Rotterdam Six-Day set for exciting final fight – Watch Live Here!

Tuesday 7 January 2014 | Racing and live link starts 18:45 – 23:00 CET | Day 6

Biographies riders: http://www.sixdayracing.com/cyclists/Cyclists-Rotterdam-2014/ (click on photo’s).
Our edited highlights will be posted tomorrow with full round up and results.

 

 

Kenny De Ketele and Jasper De Buyst will begin the final day of the Rotterdam Six-Day as overall leaders. After five days, the two Belgians hold a one-lap lead three rival teams – all set to take a bonus lap and create a four-way fight.

“Our one-lap advantage doesn’t really count because all our rivals will take one as well tomorrow,” said De Buyst. “It will come down to a points’ battle. Or one couple needs to be so strong that they can take another lap. I think Niki Terpstra and Iljo Keisse are our biggest opponents, but we will also have to watch the others.”

Terpstra and Keisse count 295 points and sit in second behind the Belgians at 308 points. Danes Michael Mørkøv and Alex Rasmussen hold third place with 292 and Jens Mouris and Wim Stroetinga fourth with 185. Once a pair reaches a 100 multiple, it takes a bonus lap. The standings should guarantee a thrilling final on Tuesday night.

Best position
Terpstra and Keisse proved how strong they are in the second Madison. They took control by taking an early lap. They were able to wait after that and just countered every attack by their rivals. Eventually, the chase ended in a sprint that Mørkøv narrowly won over Terpstra.

“It was a really tough race but I’m glad we could finish it off with a strong sprint,” said Rasmussen. “This was the penultimate day so everyone tried to get in the best position possible. That’s why this win was so important.”

Belkin Boys
Theo Bos and Graeme Brown scored their first victory of the week in the opening Madison. The team Belkin riders worked hard to form the lead group and Brown won the four-way sprint. Given they lost seven laps on day one, their win failed to change the top end of the standings.

Sprint Masters
Jeffrey Hoogland enjoyed the day and the Sprint Masters title battle. With a second place in the sprint final and a victory in the handicap sprint, the Dutchman increased his overall lead. Teun Mulder finished second and third, and saw the difference grow to three points. Hoogland appears likely to win the overall tomorrow in Rotterdam.
Elite | General classification after day 5:

 

Sprint Masters | General classification after day 5:


Excitement rises in Ahoy Rotterdam – Day 4 Video & Results

Kenny De Ketele and Jasper De Buyst reclaimed the lead from Niki Terpstra and Iljo Keisse during day four of the Rotterdam Six-Day. However, two couples joined the overall fight: Jens Mouris and Wim Stroetinga, winners of the big chase, and Michael Mørkøv and Alex Rasmussen.

“It’s going to be a real fight now,” said De Ketele.

“It’s hard to control with four teams,” added team-mate De Buyst. “And the other three duos are very strong as well.”

Only points
The second Madison began as a battle between De Ketele/De Buyst and Terpstra/Keisse. However, gruelling attacks helped duos Mouris/Stroetinga and Danes Mørkøv/Rasmussen move ahead. Thanks to the lap they each gained, four couples sit on the lead lap with only points separating them.

De Ketele and De Buyst count the most at 250. Terpstra and Keisse with 243 and Mørkøv and Rasmussen with 222 stand close by. Mouris and Stroetinga count only 156 but seem to be improving.

Small chase
An exciting Madison kicked off Sunday. The lead couples kept cool and left the lower-ranked teams battle. After a fierce fight that included Kreder cousins, Vivien Brisse and Marc Hester took the win.

Sprint Masters
Jeffrey Hoogland was lucky on Sunday. Fellow overall leader Teun Mulder participated in the tandem sprint demonstration and beat Hoogland in the sprint final. However, he clearly ran out of power in the handicap sprint. He finished fourth and last.

Hoogland placed second behind Bart Hommes and reclaimed the lead. Only, one point separates the two.
Elite | General classification after day 4:

 

Sprint Masters | General classification after day 4:

 

Biographies riders: http://www.sixdayracing.com/cyclists/Cyclists-Rotterdam-2014/ (click on photo’s).

 

You can watch live each day here on Cycling Shorts, action starts tonight at 19:00 until 23:00 CET or watch our edited highlights of each night posted daily with full round up and results.

 

Rotterdam 6-Day – Terpstra and Keisse hit back hard – Day 3

Niki Terpstra and Iljo Keisse recaptured the Rotterdam Six-Day lead during the third night. The Dutch-Belgian duo lost their first spot to Kenny De Ketele and Jasper De Buyst on day two but rebounded during Saturday’s final Madison.

The defending champions sat one lap down going into final 250-lap Madison but managed to turn the tables. They won thanks to a one-lap advantage but also cracked the 200-point barrier to earn a bonus lap and to take the overall lead. They’re now one lap ahead and have more points, 204, than their closest rival De Ketele and De Buyst, 197, and Stroetinga and Mouris, 111.

Enough power
“With 250 laps it was a tough race,” said Keisse. “De Ketele and De Buyst wanted to level us and tried to take a lap in the final but fortunately we had enough power to keep up with them. In the end we kept our lead on them intact and also took an additional lap on the rest of the field.”

Easy
The leading couples took it easy during the first Madison of the night. Barry Markus and Leif Lampater won the chase. The Dutch-German duo collected enough points along the way to stay ahead of the other four couples who also took a lap.

Sprint Masters
Jeffrey Hoogland no longer sits alone on the Sprint Masters leader board. The swift Dutchman won the sprint final, but was caught by surprise in the handicap sprint. Teun Mulder attacked early and bagged the win, while Hoogland only finished third. Both men count 12 points. Mickaël Bourgain and Bart Hommes sit far behind, both with 18 points.
Elite | General classification after day 3:

 

Sprint Masters | General classification after day 3:

 

 

Biographies riders: http://www.sixdayracing.com/cyclists/Cyclists-Rotterdam-2014/ (click on photo’s).

 

You can watch live each day at: http://www.sixdayracing.com/tv  from around 7pm (CET) or watch our edited highlights of each night here on Cycling Shorts daily.

 

 

Belgians take reigns in Rotterdam Six-Day

Belgians Kenny De Ketele and Jasper Buyst took the lead from Niki Terpstra and Iljo Keisse in the Rotterdam Six-Day. Despite their rivals’ doublette, they advanced with the 200-lap Madison win in the second night of racing at the Ahoy Arena.

“We took an early lap which gave us the advantage”, said De Ketele. “We were in control for a long time but the double lap by Terpstra and Keisse put us under pressure. Fortunately, we were able to straighten things up with a late attack.”

Four couples
Four couples compete for the overall victory after two days. Terpstra and Keisse count 143 points, Mørkøv and Rasmussen 112 and Mouris and Stroetinga 68. However, they all sit one lap behind De Ketele and De Buyst, who have 151.

Bad change
De Ketele and De Buyst missed an opportunity to take the lead earlier in the night due to a bad hand sling in the super sprint. Their rivals eliminated them halfway in the race. Terpstra and Keisse were already out of the event at that time.

Sprint Masters
Jeffrey Hoogland heads into the weekend as the leader in the Sprint Masters. The Dutchman retained his top spot thanks to a second place in the sprint final. Frenchman Mickaël Bourgain claimed the win. Teun Mulder is Hoogland’s biggest challenger. Hoogland, who won the keirin bronze medal at the Olympics, sits only one point down. Bart Hommes occupies the third place with a two-point gap.

Elite | General classification after day 2:

Sprint Masters | General classification after day 2:

 

Biographies riders: http://www.sixdayracing.com/cyclists/Cyclists-Rotterdam-2014/ (click on photo’s).

 

You can watch live each day at: http://www.sixdayracing.com/tv  from around 7pm (CET) or watch our edited highlights of each night here on Cycling Shorts daily.

 

 

Champions – Terpstra & Keisse Start Strongly In Rotterdam 6-Day

With 26 world-ranked Six-Day riders forming 13 teams, we will be bringing you a spectacular cycling event from Rotterdam.

Rotterdam Six-Day line-up:

1. Terpstra Niki NED / Keisse Iljo BEL
2. Mouris Jens NED / Stroetinga Wim NED
3. Havik Yoeri NED / Stöpler Nick NED
4. Hester Marc DEN / Brisse Vivien FRA
5. Marvulli Franco SUI / Marguet Tristan SUI
6. De Ketele Kenny BEL / De Buyst Jasper BEL
7. Markus Barry NED / Lampater Leif GER
8. Mørkøv Michael DEN / Rasmussen Michael DEN
9. Bartko Robert GER / Kalz Marcel GER
10. Bos Theo NED / Brown Graeme AUS
11. East Guy USA / Holloway Daniel USA
12. Kreder Michel NED / Kreder Wesley NED
13. Boskamp Melvin NED / Asselman Jesper NED
14. Zwet van der Arno NED / Hoffmann Nolan RSA
15. Caspers Didier NED / Zijl van Melvin NED

Niki Terpstra and Iljo Keisse started strongly in the 32nd Six Days of Rotterdam. Last year’s winners ended the first day in the Ahoy Arena in the same spot where they finished one year ago. Michael Mørkøv and Alex Rasmussen, winners of the final Madison, sit second at nine points down, 81 to 72.

Couples Kenny De Ketele and Jasper Buyst (57 points) and Jens Mouris and Wim Stroetinga (24) are the only others on the same lap as the leaders.

One step ahead
Terpsta and Keisse proved yet again that they are a force to be reckoned with this week by riding two strong Madisons. During the second, the Omega Pharma-Quick-Step riders were constantly one step ahead of the competition but were left with only a fourth place – one lap down. Thanks to a second place in the first Madison, behind Franco Marvulli and Tristan Marguet, but with a lap advantage over the rest of the field and victories in the derny race and the super elimination race they seized the overall lead.

“The first big Madison of a Six-Day is always important,” said Keisse. “We might have lost a lap but we laid our cards on the table. I think it was a good day.” Terpstra agreed with his Belgian partner. “The first place is the best place to be in. Now we have to defend that position.”

Sprint Masters
Jeffrey Hoogland led the sprint field. During the first evening, the swift Dutchman bagged only three penalty points. Teun Mulder and Bart Hommes received one and two more respectively. French Mickaël Bourgain collected eight points.

 

Biographies riders: http://www.sixdayracing.com/cyclists/Cyclists-Rotterdam-2014/ (click on photo’s).

 

You can watch live each day at: http://www.sixdayracing.com/tv  or watch our edited highlights of each night here on Cycling Shorts daily.

The Six Day’s… Leave them alone – Minty’s Ramblings

Tom Murray - Image © Anna Magrath Cycling Shorts.

This winter I set off to the Gent, Six days full of enthusiasm and excitement, its somewhere I have great memories off, somewhere I have passed down many a story about to my friends, family and anyone else who would listen. But there is a problem, a worry stuck in my head I think the world needs to know, but first I better tell you why I qualify to worry about the six days.

The Kuipke track has always been close to my heart, in truth it’s the whole reason I got to ride a bike for a living. As a young kid my parents took me across to Gent to watch the six day with Ben Swift I remember us both sitting there staring in amazement as the six day rolled on and on into the early hours of the night and the party in the middle of the track got more and more wild and out of hand. I made a decision there and then that I wanted to ride the six days, I wanted a piece of that atmosphere to be part of the whole circus, it felt a lot more than just a bike race is was entertaining and a real show.

The thought of riding at Kuipke in the six days didn’t leave me and a few years later I moved to Gent to live with a Belgian family in the heart of cycling land. Riding for the Kingsnorth International team I spent three years riding on the kermis circuit out in Belgium, a great experience. One that taught me how to be a racing cyclist in truth and in 2007 I was finally lucky enough to get an invitation to ride the Noel Fore Memorial event on the Kuipke track. It had taken some getting there but I had made it onto the track in Gent. Even better was that after a good performance riding with Peter Williams against mostly national squads we received an invitation to the UIV amateur six days of Gent. It was the best news ever; I was to be involved in some small way in the six days! I remember the six nights well, it was hard, a real learning experience, some nights went well others went awful but it didn’t really matter I was part of the six day show, full of adrenaline and excitement.

After that first amateur six day, over the next three years I was lucky enough to ride twice more in Gent and once in Amsterdam, Dortmund and in between took in International events in Alkmaar, Munich and on the new Eddy Merckx track in Gent. Every event was a new experience, a new place, different people a proper adventure, you didn’t always know how you would get from place to place. Once along with Tom Smith I was stuffed in the back of Iljo Keisse’s car along with his huge number six flower after been left stranded in Amsterdam! But that was all part of been immersed in the six day circuit. Although I never got to step up to the professional six day circuit I am happy that for a small while I was part of it, even if that part was pretty small.

So what’s my problem? Well, the atmosphere at Gent this year was pretty subdued, the showmen or orchestrator of the sixes seemed to have disappeared (granted Keisse who is probably the current star of the sixes wasn’t able to take part) and the crowd seemed more interested in the bar than the track. My theory on the reason for this is the changing face of track racing, something that was once fairly individual that didn’t rely on you been in a big backed trade team or part of a national set up now seems to be exactly that. Add to this the exclusion of the Madison from the Olympic Games and it seems like while track racing is becoming universally more popular and important the six days is not been pulled along with it.

In my last year of riding the amateur six days it became more difficult to gain an entry as a result of not been the ‘national’ selection of your country, it had changed from riders who had done it off their own backs, who wanted to be there and be part of it, people who travelled in the back of transit vans from event to event all to be part of the six day circus to deadly serious national selections who the majority of the time while respecting the events were gearing up for bigger and better things on an international stage. This year when I went back and saw the UIV amateur six it was exclusively national selection teams, that’s not that there’s a problem with those riders I’m sure they want to be there and enjoy the experience but in reality there going to move on from the six day circuit to focus on World Championships, Olympic Disciplines or a road career, leaving little for the professional six day circuit to pick from when they look for new riders.

I think that’s the problem, while as the sport gains in popularity the professional six day’s may have to come in line with new format’s that interest a wider audience but the amateur six days should always allow entries from those who have their own dreams and ambitions and follow them. These people are where your characters come from after all. The current six day star Iljo Keisse grew up riding on Kuipke, his dad owns a bar just round the corner from it, he’s a true six day rider who grew up watching the six days and wanted to be part of that, take away the possibility of that happening and in effect your killing the six days slowly. True there are still some rides left, Franco Marvulli and Danny Stam spring to mind, but what happens when they have hung up the wheels, where are the next true six day riders coming from?

Sport’s grow, evolve and change, the UCI in their wisdom have proved this by booting the Madison and individual pursuits out but some things should stay the same for their own good.

 

Minty

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

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