On Lubrication

Dirty Bicycle Chain Image by hlaricca

Dirty Bicycle Chain Image by hlaricca

For those of you that don’t know, when I’m not praying or meditating on the meaning and worth of pain, I work in a bike shop. Selling, maintaining, riding.

One of the questions I get asked a lot in the shop is ‘what is the right lube to use on a bike?’

There are as many types of lube as there are applications for it, and with good reason. Most of the time people are using the wrong lube for the wrong application and directly or indirectly bugger everything up.

Who hasn’t seen a chain laden with sludge, with slop dripping off the jockey wheels and cassette?

That’s not lube – it’s dirt. Dirt that’s stuck to the lube.

Who hasn’t seen a completely rusted chain, or a headset so gone that there’s rust dribbling down the fork? That’s caused by water ingress past the grease.

All of these parts have been lubed, but what has gone wrong is either the quantity, the quality or the regularity of the greasing has gone wrong.

I guess I’m going to go over parts of the bike, starting from the inside out and try and explain what each part does, what the function of the grease is in that scenario, and therefore how much lube, and what thickness of lube to use.

Before we start, we need to talk about assembly grease. Most parts on a bike that require a screw thread are made of aluminium alloy. One of the important things to note about aluminium is that similar to iron, when exposed to oxygen it forms an oxide, which unsurprisingly is called aluminium oxide. When alloy and alloy screw or press into each other, in time the separate pieces oxidise, much like rust, and ‘dry weld’ themselves together. Cue new chainset when someone hasn’t put a dash of grease on the pedal screws before fitting them. Cue new frameset when someone hasn’t greased the bottom bracket threads before tightening the cups.

Grease provides a barrier between the alloys, stopping them seizing. It also serves to keep air (and therefore oxygen) and water away from the greased part.

Assembly grease is cheap, and you don’t need much, but whenever you are fitting two pieces of alloy together, you *must* use it. Lecture over.

There is also carbon paste, for putting carbon things together. This contains tiny particles of carbon, which act like a grit and bite into the parts to stop them slipping. If you’re putting a carbon seat post into an alloy or carbon frame, be sure to use carbon paste. Else your seatpost will slip and you’ll find your groin slammed into the top tube. And that’s not pleasant. I can testify.

So, bearings and internal greasing:

First up, my go-to lube for internals and bearings is Finish line Teflon Grease. It comes in a tube to which you can attach a Finish Line grease gun, which makes greasing hubs and bearing internals an absolute doddle. It also works great as an assembly grease. When I say grease, I mean this stuff unless I specify otherwise. The grease is about a fiver, the gun about 20 quid, but should last forever. This stuff shouldn’t be used on rubber seals though. The lithium in it eats rubber. If you’ve got a part with a rubber seal, I’d recommend White Lightning Crystal Grease.

Bottom brackets, like the hubs, are an axle spinning in a ring of bearings. The BB bearings come in three main types – cartridge, threaded cups and press fit sealed bearings.

In a cartridge system (such as Square taper, Octalink, PowerSpline), the axle and bearings are contained in a single unit. The axle sticks out either side to provide space for the cranks to be fastened to. To get to the bearing we must (once the BB is removed) peel back the weather seals and apply the lube directly onto the bearings which are just inside the shell of the BB.

As they’re so close to the surface, and the BB gets a regular dosing of road spray, the lube we use needs to concentrate on keeping water and other solvents out, keeping the bearing running smooth and must be thick enough to stick around for the long term. Even the most die hard of us won’t strip the seals off a BB more than once a year – else we’ll knacker them through our over zealous intrusions.

To perfectly fulfil this purpose must be *thick*. Wayne Rooney thick. Almost solid.

So on your cartridge BB and hub internals, you want to have the thickest, most water resistant grease you can get your paws on. I tend to use lithium grease because it’s thickish, water resistant and messy, and a BB service isn’t a BB service without your clothing being covered in greasy smears.

Threaded cups are a lot more simple. They’re sealed, you can’t get in. When you bugger them because you were careless with where you were spraying degreaser when cleaning your drive train, you chuck them out and replace them. Good thing is they aren’t expensive. Bad thing is, you really need to be taking your bike to a shop to get it changed. However, assuming you have a Hollowtech II tool, a torque wrench and a work stand, you just put a bit of assembly grease on the threads and whack it in.

Press fit bearings (BB30, BB90, PF30 etc) are when the sealed bearing themselves are just pressed into the frame with no cups, either by hand or with a pressing tool. The benefit is that the BB shell (the tube in the frame through which the cranks pass) can be much wider, and therefore stiffer. The bearings are sealed, so once again the internals are ‘fire and forget’. For some ungodly reason, some manufacturers are now fitting these into alloy frames (as if they need improved stiffness) which means that the metal shell and the metal bearing rub against one another causing the whole frame to creak with every stroke. The trick here, to stop the creaking, is not to buy an alloy frame with a BB30. Or a carbon frame with an alloy BB shell and a BB30. Seriously. A thick pasting of grease, applied regularly to the inside of the shell, might help the situation if you’ve already bought said Boardman/Cannondale.

Headsets also come in different types, notably integral (often 1 1/8″, sometimes tapered to 1 1/2″ sealed bearings pushed directly into the frame) or external (usually 1″ cups screwed onto a threaded fork). For integral bearings, just apply a thin coat of grease to the inside of the shell and gently press in with a headset press. For external cups, these should be cleaned and repacked with grease annually, similar to hubs. Lithium grease, again, works wonders.

The only other internal part that springs to mind is the freehub body. There may or may not be another guide on servicing these, but in here we need to ensure that hub, pawls and springs can all operate smoothly. We *have* to have a clean, dirt free environment. I tend to use Shimano Mineral oil in here, because it’s so thin, but then again I service my freehub every couple of months. If you’re not that keen, a wet chain lube or a thin coat of White Lightening Crystal grease can work. Under no circumstances should any thick grease be applied in here. Stuff like ‘tenacious’ chain lube and lithium grease can gum up the whole sensitive apparatus and stick pawls in ratchets/stop star ratchets disengaging from the hub body. It has to be thin. And it HAS to be clean. Remove all the bearings, degrease thoroughly [with a degreaser naturally]. Clean with a clean cloth, remove any remaining degreaser, dry either with cool air or time (don’t use a hairdryer, you risk warping parts), and put a droplet of mineral oil on each pawl. Massage it in to ensure good coverage. Put a couple of drops on the ratchet inside the freehub body, then slip it together. Give it a spin until you can hear each pawl engagement as a distinct ‘click’. If you can’t, take it apart, clean it better, and use decent lube like I just told you to, you numpty!

Cables need lube when putting on. An oil based thin lube, like wet chain lube or mineral oil can smooth cable actuation and keep the outers from rusting. Just put a small amount on when fitting, don’t worry about redoing it. For those of you with high end groupsets, consider a polymer cable system. Shimano’s coated Dura Ace cableset is pretty damn good.

Now, lets talk about Chain lubing:

Use Lube image by Angela Richardson

Use Lube image by Angela Richardson

Whatever you’re doing, chances are you’re doing it wrong. I had one gentleman storm out of my shop giving us all abuse because we suggested that WD40 was not a suitable lube for his chain. He’s been doing it wrong for 35 years, apparently, and got quite attached to doing it wrong, and was enraged when a qualified mechanic thought he should know that there was a better way.

So, if you’re reading this, don’t take offence. Just know that there are a lot of lubes for a lot of riding styles and conditions – and while there are compromises, GT85 and WD40 are not suitable lubes under any conditions.

So as we’re here, lets start with WD40. ‘Water Displacer 40’ was the 40th iteration of it’s inventors (you guessed it) Water displacement formula. In order to push water out of tight spots and prevent it’s reentry, WD40 is very thin and has a deep penetrating effect. It’s highly flammable and a volatile solvent. This thin, solvent property provides its most useful cycle related application – cleaning.

While to remove thick, encrusted dirt (like on old hub bearings) a stronger degreaser is needed, for chains and other minor degreasing jobs WD40/GT85 works a treat. Spray it on a cloth, then grab hold of your chain and watch the gunk wipe away. GT85 is basically the same stuff, but it leaves a teflon coating which does serve to provide a long term lube for things that don’t move a huge amount. Like door hinges. And drawers. That is the limit of it’s usefulness. Is you bike chain a water filled crevice, a door hinge, or a drawer? No? Then don’t use a solvent intended for that, then.

WD40 also serves to help us unseize stuck parts. You know, when you didn’t use assembly grease, like I told you to.

So what lube should you be using?

Wet: Oil based, Wet lube is ideal for wet and muddy conditions where a water based lube would get washed away.

Dry: This is kind of like a talcum powder suspended in solvent. It penetrates deep into the chain, then the solvent evaporates, leaving a layer of slippery solid behind. Ideal for long dry rides or sandy/dusty conditions where wet lube would be turned into a sand paste.

Ceramic: These can be wet or dry, ceramic lube has nanoparticles that leave a protective coating on the chain, enhancing it’s life and making shifting smoother and quieter. It is sometimes branded as ‘Stealth’ lube.

Chain lube usually comes in two containers: a spray can and a bottle.
Spraying lube around tends to cock up brake surfaces, pads, internal greases etc, so stay clear. Buy bottled lube or not at all.

When applying lube to the chain, we don’t just throw it on. To do so would likely overlube, meaning that road debris is more likely to stick to it, and any dirt already on the chain is going to get carried into the rollers and booger them pretty quick. First grab that WD40 that you’ll never need and spray it liberally onto a bit of cloth. Grab hold of the bottom of the chain with the cloth and turn the crank backwards, pulling the chain through the cloth. This should really be done after every wet ride, but compromises exist for a reason. I don’t even bother with my Ultegra 11-speed chain. Do it before every lubing though. While you’re there, just touch the cloth to the jockey wheels of the rear dérailleur as the chain is moving to clean the gunk off there.

When the chain is clean(ish), apply the bottle of lube to the bottom of the chain, just in front of the lower jockey wheel and turn the crank backwards. You want a thin line of lube to form down the centre of the chain – not too much. Turn the crank backwards for a minute or so after you’ve lubed it – this helps the lube sink into the rollers – then wipe of the excess with your rag – again grabbing the bottom of the chain and running the crank back.
Do this every couple of weeks or every 200 miles, whichever is sooner.
Every 600 miles or so, take the chain off and clean it thoroughly. Follow a guide from Sheldon Brown or something on Youtube on how to do this. Dry and lube thoroughly afterwards.

What not to lube:
Tyres. Yes, people can be that silly.

Brake discs. Seems obvious, but you’d be surprise how many people try to resolve a squealing disc brake with a touch of lube. The squealing is caused by glazed pads leading to a lack of friction, not by too much friction. If you have lubed the disc, you’ll need new rotors and new pads.

So there you have it. The right grease, in the right place, in the right amount. Simples.

The Caledonian Revolution

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

St Andrews Day 2013 and the much awaited Revolution Series rolled back into Glasgow.  Would racing to a home crowd give the Scots some extra firepower?  Given the depth of talent on the start sheet, a fiercely fought battle was guaranteed.

Both the afternoon and evening sessions started with a sombre and respectful minutes silence following Friday night’s tragic helicopter crash in Glasgow.

With the temperature inside the velodrome definitely on the warm side, the afternoon session got underway with both men’s and women’s UCI Sprint Qualifiers.  Dani Khan (GB) once again showed she meant business.  Setting a time of 11.604 in the women’s 200m time trial.  Seeding her in third and comfortably taking her through to the Quarter Finals, where she won her heat against Helen Scott (GB).  In the men’s 200m time trial, Callum Skinner (Scotland) topped the seeding with a 10.346.  Up against Matt Rotherham (GB) in the Quarter Finals, Skinner showed his dominance winning the heat.

The UCI Points Races threatened to be savage and they certainly lived up to the hype.  In the men’s 40km points race Jake Ragan (GB) shone brightly.  Lapping the field twice and finishing with 49 points.  A truly gritty performance.  However, Kalz (Rudy Project RT), Stroetinga (Telegraph Allstars) and McCallum (Rapha Condor JLT) weren’t giving up easily and fought till the end for all available points [finishing with 45, 41, 36 points respectively].

The women’s 25km points race was just as thrilling.  With Ciara Horne (Team USN), Eileen Roe (Scotland) and Nina Kessler (Boels-Dolmans) taking a lap early on.   A few sprints later and Amy Hill (Team USN) pinged off the front taking a lap, placing her at the top of the standings going into the final stages of the race.  With one sprint to go Kessler, Roe and Horne took another lap, scooping up more points [finishing with 54, 52, 51 points respectively].

Khan and Scott once again showed their good form in the 1st round of the women’s UCI Keirin.  Both successfully going through to the final.   In the men’s round John Paul, Callum Skinner and Chris Pritchard (all Scotland) qualified for the final.  Leaving Matt Rotherham (GB) and Kenny Ayre (Scotland) to contest the minor final with Thiele and Kanter (both Germany).

Chris Hoy meets his public - Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Chris Hoy meets his public – Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

The final event of the afternoon session was the Elite Championship Flying Lap.  Ross Edgar (Rouleur) set the fastest time 13.836, with Nico Hesslich (Rudy Project RT) 2nd in a time of 13.850.  Chris Latham (WD40) rounding up the top 3 with 14.040.

During the break between afternoon and evening sessions, Sir Chris Hoy was launching his new HOY Bikes track bike.  Several cycling journos had been invited to take a burl round the track with the Big Yin on the new Fiorenzuola.  I had a brief wee look at the newest black beauty, as entry level track bikes go it’s certainly competitively priced with a beautiful understated timeless style and design.  Which is more than can be said for the display of sartorial elegance from many of the lycra clad journos ;)

The evening session started with the UCI Sprint Semi Finals.  Both men’s and women’s events producing nail biting racing.  Elis Ligtlee (Netherlands) and Dani Khan (GB) winning their heats.  In the men’s Semi Finals Callum Skinner (Scotland) and Robert Kanter (Germany) won their heats.

In the women’s UCI Sprint Minor Final, Rosie Blount (GB) and Helen Scott (GB) snapped up the top two spaces with Jenny Davis (City of Edinburgh) taking  4th.  Jeffrey Hoogland (Netherlands) just outgunned Chris Pritchard (Scotland) and Matt Rotherham (GB) to finish 1st, 2nd and 3rd respectively in the men’s UCI Sprint Minor Final in a time of 11.206.

In a thrilling Final, between the excellently matched Khan and Ligtlee, it was not to be Khans day.  The Dutch rider taking the win.  In the men’s Final the showdown between Skinner and Kanter had the Glasgow audience on their feet roaring support for their home boy, Skinner.  And he didn’t disappoint, snatching the win from Kanter in a time of 10.975.

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Always a crowd pleaser, the women’s Elimination Race engaged and excited the fans.  Emily Kay (Team USN) took a narrow win from Eileen Roe (Scotland).  The Boels-Dolmans rider, Nina Kessler finishing in 3rd.  In the Elite Championship Elimination Race, Jesper Asselman (Madison-Genesis) was victorious against Jacob Scott (HMT-Sportscover).  The 3rd sport taken by Andreas Muller (Madison-Genesis).

For me one of the most exciting parts of the programme are the Future Stars races.  This is such a valuable platform for the development and progression of young talent.

In the Girls 6 Lap Dash, Sophie Capewell (HMT-Sportscover) continued her good form from round 1, finishing 1st.  Lucy Harper and Emily Haycox (both Rouleur) finishing in 2nd and 3rd   – Not bad placing from Emily since she has been battling with ill health and is due to have her pesky tonsils out this week, hopefully she can return to the top of the table after she recovers fully. In the Boys 6 Lap Dash, it was ‘all the J’s’ with Joe Holt (Team USN) taking the win, Joe Truman (Rapha Condor JLT) finishing 2nd and Scotland’s Jack Carlin (Rudy Project RT) rounding up the top 3.

Onto the Girls 5km Points Race and 1st place went to Grace Garner (Team Sky) with Megan Chard (Telegraph Allstars) 2nd and Jessica Roberts (Team USN) 3rd.  Joe Truman (Rapah Condor JLT) finished 1st 4 points ahead of Jack Escritt (WD40) with Matt Walls (Champion System-Club Roost RT) finishing just 1 point down on Escritt in the Boys 5km Points Race.

The Future Stars 5km Scratch race yet again produced some very hard fought aggressive racing.  In the Girls Scratch, Paige Millward (WD40) finished ahead of Jessie Ansell and Lucy Shaw (both Rudy Project RT).  In the Boys Scratch, Joel Partington (Team Sky) took the win from Joe Holt (Team USN) and Tom Rotherham (Rouleur).

The women’s UCI Keirin Minor Final gave the crowds plenty to shout about with two Scottish riders and a GB rider doing battle for places.  In the end it was Scot Jenny Davis (City of Edinburgh) who placed 1st.  Rosie Blount (GB) a close 2nd with Ellie Richardson (Scotland) in 3rd.  Matt Rotherham (GB) and Kenny Ayre (Scotland) finished 1st and 2nd respectively in the men’s UCI Keirin Minor Final.

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

A 4th and 6th place for Khan and Scott in the women’s UCI Keirin Final concluded a really good day and night’s racing for the talented GB ladies.  Scotland once again showed well with a 3rd place for Skinner and a 5th for Pritchard in the men’s UCI Keirin Final.

Rudy Project Racing Team Win Madison TT | Revolution 42 ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Rudy Project Racing Team Win Madison TT | Revolution 42 ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Marcel Kalz and Nico Hesslich of Rudy Project RT took the win in the Elite Championship 1km Madison Time Trial in a sizzling 00:55.472.

Team USN’s Ciara Horne smashed the women’s 10km UCI Scratch Race by lapping the field in a tenacious attack.  Team mate Emily Kay snatched 2nd with Scotland’s Charline Joiner clinching 3rd.  In the men’s 15km UCI Scratch Race, Team Sky duo Chris Lawless and Germain Burton finished 3rd and 4th.

 

Round 2 TV Highlights

If you’re in the UK you can watch the highlights of Round 2 on the new BT Sport2 Channel (not available on all TV services in the UK).

Thursday 5th December 2013

For more information on the Revolution and to book your Manchester tickets for round 3 visit: www.cyclingrevolution.com

 

 

Results

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Elite Championship: Flying Lap
1 Ross Edgar – 13.836 Rouleur 10
2 Nico Hesslich – 13.850 Rudy Project RT 9
3 Chris Latham – 14.040 WD40 8
4 Chris Lawless – 14.435 Team Sky 7
5 James McCallum – 14.663 Rapha Condor JLT 6
6 Andy Fenn – 14.886 Telegraph All Stars 5
7 Scott Jacob- 14.988 HMT-Sportscover 4
8 Andreas Muller – 14.385 Madison Genesis 5
9 Scott Davies – 15.610 Team USN 2
10 Julio Alberto Amores – 15.653 Champion System/Club Roost 1

Lizzie Armisted Commentates  - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Lizzie Armisted Commentates – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk


Elite Championship: Elimination Race
1 Jesper Asselman
2 Jacob Scott Team Sportscover
3 Andreas Muller
4 Marcel Kalz
5 Christopher Latham 100% ME
6 Nico Hesslich
7 Lucas Destang
8 Scott Davies Team USN
9 Mark Stewart Team ASL360
10 Christopher Lawless Kuota – Spinergy – GSG
11 Michael Nicholson
Future Stars Podium - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Podium – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

12 Andrew Fenn Omega Pharma Quickstep
13 Julio Alberto Amores
14 Evan Oliphant Team Raleigh
15 James McCallum Rapha Condor JLT
16 Oliver Wood Team Sportscover
17 Germain Burton Team De ver
18 Wim Stroetinga
19 Ross Edgar Team IG – Sigma Sport
20 Jacob Ragan Wheelbase Altura MGD

Elite Championship: Points Race
1 Jacob Ragan Wheelbase Altura MGD
2 Marcel Katz
3 Wim Stroetinga

Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

4 James McCallum Rapha Condor JLT
5 Julio Alberto Amores
6 Jacob Scott Team Sportscover
7 Scott Davies Team USN
8 Germain Burton Team De ver
9 Oliver Wood Team Sportscover
10 Andreas Muller
11 Jesper Asselman
12 Nico Hesslich
13 Evan Oliphant Team Raleigh
14 Michael Nicholson
15 Christopher Latham 100% ME
16 Andrew Fenn Omega Pharma Quickstep
17 Christopher Lawless Kuota – Spinergy – GSG
18 Tim Veldt
19 Lucas Destang
20 Ross Edgar Team IG – Sigma Sport

Rudy Project Racing Team | Revolution 42 Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Rudy Project Racing Team | Revolution 42 Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Elite Championship: 1km Madison Time Trial
1 Rudy Project RT 56.001 10
2 WD40 58.993 9
3 Rapha Condor JLT 59.486 8
4 Rouleur 59.692 7
5 Team Sky 1.00.013 6
6 HMT-Sportscover 1.00.360 5
7 Telegraph All Stars 1.00.506 4
8 Champion System/Club Roost 1.01.482 2
9 Madison Genesis 1.03.648 1

Elite Championship: Scratch Race
1 Marcel Kalz Rudy Project RT 10
2 Wim Stroetinga Telegraph All Stars 9
3 Chris Lawless Team Sky 8
4 Germain Burton Team Sky 7
5 Chris Latham WD40 6
6 Andreas Muller Madison Genesis 5
7 Julio Alberto Amores Champion System/Club Roost RT 4
8 Evan Oliphant WD40 5
9 Lucas Destang Team Sky 2
10 Ollie Wood Rapha Condor JLT 1

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Points Race Women
1 Nina Kessler
2 Eileen Roe Ronde Cycling Club
3 Ciara Horne Team USN
4 Amy Hill Team USN
5 Emily Kay Team USN
6 Charline Joiner Team Thomsons Cycles
7 Emily Nelson Bike Pure – LeMond – Aspire Ve…
8 Manon Lloyd Abergavenny Road Club
9 Sarah Inghelbrecht
10 Alex Greenfield Scott Contessa Epic
11 Kayleigh Brogan Team Thomsons Cycles
12 Hannah Walker Matrix Fitness Racing Academy
13 Ella Hopkins Breast Cancer Care Cycling Tea…
14 Corrine Hall Matrix Fitness Racing Academy

Emily Kay - Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Emily Kay – Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Elimination Race Women
1 Emily Kay Team USN
2 Eileen Roe Ronde Cycling Club
3 Nina Kessler
4 Ciara Horne Team USN
5 Kayleigh Brogan Team Thomsons Cycles
6 Amy Hill Team USN
7 Emily Nelson Bike Pure – LeMond – Aspire Ve…
8 Alex Greenfield Scott Contessa Epic
9 Hannah Walker Matrix Fitness Racing Academy
10 Charline Joiner Team Thomsons Cycles
11 Manon Lloyd Abergavenny Road Club
12 Sarah Inghelbrecht

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars 6 Lap Dash Boys
1 Joe Holt County Cycles Racing Team
2 Joseph Truman I-Team Cyclists’ Club
3 Jack Carlin Team Thomsons Cycles
4 Tom England
5 Ellis Kirkbride Border City Wheelers CC
6 Thomas Rotherham Sportcity Velo
7 Jack Escritt Velocity WD-40
8 Reece Wood Aire Valley Racing Team
9 Stuart Balfour Ronde Cycling Club
10 Hisham Al-Ramah VC Londres
11 Rhys Britton Cardiff JIF
12 Fabian Brennan Velocity WD-40
13 Matthew Walls Velocity WD-40
14 Karl Baillie Witham Wheelers Cycling Club
15 Joel Partington Sportcity Velo
16 Jack Payne Sportcity Velo
17 Luke Morgan CC Luton
18 Matthias Barnet Edinburgh RC
19 Ben Forsyth Edinburgh RC
20 Joey Walker RST Racing Team

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars 6 Lap Dash Girls
1 Sophie Capewell Lichfield City CC
2 Lucy Harper Welwyn Whls CC
3 Emily Haycox Cardiff Ajax CC
4 Grace Garner RST Racing Team
5 Eleanor Dickinson RST Racing Team
6 Paige Milward Squadra Donne – Shutt VR
7 Sophie Williams Cardiff JIF
8 Jessica Roberts RST Racing Team
9 Elizabeth Bennett Cardiff JIF
10 Henrietta Colborne Beacon Wheelers
11 Jessie Ansell Wolverhampton Whls
12 Rhona Callander Stirling Bike Club
13 Megan Chard Bush Healthcare CRT
14 Lauren Bate-Lowe Eastlands Velo
15 Samantha Verrill Marton Race Team
16 Bethany Taylor Abergavenny Road Club
17 Sallie Birchall Lyme RC
18 Emma Borthwick Edinburgh RC

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Points Race Boys
1 Joseph Truman I-Team Cyclists’ Club
2 Jack Escritt Velocity WD-40
3 Matthew Walls Velocity WD-40
4 Joe Holt County Cycles Racing Team
5 Tom England
6 Jack Carlin Team Thomsons Cycles
7 Joel Partington Sportcity Velo
8 Karl Baillie Witham Wheelers Cycling Club
9 Rhys Britton Cardiff JIF
10 Stuart Balfour Ronde Cycling Club
11 Thomas Rotherham Sportcity Velo
12 Ellis Kirkbride Border City Wheelers CC
13 Hisham Al-Ramah VC Londres
14 Fabian Brennan Velocity WD-40
15 Reece Wood Aire Valley Racing Team
16 Jack Payne Sportcity Velo
17 Matthias Barnet Edinburgh RC
18 Luke Morgan CC Luton
19 Joey Walker RST Racing Team
20 Ben Forsyth Edinburgh RC

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Points Race Girls
1 Grace Garner RST Racing Team
2 Megan Chard Bush Healthcare CRT
3 Jessica Roberts RST Racing Team
4 Sophie Capewell Lichfield City CC
5 Lucy Shaw Solihull CC
6 Elizabeth Bennett Cardiff JIF
7 Sophie Williams Cardiff JIF
8 Eleanor Dickinson RST Racing Team
9 Monica Dew Sportcity Velo
10 Rhona Callander Stirling Bike Club
11 Henrietta Colborne Beacon Wheelers
12 Bethany Taylor Abergavenny Road Club
13 Lucy Harper Welwyn Whls CC
14 Samantha Verrill Marton Race Team
15 Jessie Ansell Wolverhampton Whls
16 Lauren Bate-Lowe Eastlands Velo
17 Emily Haycox Cardiff Ajax CC
18 Sallie Birchall Lyme RC
19 Emma Borthwick Edinburgh RC
20 Paige Milward Squadra Donne – Shutt VR

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Scratch Race Boys
1 Joel Partington Sportcity Velo
2 Joe Holt County Cycles Racing Team
3 Thomas Rotherham Sportcity Velo
4 Jack Escritt Velocity WD-40
5 Reece Wood Aire Valley Racing Team
6 Joseph Truman I-Team Cyclists’ Club
7 Tom England
8 Stuart Balfour Ronde Cycling Club
9 Karl Baillie Witham Wheelers Cycling Club
10 Rhys Britton Cardiff JIF
11 Matthew Walls Velocity WD-40
12 Hisham Al-Ramah VC Londres
13 Matthias Barnet Edinburgh RC
14 Joey Walker RST Racing Team
15 Ben Forsyth Edinburgh RC
16 Ellis Kirkbride Border City Wheelers CC
17 Luke Morgan CC Luton
18 Jack Carlin Team Thomsons Cycles
19 Jack Payne Sportcity Velo
20 Fabian Brennan Velocity WD-40

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Scratch Race Girls
1 Paige Milward Squadra Donne – Shutt VR
2 Jessie Ansell Wolverhampton Whls
3 Lucy Shaw Solihull CC

Scratch Race Women
1 Ciara Horne Team USN
2 Emily Kay Team USN
3 Charline Joiner Team Thomsons Cycles
4 Emily Nelson Bike Pure – LeMond – Aspire Ve…
5 Nina Kessler
6 Amy Hill Team USN

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