the guidance of my consultant neurologist.  I have epilepsy, which is controlled, but my new consultant wouldn’t let me come off medication whilst I wanted to ride my bike and do all the things that most people take for granted.  After being on sodium valproate for 15 years, I swapped to levetiracetam, which was a relatively new drug.

By March 2012, I had lost over two and half stone and for the first time in longer than I care remember, I could think much more clearly.  I was still tired (I had been diagnosed with chronic fatigue in December 2010) but the cognitive behaviour therapy that I had had to undergo as the treatment for the chronic fatigue had helped me to manage things much more effectively.

A slow start

The first few races I did in 2012, I got dropped the first time, had a woman shout at me because she didn’t think I knew what I was doing (I did, I was just shattered), and all I could physically manage to do was ride in 9 events, three of which were men’s road races, with the rest being closed circuit races.

A Woman’s Guide to Racing (Part 3): What training should I do?

Racing at Salt Ayre in 2012

One of the problems, I came to realise, with losing 20% of my own bodyweight, was the loss in power and strength that came with it.  We went to Majorca in September 2012, and we had to change the chainring to a 36 because I wasn’t strong enough to use the 39. The longest ride I could manage was about 60 miles, which was to and from Sa Calobra, not only because I wasn’t particularly fit, but also because of the remnants of the chronic fatigue.  Looking back at it now, that holiday helped my recovery as it kick started my winter training block, and reminded me that I could actually ride a bike!

Development, development, development

One of the good things about being involved in cycling in years gone by is that it meant that turning up to races, you knew what you were talking about.  However, I soon found that if it hadn’t happened on Facebook and Twitter, it hadn’t happened.  At this point, I was only a third category rider, so if I suggested something to anybody else, I always got the response “what do you know?” which got on my nerves no end.  So, I paid my entrance fee and qualified as a coach through the Association of British Cycling Coaches, as I couldn’t afford the pathway through British Cycling and there was no funding available for me as I live in a region where there’s a plethora of BC coaches.

By the end of 2012, we were getting a women’s road race league set up for 2013 as well as a development team for women in the North West, both of which are different stories, but it became obvious that the development pathway in women’s cycling was missing, and is something which we have hopefully started to build on now for the rest of the UK.

Coaching with Huw and Carley

Coaching with Huw and Carley

National Series and National Championships

In 2013, I took part in a few National Series races, but it became increasingly obvious to me that there were limits to what I was physically capable of achieving.  I was working over 40 hours a week, Monday to Friday, and with the additional work that I was doing trying to develop women’s cycling in the evenings (mainly articles, meetings and phone calls about the best way to improve the women’s scene with various people) and the odd bit of coaching and mentoring, it meant that I was doing probably around 60 hours a week, including my day job.  I still struggled to do any mid week training and racing in the evenings was an absolute no-go, so I was basically stuck with a small amount of time, which meant that I couldn’t do enough quality training to keep up with the better riders.

In 2014, there seemed to be a change in start times too, which saw many of the events with a 9:30 am start time.  One of the problems with epilepsy is that seizures occur as a result of triggers.  One of my triggers is tiredness and I find it extremely difficult to get up early to go and ride my bike (not even racing) as it takes my brain longer to wake up than most.  So it came to pass that I couldn’t afford to do all of the National Series events, for three reasons – I couldn’t afford it financially (I am self-funded and therefore it becomes expensive staying over before each event), I couldn’t afford the time off work (I only have a finite amount of holidays available) and I couldn’t afford it physically (in the event that the worst happened and I had a bad reaction to the early start), which is also a massive mental obstacle for me to get over.

But it isn’t only road race events that this affects – I can’t enter any time trials on Sundays because they all start too early, which also means that (on the whole), I can’t enter National Championship events either, or the RTTC Classic events.

(c) Ellen Isherwood

(c) Ellen Isherwood

What training do I do?

My training is pretty limited, as I have to keep an eye on my energy levels.  I don’t get home until six o’clock and I generally have admin to do with regards to the Racing Chance Foundation (from sorting the management accounts, to writing/updating the website, to trying to organise races), so mid week it’s generally limited to 40 minutes, three or four evenings a week.  At the weekend, if I’m racing, I’ll generally do a two hour ride on the Saturday (if I’m racing on the Sunday) or a three hour ride on Sunday (if I’m racing on a Saturday).  If I get to do more than 120 miles or 8 hours in a week, that’s a big week for me.  During winter, I tend to aim for 150 miles a week, but again that’s based on the majority of my riding being at the weekend (usually about 7 hours a weekend).

Racing at Tameside 2015

Racing at Tameside 2015

Why do I race?

It has since become apparent that the chronic fatigue that I suffered from between 2006 and 2012 was a side effect of taking sodium valproate.  After coming off that drug, I was like a different person, mentally and physically.  That being said, that drug was 40 years old and we knew what the majority of the side effects were (which is why I don’t have any children of my own).  The new drug only came into existence about 10 to 15 years ago, so it’s relatively new in the grand scheme of things.  I don’t know what the long term side effects of this drug are, but I intend to remain as fit as possible in order to keep any horrible side effects at bay (one side effect of taking anti-convulsants is a tendency for depression) and, unfortunately, I don’t know what I’ll be able to do when I get older as I don’t know what the long term effects will be on my kidneys and liver.

But in the meantime, I intend to support, help and persuade as many women as possible to take up competitive cycling as it not only keeps you fit, it gives you the self confidence you need to be assertive in every day life, which is where the Racing Chance Foundation comes in.

Every time I get on a start line, it’s an achievement.  I’m not bothered about points – I know that I’m never going to be a world beater because I don’t want to be, I just enjoy taking part.  I do know that it keeps me fit – since 2011, my resting heart rate has dropped my around 30 bpm, which I choose to take as my heart showing me that it’s fitter.  Unfortunately, I need something to keep me motivated and the racing fills that gap, even if a lot of the racing I do is actually training!

If you want to find out more about how to take the next steps in competitive cycling, visit the Racing Chance Foundation for some handy information and help make a difference to women’s cycling.

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