The Sufferfest Sponsors UCI Women’s World Cup & Introduces ‘The Suffer Prize’

INTRODUCTION OF ‘THE SUFFER PRIZE’ TELLS STORIES
OF EPIC SUFFERING IN EACH ROUND OF WORLD CUP
The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) is pleased to announce that The Sufferfest will be the Official Sponsor of the UCI Women’s Road World Cup in 2015.

A leading producer of indoor training videos, The Sufferfest has been a sponsor of the UCI since 2010 and of the UCI Women Road World Cup since 2014. It produces highly effective and engaging training videos using footage of professional races, including UCI events.

This year, the UCI and The Sufferfest will step up their collaboration by introducing a unique, new award for the UCI Women’s Road World Cup. At the end of each round of the World Cup, The Suffer Prize presented by The Sufferfest will be awarded to the rider who demonstrated particular determination, courage and suffering to help a teammate, to animate the race or simply to get to the finish line against the odds.

The judging panel will be made up of the TV production team, the Chief Commissaire, the Race Director and the UCI. The concept was extremely well received by riders and team representatives at the UCI Women’s Teams seminar in early March.

“This award is not necessarily about winning the race, but about the Sufferlandrian values of pushing yourself beyond what you thought yourself capable of,” explained The Sufferfest’s Chief Suffering Officer, David McQuillen. He added: “Women’s professional racing is incredibly difficult and tells inspiring stories of effort, sacrifice and resilience. We want to share these stories and The Suffer Prize presented by The Sufferfest is our way of showing how outstanding these athletes are.”

At the end of the season, The Sufferlandrian community will have the chance to vote for the Epic Moment of Suffering experienced by one of the winners of the Suffer Prize. The final winner will receive a $1,000 USD cash prize.

UCI President Brian Cookson commented: “The UCI Women’s Road World Cup is a magnificent showcase for women’s cycling, and I am delighted that The Sufferfest will again be supporting the series in 2015 with this incredibly unique prize. This is a demonstration of their esteem for this exciting and increasingly popular discipline.”

UCI Vice-President, Tracey Gaudry also welcomed the news: “As a former professional cyclist I have witnessed many inspiring demonstrations of courage and gritty determination within the professional women’s peloton. I am delighted that, together with The Sufferfest, we will be able to highlight some of these amazing stories.”

Winners of The Suffer Prize presented by The Sufferfest will be communicated via social media (@UCIWomenCycling & @TheSufferfest). In addition, news and highlights of the races – including an interview with The Suffer Prize presented by The Sufferfest winner – will also be available on the UCI YouTube channel (www.tv.uci.ch) throughout the season.

As the UCI Official Sponsor of the 2015 Women Road World Cup, the Sufferfest will enjoy visibility throughout the season, having kicked off with the Boels Rental Ronde van Drenthe in Holland. The winner of The Suffer Prize on that occasion was Orica-AIS rider Lizzie Williams (pictured above), who crashed twice, chased back to the pack twice and then broke her rear derailleur and had to give up, having no further spare bike.

This initiative complements other activities resulting from the collaboration between the UCI and The Sufferfest. For example, registrations are now being received for the first week-long training camp open to the public at the UCI headquarters in Switzerland in June.

 

More information is available on The Sufferfest website. 

LIZZIE WILLIAMS OF ORICA-AIS

WINNER OF THE FIRST
SUFFER PRIZE PRESENTED BY THE SUFFERFEST
Williams crashed twice and had twomechanicals. She twice battled her way back from the caravan to the bunch before ultimately withdrawing because she was out of bikes to ride. Not only that, after she completed her interview for The Suffer Prize, she discovered that her team had left without her and shewas forced to find her own way home.”It was probably the worst day on the bike that I’ve ever had, but you have to take the good with the bad in this sport. I had a bad day and hopefully tomorrow will be sunshine and no crashes. You’ve got to get back. You can’t give up. If you’re going to give up, you might as well not be here. I’ve come all the way from Australia. I’m not going to give up just because I have a tumble. I got to the front and hit the cobbles tenth wheel, feeling really positive, and 500 metres later myderallieur broke off and snapped into my back wheel. That was the end of my day. I had no bikes left. I had two bikes and they were both broken.” 

 

2015 Epic Cycles Women’s Race Team

In a big step for Women’s Cycling, Epic Cycles-Scott Women’s Race Team announced yesterday their plans to help move the sport and their team forward. Here’s what’s in store for 2015:

Over the past three seasons Epic Cycles and Scott Sports have been the two main sponsors for the successful Epic Cycles-Scott Women’s Race Team. Going into 2015 we will see one or two changes in sponsorship, but with the same team management and owners. A new team name will also be announced soon.

One feature of the team over the past three years has been its evolving terms of reference – in years one and two the emphasis was very much on the development of junior riders, while in year three the focus has been on bringing together a balanced and talented group of senior riders with the aim of riding together as a cohesive team, rather than as a collection of individuals.

This evolution will continue in year four, with renewed focus on rider development and a primary aim to act as a path into the professional ranks and/or competing in UCI races for those with ambitions to do so.

To support this aim we are working closely with the newly announced Matrix-Vulpine UCI Team. Our joint expectation is that a number of our riders will have the opportunity through this relationship to ride with the Matrix team as stagiaires in UCI races during the 2015 season, offering them the chance both to race in the pro peloton and to demonstrate what they could offer to a UCI pro team.

We also aim to build on our successes in the area of team work, and will be targeting key events in the UK domestic road racing scene, with a view to building on our list of 2014 victories and podium places.

The team will, as in 2014, be managed in a professional manner and we hope to further contribute to raising the standard of women’s race team management in the UK.

Key Aims

  • To provide team environment and structure in which riders can develop and progress, either to riding at a higher level within the UK scene or to a career as a professional cyclist.
  • To build on the number of podium places achieved in key UK races during 2014.
  • To provide opportunities to take part in UCI races and gain exposure within the pro peloton.
  • To raise the profile of our riders, team, and sponsors.

The Team

While we anticipate that some of this year’s line-up will be moving on to new teams, we are hoping to retain a number of our existing riders for 2015.

In signing new riders we are aiming, as in 2014, to assemble a strong and ambitious team who have complementary strengths and skills, so that we are able to enter races with different leaders and tactics according to the nature and timing of each race.

As in previous years, the team will not been built around a single star rider or to specialise in a particular type of race. Instead, we will aim to perform consistently well in all types of road racing, throughout the entire season.

Our planned team size of around 10 riders should provide sufficient cover for key events, while maximising the opportunity for individual riders to participate in a full programme of races without too many occasions where we have more riders than places available.

Our preference is for the team to be made up of a mix of over and under 23 seniors, but we do not have a rigid age or experience profile in mind. It is anticipated that most/all will be in some form of employment or education – full time availability to race is not a requirement.

A track record of participation and progression in road racing is essential. Previous race success (in terms of podium spots) is secondary to a positive attitude and a commitment to team work.

Epic Cycles-Scott Women’s Race Team

Hayley Davies

Hayley Davies

Writer

Riding since Feb 2011 Hayley is a 30 year old female who loves adventures. If she’s not on one of her many bikes or in the water on a bodyboard/surfboard, then Hayley is probably out looking for something new to keep the adrenaline pumping!
Website: www.hjdonline.co.uk

Team Giant Shimano on bike camera trials – Stage 1 Le Tour

 

The UCI are continuing their trials of on board bike cameras it’s being put to good use by ASO and Team Giant Shimano it really does show how much concentration and bike handling skills you need to get through each stage never mind a whole tour. These shots come from the bikes of Koen De Kort and Albert Timmer during Marcel Kittel’s opening stage win.

 

 

 

2015 Tour of Yorkshire Official Launch – Yorkshire’s Cycling Legacy Begins

3 days before the Tour de France Grand Départ,
the legacy is already underway …

Welcome to Yorkshire and Amaury Sport Organisation (ASO) supported by British Cycling have submitted an application to the UCI for a new, world class professional cycle race in Yorkshire.

If approved by the world’s governing body, the provisionally titled ”Tour of Yorkshire” will be a three-day race and its inaugural edition will run from 1 – 3 May 2015.

Based on the strong collaboration that has been built up between Welcome to Yorkshire and ASO for the Grand Départ and working in partnership with British Cycling, the race will be a 2.1 UCI Europe Tour event, guaranteeing the participation of some of the world’s leading cyclists and providing a fitting legacy to this year’s Tour de France visit in “God’s own County”. Indeed, the organisers are strongly committed to create what shall become “a breathtaking new race in a region made for cycling”.

Beyond the discovery of the entire Yorkshire County, certainly beyond the routes of the Tour de France Grand Départ, and an impactful promotion through international TV coverage, a strong focus will be put on not only sustaining, but further increasing the already outstanding enthusiasm for cycling in the UK. All three entities are therefore committed to creating a sustainable event which will also help grow the sport of cycling both in Yorkshire and nationally.

Christian Prudhomme, Director of the Tour de France added: “Alongside the public interest for cycling, highlighted by the Grand Départ, Yorkshire boasts beautiful breathtaking scenery worthy of any of the cycling season’s major events. It therefore seems perfectly natural for Welcome to Yorkshire, British Cycling and ASO to continue working together in this new land of cycling, through the Tour of Yorkshire. In particular, this three-day stage race will offer television viewers worldwide the opportunity to continue discovering the splendid landscapes of this English region, a journey started by the Tour de France, whose Grand Départ this year will remain its founding act.”

Gary Verity, Chief Executive of Welcome to Yorkshire said: “When we bid to host the Tour de France we did so in the knowledge that this would be the start of a long relationship with ASO. So I am delighted to be able to announce this exciting new race for Yorkshire. Our county is a new cycling heartland of Europe and we look forward to welcoming back some of the world’s best riders in Yorkshire in less than 12 months’ time.”

Jonny Clay, British Cycling’s Director of Cycle Sport said: “We will await the decision of the UCI but I am confident that ASO and Welcome to Yorkshire will create a world-class event attractive to the best teams in cycling. What is more, all three organisations are committed to ensuring the race delivers lasting benefits to cycling by engaging more fans for our great sport and by encouraging more people to get active by getting on their bikes. What is common to all our events work is a determination that they inspire participation in the sport and support the network of volunteers upon whom cycling is reliant at every level.”

 

Women’s Cycling – A Grassroots’ Perspective

Women's Road Series | Cheshire Classic ©CyclingShorts / www.chrismaher.co.uk

Women’s Road Series | Cheshire Classic ©CyclingShorts / www.chrismaher.co.uk

 

The Women’s Tour hits Britain for the first time this week, with some of the best international female riders racing for the first time in the UK since the 2012 Olympic Games.

There has been a large amount of media coverage in relation to this and for good reason.

However, anybody who believes that women’s domestic cycling has made a huge move forwards in the UK is sadly mistaken.  Yes, there is a Women’s Tour, which offers parity on prize money and conditions with that of the Tour of Britain, but the reality is that, for the moment at least, any woman who races on the UK domestic scene and is not part of the Great Britain performance programme (which is a track-based programme), is highly unlikely to get the opportunity to ride in the likes of the Women’s Tour and La Course by the TDF.

Ultimately, women’s cycling in the UK is still a side show, an afterthought.  Despite Brian Cookson setting up a women’s commission at the UCI, there is no such thing within the UK.  Whilst some of the greatest female cyclists are arriving in the UK to take part in the inaugural Women’s Tour, the women who race on the domestic scene will quite often find themselves being put with the novice fourth category men, which is an experience that is unlikely to entice the women to come back the following week!  There are a few committed people in the cycling scene who disproportionately hard to be inclusive towards women’s participation, however, these are few and far between, and lack key support.

Women's Road Series | Cheshire Classic ©CyclingShorts / www.chrismaher.co.uk

Women’s Road Series | Cheshire Classic ©CyclingShorts / www.chrismaher.co.uk

Nobody can deny that the Breeze programme has been a success in so far as it encourages more women to ride bikes.  But the Breeze programme is based on participation, not competition, and there is no real pathway to bridge between the two. The strategy as far as competition is concerned is practically non-existent, despite the numbers that British Cycling quote in relation to the increase in licences.  Ultimately, women’s competitive cycling in the UK on the domestic scene is an amateur sport, which means that it is run by volunteers. There is no money for “competition” because despite what you read (which can seem like propaganda quite honestly), cycling is run by men ergo the sport will always be seen from a male perspective.

So, what is the way forward?

Well, it is true, there has been progress in the last 12 months, with many more road racing opportunities for women, but these forward-thinking organisers need our help and support. Domestic events are all run by volunteers and everybody who wants to race (whether they are male or female) has to understand that it costs money to put a race on – if a race can’t at a minimum break even, then why should an organiser make a loss?

One problem with the circuit races that seem to be prolific in the UK for women is that they cost very little to run – there is a levy per entry (approximately £4 per rider) and then you have the hire of the circuit (usually between £50 and £150 depending on how long you need the circuit for) and the expenses of the commissaires for attending (usually two at closed circuit) and the first aider, but nothing much besides.  This means that you can have five riders in an event and potentially break even.

Road racing, on the other hand, can be expensive – not only do you have the levy per rider, but you then also have first aid, National Escort Group (motorbike marshals), petrol money for all officials who use their cars, for the lead car and neutral service (the cost of which increases the longer the race), as well as the hire of the headquarters.  Before you know it, the cost of putting on an event is at £350 and that’s before you add in prize money.  So that means that you need at least 25 to 30 riders before you even start to break even.

Women's Road Series | Cheshire Classic ©CyclingShorts / www.chrismaher.co.uk

Women’s Road Series | Cheshire Classic ©CyclingShorts / www.chrismaher.co.uk

So please, ladies, if you want to have road races in your region, please give the organisers the support they deserve and enter in advance as often as you can afford to and don’t rely on the ability to turn up and enter on the day (the latter will hopefully become more difficult as racing gets more popular and races fill up in advance).  There have been far too many races this season that have been cancelled or nearly cancelled due to lack of rider entries – you need to take some responsibility and enter in advance – our sport is run by volunteers who cannot afford to make a loss, so please enter in good time!

My final point reverts back to the fact that competitive cycling is run, for the most part, by men.  Until such time that women start to volunteer in larger numbers, whether that be as race officials or race organisers, and start to make their voices heard by taking their place on the Regional British Cycling Boards, there will be no significant changes.  I appreciate that for most people, offering to organise a race or becoming an official can be a daunting task, and I will have more news in the coming weeks for people who want to do just that.

Ultimately, women’s cycling is becoming more popular, we just need to ensure that it continues to grow in the correct way on a domestic level.

 

 

 

The Caledonian Revolution

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

St Andrews Day 2013 and the much awaited Revolution Series rolled back into Glasgow.  Would racing to a home crowd give the Scots some extra firepower?  Given the depth of talent on the start sheet, a fiercely fought battle was guaranteed.

Both the afternoon and evening sessions started with a sombre and respectful minutes silence following Friday night’s tragic helicopter crash in Glasgow.

With the temperature inside the velodrome definitely on the warm side, the afternoon session got underway with both men’s and women’s UCI Sprint Qualifiers.  Dani Khan (GB) once again showed she meant business.  Setting a time of 11.604 in the women’s 200m time trial.  Seeding her in third and comfortably taking her through to the Quarter Finals, where she won her heat against Helen Scott (GB).  In the men’s 200m time trial, Callum Skinner (Scotland) topped the seeding with a 10.346.  Up against Matt Rotherham (GB) in the Quarter Finals, Skinner showed his dominance winning the heat.

The UCI Points Races threatened to be savage and they certainly lived up to the hype.  In the men’s 40km points race Jake Ragan (GB) shone brightly.  Lapping the field twice and finishing with 49 points.  A truly gritty performance.  However, Kalz (Rudy Project RT), Stroetinga (Telegraph Allstars) and McCallum (Rapha Condor JLT) weren’t giving up easily and fought till the end for all available points [finishing with 45, 41, 36 points respectively].

The women’s 25km points race was just as thrilling.  With Ciara Horne (Team USN), Eileen Roe (Scotland) and Nina Kessler (Boels-Dolmans) taking a lap early on.   A few sprints later and Amy Hill (Team USN) pinged off the front taking a lap, placing her at the top of the standings going into the final stages of the race.  With one sprint to go Kessler, Roe and Horne took another lap, scooping up more points [finishing with 54, 52, 51 points respectively].

Khan and Scott once again showed their good form in the 1st round of the women’s UCI Keirin.  Both successfully going through to the final.   In the men’s round John Paul, Callum Skinner and Chris Pritchard (all Scotland) qualified for the final.  Leaving Matt Rotherham (GB) and Kenny Ayre (Scotland) to contest the minor final with Thiele and Kanter (both Germany).

Chris Hoy meets his public - Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Chris Hoy meets his public – Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

The final event of the afternoon session was the Elite Championship Flying Lap.  Ross Edgar (Rouleur) set the fastest time 13.836, with Nico Hesslich (Rudy Project RT) 2nd in a time of 13.850.  Chris Latham (WD40) rounding up the top 3 with 14.040.

During the break between afternoon and evening sessions, Sir Chris Hoy was launching his new HOY Bikes track bike.  Several cycling journos had been invited to take a burl round the track with the Big Yin on the new Fiorenzuola.  I had a brief wee look at the newest black beauty, as entry level track bikes go it’s certainly competitively priced with a beautiful understated timeless style and design.  Which is more than can be said for the display of sartorial elegance from many of the lycra clad journos ;)

The evening session started with the UCI Sprint Semi Finals.  Both men’s and women’s events producing nail biting racing.  Elis Ligtlee (Netherlands) and Dani Khan (GB) winning their heats.  In the men’s Semi Finals Callum Skinner (Scotland) and Robert Kanter (Germany) won their heats.

In the women’s UCI Sprint Minor Final, Rosie Blount (GB) and Helen Scott (GB) snapped up the top two spaces with Jenny Davis (City of Edinburgh) taking  4th.  Jeffrey Hoogland (Netherlands) just outgunned Chris Pritchard (Scotland) and Matt Rotherham (GB) to finish 1st, 2nd and 3rd respectively in the men’s UCI Sprint Minor Final in a time of 11.206.

In a thrilling Final, between the excellently matched Khan and Ligtlee, it was not to be Khans day.  The Dutch rider taking the win.  In the men’s Final the showdown between Skinner and Kanter had the Glasgow audience on their feet roaring support for their home boy, Skinner.  And he didn’t disappoint, snatching the win from Kanter in a time of 10.975.

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Always a crowd pleaser, the women’s Elimination Race engaged and excited the fans.  Emily Kay (Team USN) took a narrow win from Eileen Roe (Scotland).  The Boels-Dolmans rider, Nina Kessler finishing in 3rd.  In the Elite Championship Elimination Race, Jesper Asselman (Madison-Genesis) was victorious against Jacob Scott (HMT-Sportscover).  The 3rd sport taken by Andreas Muller (Madison-Genesis).

For me one of the most exciting parts of the programme are the Future Stars races.  This is such a valuable platform for the development and progression of young talent.

In the Girls 6 Lap Dash, Sophie Capewell (HMT-Sportscover) continued her good form from round 1, finishing 1st.  Lucy Harper and Emily Haycox (both Rouleur) finishing in 2nd and 3rd   – Not bad placing from Emily since she has been battling with ill health and is due to have her pesky tonsils out this week, hopefully she can return to the top of the table after she recovers fully. In the Boys 6 Lap Dash, it was ‘all the J’s’ with Joe Holt (Team USN) taking the win, Joe Truman (Rapha Condor JLT) finishing 2nd and Scotland’s Jack Carlin (Rudy Project RT) rounding up the top 3.

Onto the Girls 5km Points Race and 1st place went to Grace Garner (Team Sky) with Megan Chard (Telegraph Allstars) 2nd and Jessica Roberts (Team USN) 3rd.  Joe Truman (Rapah Condor JLT) finished 1st 4 points ahead of Jack Escritt (WD40) with Matt Walls (Champion System-Club Roost RT) finishing just 1 point down on Escritt in the Boys 5km Points Race.

The Future Stars 5km Scratch race yet again produced some very hard fought aggressive racing.  In the Girls Scratch, Paige Millward (WD40) finished ahead of Jessie Ansell and Lucy Shaw (both Rudy Project RT).  In the Boys Scratch, Joel Partington (Team Sky) took the win from Joe Holt (Team USN) and Tom Rotherham (Rouleur).

The women’s UCI Keirin Minor Final gave the crowds plenty to shout about with two Scottish riders and a GB rider doing battle for places.  In the end it was Scot Jenny Davis (City of Edinburgh) who placed 1st.  Rosie Blount (GB) a close 2nd with Ellie Richardson (Scotland) in 3rd.  Matt Rotherham (GB) and Kenny Ayre (Scotland) finished 1st and 2nd respectively in the men’s UCI Keirin Minor Final.

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

A 4th and 6th place for Khan and Scott in the women’s UCI Keirin Final concluded a really good day and night’s racing for the talented GB ladies.  Scotland once again showed well with a 3rd place for Skinner and a 5th for Pritchard in the men’s UCI Keirin Final.

Rudy Project Racing Team Win Madison TT | Revolution 42 ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Rudy Project Racing Team Win Madison TT | Revolution 42 ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Marcel Kalz and Nico Hesslich of Rudy Project RT took the win in the Elite Championship 1km Madison Time Trial in a sizzling 00:55.472.

Team USN’s Ciara Horne smashed the women’s 10km UCI Scratch Race by lapping the field in a tenacious attack.  Team mate Emily Kay snatched 2nd with Scotland’s Charline Joiner clinching 3rd.  In the men’s 15km UCI Scratch Race, Team Sky duo Chris Lawless and Germain Burton finished 3rd and 4th.

 

Round 2 TV Highlights

If you’re in the UK you can watch the highlights of Round 2 on the new BT Sport2 Channel (not available on all TV services in the UK).

Thursday 5th December 2013

For more information on the Revolution and to book your Manchester tickets for round 3 visit: www.cyclingrevolution.com

 

 

Results

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Elite Championship: Flying Lap
1 Ross Edgar – 13.836 Rouleur 10
2 Nico Hesslich – 13.850 Rudy Project RT 9
3 Chris Latham – 14.040 WD40 8
4 Chris Lawless – 14.435 Team Sky 7
5 James McCallum – 14.663 Rapha Condor JLT 6
6 Andy Fenn – 14.886 Telegraph All Stars 5
7 Scott Jacob- 14.988 HMT-Sportscover 4
8 Andreas Muller – 14.385 Madison Genesis 5
9 Scott Davies – 15.610 Team USN 2
10 Julio Alberto Amores – 15.653 Champion System/Club Roost 1

Lizzie Armisted Commentates  - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Lizzie Armisted Commentates – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk


Elite Championship: Elimination Race
1 Jesper Asselman
2 Jacob Scott Team Sportscover
3 Andreas Muller
4 Marcel Kalz
5 Christopher Latham 100% ME
6 Nico Hesslich
7 Lucas Destang
8 Scott Davies Team USN
9 Mark Stewart Team ASL360
10 Christopher Lawless Kuota – Spinergy – GSG
11 Michael Nicholson
Future Stars Podium - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Podium – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

12 Andrew Fenn Omega Pharma Quickstep
13 Julio Alberto Amores
14 Evan Oliphant Team Raleigh
15 James McCallum Rapha Condor JLT
16 Oliver Wood Team Sportscover
17 Germain Burton Team De ver
18 Wim Stroetinga
19 Ross Edgar Team IG – Sigma Sport
20 Jacob Ragan Wheelbase Altura MGD

Elite Championship: Points Race
1 Jacob Ragan Wheelbase Altura MGD
2 Marcel Katz
3 Wim Stroetinga

Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

4 James McCallum Rapha Condor JLT
5 Julio Alberto Amores
6 Jacob Scott Team Sportscover
7 Scott Davies Team USN
8 Germain Burton Team De ver
9 Oliver Wood Team Sportscover
10 Andreas Muller
11 Jesper Asselman
12 Nico Hesslich
13 Evan Oliphant Team Raleigh
14 Michael Nicholson
15 Christopher Latham 100% ME
16 Andrew Fenn Omega Pharma Quickstep
17 Christopher Lawless Kuota – Spinergy – GSG
18 Tim Veldt
19 Lucas Destang
20 Ross Edgar Team IG – Sigma Sport

Rudy Project Racing Team | Revolution 42 Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Rudy Project Racing Team | Revolution 42 Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Elite Championship: 1km Madison Time Trial
1 Rudy Project RT 56.001 10
2 WD40 58.993 9
3 Rapha Condor JLT 59.486 8
4 Rouleur 59.692 7
5 Team Sky 1.00.013 6
6 HMT-Sportscover 1.00.360 5
7 Telegraph All Stars 1.00.506 4
8 Champion System/Club Roost 1.01.482 2
9 Madison Genesis 1.03.648 1

Elite Championship: Scratch Race
1 Marcel Kalz Rudy Project RT 10
2 Wim Stroetinga Telegraph All Stars 9
3 Chris Lawless Team Sky 8
4 Germain Burton Team Sky 7
5 Chris Latham WD40 6
6 Andreas Muller Madison Genesis 5
7 Julio Alberto Amores Champion System/Club Roost RT 4
8 Evan Oliphant WD40 5
9 Lucas Destang Team Sky 2
10 Ollie Wood Rapha Condor JLT 1

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Points Race Women
1 Nina Kessler
2 Eileen Roe Ronde Cycling Club
3 Ciara Horne Team USN
4 Amy Hill Team USN
5 Emily Kay Team USN
6 Charline Joiner Team Thomsons Cycles
7 Emily Nelson Bike Pure – LeMond – Aspire Ve…
8 Manon Lloyd Abergavenny Road Club
9 Sarah Inghelbrecht
10 Alex Greenfield Scott Contessa Epic
11 Kayleigh Brogan Team Thomsons Cycles
12 Hannah Walker Matrix Fitness Racing Academy
13 Ella Hopkins Breast Cancer Care Cycling Tea…
14 Corrine Hall Matrix Fitness Racing Academy

Emily Kay - Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome - Glasgow - Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Emily Kay – Revolution 42 | Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – Glasgow – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Elimination Race Women
1 Emily Kay Team USN
2 Eileen Roe Ronde Cycling Club
3 Nina Kessler
4 Ciara Horne Team USN
5 Kayleigh Brogan Team Thomsons Cycles
6 Amy Hill Team USN
7 Emily Nelson Bike Pure – LeMond – Aspire Ve…
8 Alex Greenfield Scott Contessa Epic
9 Hannah Walker Matrix Fitness Racing Academy
10 Charline Joiner Team Thomsons Cycles
11 Manon Lloyd Abergavenny Road Club
12 Sarah Inghelbrecht

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars 6 Lap Dash Boys
1 Joe Holt County Cycles Racing Team
2 Joseph Truman I-Team Cyclists’ Club
3 Jack Carlin Team Thomsons Cycles
4 Tom England
5 Ellis Kirkbride Border City Wheelers CC
6 Thomas Rotherham Sportcity Velo
7 Jack Escritt Velocity WD-40
8 Reece Wood Aire Valley Racing Team
9 Stuart Balfour Ronde Cycling Club
10 Hisham Al-Ramah VC Londres
11 Rhys Britton Cardiff JIF
12 Fabian Brennan Velocity WD-40
13 Matthew Walls Velocity WD-40
14 Karl Baillie Witham Wheelers Cycling Club
15 Joel Partington Sportcity Velo
16 Jack Payne Sportcity Velo
17 Luke Morgan CC Luton
18 Matthias Barnet Edinburgh RC
19 Ben Forsyth Edinburgh RC
20 Joey Walker RST Racing Team

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars 6 Lap Dash Girls
1 Sophie Capewell Lichfield City CC
2 Lucy Harper Welwyn Whls CC
3 Emily Haycox Cardiff Ajax CC
4 Grace Garner RST Racing Team
5 Eleanor Dickinson RST Racing Team
6 Paige Milward Squadra Donne – Shutt VR
7 Sophie Williams Cardiff JIF
8 Jessica Roberts RST Racing Team
9 Elizabeth Bennett Cardiff JIF
10 Henrietta Colborne Beacon Wheelers
11 Jessie Ansell Wolverhampton Whls
12 Rhona Callander Stirling Bike Club
13 Megan Chard Bush Healthcare CRT
14 Lauren Bate-Lowe Eastlands Velo
15 Samantha Verrill Marton Race Team
16 Bethany Taylor Abergavenny Road Club
17 Sallie Birchall Lyme RC
18 Emma Borthwick Edinburgh RC

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Points Race Boys
1 Joseph Truman I-Team Cyclists’ Club
2 Jack Escritt Velocity WD-40
3 Matthew Walls Velocity WD-40
4 Joe Holt County Cycles Racing Team
5 Tom England
6 Jack Carlin Team Thomsons Cycles
7 Joel Partington Sportcity Velo
8 Karl Baillie Witham Wheelers Cycling Club
9 Rhys Britton Cardiff JIF
10 Stuart Balfour Ronde Cycling Club
11 Thomas Rotherham Sportcity Velo
12 Ellis Kirkbride Border City Wheelers CC
13 Hisham Al-Ramah VC Londres
14 Fabian Brennan Velocity WD-40
15 Reece Wood Aire Valley Racing Team
16 Jack Payne Sportcity Velo
17 Matthias Barnet Edinburgh RC
18 Luke Morgan CC Luton
19 Joey Walker RST Racing Team
20 Ben Forsyth Edinburgh RC

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Points Race Girls
1 Grace Garner RST Racing Team
2 Megan Chard Bush Healthcare CRT
3 Jessica Roberts RST Racing Team
4 Sophie Capewell Lichfield City CC
5 Lucy Shaw Solihull CC
6 Elizabeth Bennett Cardiff JIF
7 Sophie Williams Cardiff JIF
8 Eleanor Dickinson RST Racing Team
9 Monica Dew Sportcity Velo
10 Rhona Callander Stirling Bike Club
11 Henrietta Colborne Beacon Wheelers
12 Bethany Taylor Abergavenny Road Club
13 Lucy Harper Welwyn Whls CC
14 Samantha Verrill Marton Race Team
15 Jessie Ansell Wolverhampton Whls
16 Lauren Bate-Lowe Eastlands Velo
17 Emily Haycox Cardiff Ajax CC
18 Sallie Birchall Lyme RC
19 Emma Borthwick Edinburgh RC
20 Paige Milward Squadra Donne – Shutt VR

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Scratch Race Boys
1 Joel Partington Sportcity Velo
2 Joe Holt County Cycles Racing Team
3 Thomas Rotherham Sportcity Velo
4 Jack Escritt Velocity WD-40
5 Reece Wood Aire Valley Racing Team
6 Joseph Truman I-Team Cyclists’ Club
7 Tom England
8 Stuart Balfour Ronde Cycling Club
9 Karl Baillie Witham Wheelers Cycling Club
10 Rhys Britton Cardiff JIF
11 Matthew Walls Velocity WD-40
12 Hisham Al-Ramah VC Londres
13 Matthias Barnet Edinburgh RC
14 Joey Walker RST Racing Team
15 Ben Forsyth Edinburgh RC
16 Ellis Kirkbride Border City Wheelers CC
17 Luke Morgan CC Luton
18 Jack Carlin Team Thomsons Cycles
19 Jack Payne Sportcity Velo
20 Fabian Brennan Velocity WD-40

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Image www.ChrisMaher.co.uk

Future Stars Scratch Race Girls
1 Paige Milward Squadra Donne – Shutt VR
2 Jessie Ansell Wolverhampton Whls
3 Lucy Shaw Solihull CC

Scratch Race Women
1 Ciara Horne Team USN
2 Emily Kay Team USN
3 Charline Joiner Team Thomsons Cycles
4 Emily Nelson Bike Pure – LeMond – Aspire Ve…
5 Nina Kessler
6 Amy Hill Team USN

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