Matrix Fitness Grand Prix 2016 – Motherwell

Images ©CyclingShorts.cc/www.chrismaher.co.uk

 

Woaw! A Big Deal for Eileen Roe as she seals her first win of 2016 in Round One of the Matrix Fitness GP in Scotland, wining a four-way sprint up-to the finish-line for Lares.

Round one of the Matrix Fitness Grand Prix took place in Motherwell this year. One of six-in-the-series, saw former National Circuit Champion and Scottish local Eileen Roe take the victory in a four-way sprint up-to the finish-line to the cheers of a home crowd.

Now riding for Belgium outfit Lares-Waowdeal on the continent, Eileen had wanted to returned home, feeling a little lonely after a nine-week stint in Europe. Being the only fluent English speaking girl on the squad, rode the first Women’s Lincoln Grand Prix on the weekend before finishing tenth, behind winner Alice Barnes, Drops Cycling Team, and Nikki Juniper, Team Ford Ecoboost who came in seventh.

It was Barnes that initiated the first move in Motherwell after Aprire-HSS Hire, Team WNT and Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa drove the peloton for a couple of laps of the relatively square one-point-two-kilometre-circuit that finished with a long drag from the bottom final corner.

Juniper had counter-attacked and Roe knew which girls she had to look out for. She had seen how well Barnes rode to victory at Lincoln, and decided to go with group, with Annasley Park, Team Breeze joining them as the peloton strung apart, they soon built up a fifteen second lead.

The race was run over forty-five minutes with five final count-down laps to the finish line.

With two laps to go there was a pile up which unfortunately took out Mel Lowther who was later taken to hospital to be checked over.

The four leading riders increased to a twenty-five second gap on the chasing group as they started passing back-markers. An aggressive ride by Barnes also saw her claiming the two sprints and the jersey along the way.

It looked at one point like the main peloton would reel-them-in with Podium Ambitions Gabby Shaw and Lauren Creamer chasing hard, and Jo Tindley and Lydia Boylan, Team WNT  taking over, but the impetus went off and the four extended their lead.

With the final laps quickly approaching, the girls started looking across at each-others moves, trying to anticipate who would be their biggest rival.

As the final one-hundred meters marker pasted, it was Eileen that kicked the hardest to win the second visit to the Motherwell round on the Matrix Fitness GP.

Interview – Eileen Roe Matrix Fitness GP Motherwell 2016 Winner by Cycling Shorts

Chris Maher of CyclingShorts.cc catches up with the delightful Eileen Roe after her solo effort at round two of the Matrix Fitness GP in Motherwell.

Talking to Eileen after the race she had said, “There was a rider represented from each team” in their group, and she though if they worked together, they would say away to the end”. 

“I guess that they weren’t bothered about myself because the Tour Series is all about the “team” this year. So I think they were happy to have me along with them and contributing to the work”.

She went on to say that she wouldn’t be contesting any more of the Matrix Series as she returning back to her own team duties shortly before starting a big block of European racing on the continent. Firstly a big 1.1 UCI event in Belgium, the Gooik-Geraardsbergen-Gooik on May 29th, from then-on it continues every week, she went on to say.

This is Eileen’s first win of the season, finishing third in the recent Dwars door Vlaanderen.

 

Results:

Team Classification & Overall after Round One

Rank Team Points

1 Drops Cycling Team 98

2 Team Breeze 79

3 Team Ford Ecoboost 78

4 Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa 70

5 Team WNT 52

6 Aprire HSS Hire 25

7 Velo Schils – Interbike RT 23

8 Sunsport Velo 21

 

Sprint 1

1 100 Alice Barnes Drops Cycling Team 5

2 147 Annasley Park Team Breeze 4

3 256 Eileen Roe Lares Waowdeals 3

4 180 Nikki Juniper Team Ford Ecoboost 2

5 27 Jo Tindley Team WNT 1

 

Sprint 2

1 100 Alice Barnes Drops Cycling Team 5

2 256 Eileen Roe Lares Waowdeals 4

3 147 Annasley Park Team Breeze 3

4 180 Nikki Juniper Team Ford Ecoboost 2

5 27 Jo Tindley Team WNT 1

 

Sprints Classification & Overall after Round One

1 100 Alice Barnes Drops Cycling Team 10

2 256 Eileen Roe Lares Waowdeals 7

3 147 Annasley Park Team Breeze 7

4 180 Nikki Juniper Team Ford Ecoboost 4

5 27 Jo Tindley Team WNT 2

 

Individual Round Classification

Rank – Bib – Name – Team – Race Time – Laps Completed – Points

1 256 Eileen Roe Lares Waowdeals 0:46:02.227 24 40

2 100 Alice Barnes Drops Cycling Team 0:46:02.404 24 38

3 180 Nikki Juniper Team Ford Ecoboost 0:46:02.803 24 36

4 147 Annasley Park Team Breeze 0:46:02.817 24 34

5 102 Ellie Dickinson Drops Cycling Team 0:46:10.183 24 32

6 20 Lydia Boylan Team WNT 0:46:10.751 24 30

7 142 Hayley Jones Team Breeze 0:46:11.007 24 29

8 109 Annie Simpson Drops Cycling Team 0:46:11.495 24 28

9 2 Lauren Creamer Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa0:46:12.406 24 27

10 11 Gabriella Shaw Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa0:46:12.605 24 26

11 65 Louise Laker Aprire HSS Hire 0:46:12.661 24 25

12 182 Charlotte Broughton Team Ford Ecoboost 0:46:13.067 24 24

13 120 Lou Collins Velo Schils – Interbike RT 0:46:13.164 24 23

14 27 Jo Tindley Team WNT 0:46:15.979 24 22

15 205 Alice Sharpe Sunsport Velo 0:40:18.392 24 21

16 243 Neah Evans Scotland Cycling Team 0:46:53.406 24 20

17 110 Abi Van Twisk Drops Cycling Team 0:46:59.443 24 19

18 183 Henrietta Colborne Team Ford Ecoboost 0:47:00.483 24 18

19 4 Amy Gornall Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa0:47:00.952 24 17

20 143 Emily Kay Team Breeze 0:47:14.119 24 16

21 3 Grace Garner Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa0:48:09.436 24 15

22 187 Charline Joiner Team Ford Ecoboost 0:45:43.561 23 14

23 28 Hannah Walker Team WNT 0:45:43.972 23 13

24 160 Madison Campbell Team Footon Velosport 0:45:44.071 23 12

25 106 Rose Osbourne Drops Cycling Team 0:45:46.540 23 11

26 47 Jenny Holl Team Jadan-Weldtite 0:45:49.554 23 10

27 85 Kelly Murphy Boot Out Breast Cancer Cycling Club0:45:57.220 23 9

28 163 Suzetta Guerrini Team Footon Velosport 0:46:13.646 23 8

29 68 Gemma Sargent Aprire HSS Hire 0:40:13.426 20 7

30 203 Josie Knight Sunsport Velo 0:40:14.430 20 6

31 184 Julie Erskine Team Ford Ecoboost 0:40:15.218 20 5

32 61 Lucy Chittenden Aprire HSS Hire 0:40:16.366 20 4

33 208 Genevieve Whitson Sunsport Velo 0:40:16.870 20 3

34 206 Maddy Scott Sunsport Velo 0:40:17.026 20 2

35 84 Nikola Matthews Boot Out Breast Cancer Cycling Club0:40:18.558 20 1

36 82 Monica Dew Boot Out Breast Cancer Cycling Club0:40:18.574 20

37 246 Tanya Griffths Starley Racing 0:40:30.932 20

38 126 Nicola Soden Velo Schils – Interbike RT 0:41:02.256 20

39 41 Sarah Bradford Team Jadan-Weldtite 0:41:15.743 20

40 21 Sam Burman Team WNT 0:41:23.097 20

41 44 Rhona Callander Team Jadan-Weldtite 0:41:23.302 20

42 200 Eileen Burns Sunsport Velo 0:41:32.233 20

43 124 Sandra MacKay Velo Schils – Interbike RT 0:39:56.977 19

44 123 Katherine Kimber Velo Schils – Interbike RT 0:40:32.075 19

45 121 Caroline Guest Velo Schils – Interbike RT 0:41:12.207 19

46 80 Ellie Coster Boot Out Breast Cancer Cycling Club0:39:46.289 18

47 83 Kristy Howells Boot Out Breast Cancer Cycling Club0:40:41.746 17

 

Non-finishers

146 Melissa Lowther Team Breeze

25 Keira McVitty Team WNT

9 Katie Prankerd Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa

 

A Woman’s Guide to Racing – Part 7 – Circuit Racing

 

A Woman’s Guide to Racing – Part 7

Circuit Racing

Following on from my guides to racing that I first wrote back in 2013, I thought it would be useful to develop these a bit further.  This guide is on circuit racing and what to expect, as it is this type of race that you will tend to do as a novice first, before venturing out on to the open road in road races.

Licences

These races tend (on the whole) to be run under British Cycling regulations.  This means that you will have to have a racing licence to participate in the event, but you don’t need to have a licence in advance to race for circuit races (unless it is a National Series event, in which case you won’t be able to ride as a novice).  However, you will be required to purchase a day licence for the event, so that you are covered by the requisite insurance. A day licence costs around £10 and will be in addition to your entry fee.  You can find out more about the racing licence position here.

What is involved?

A circuit race can also be called a criterium.  They are held usually on a circuit of 1 mile or less, with the newer circuits averaging around 1km in length.  More often than not, the race distance will be described in terms of minutes rather than laps, with many races being a certain amount of time plus a number of laps.  Generally, the commissaires will know how long a lap takes and will tell you in advance that they expect the race to be however many laps but they will put the lap board up with a certain number of laps to go (usually 10, although this depends on the length of the circuit).

O

Who can enter?

This tends to depend on the organiser.  There are many events which are labelled as E/1/2/3/4 and will therefore be band 4 races (this doesn’t mean that Laura Trott or Dani King is going to turn up – they could, but it doesn’t happen very often), however if categories are dropped and the race only caters for lower categories (e.g. 2/3/4 or 3/4) the race will become a band 5, meaning that there are less licence points available for the top 10 finishers.  There has also been a tendency in the past to hold women’s races alongside a fourth category men’s race.  This can be a bit scary, for many reasons, so if you are looking at doing your first event, check to see whether it is a standalone women’s event or whether the women’s event will be on the track at the same time as the fourth category men’s event, as even though they are listed as separate events on the British Cycling events listing, they may have the same or similar start times, which will mean that you are racing at the same time as the men.

Warming up

The nature of circuit races mean that they tend to start extremely quickly, and you therefore need to make sure that you warm up properly before the event.  Most riders nowadays tend to take their rollers or turbo trainer to the race so that they can do some efforts before the race – the key to the warm up is that you need to get your heart rate up to where it will probably be in the race when you warm up, so you will usually need around 20 to 30 mins warm up, although this depends on the rider.  You should be looking to finish your warm up around 10 minutes before you are due to start to give you time to get the final pieces ready, so make sure you have put your number on in advance of warming up.  It also helps to warm up in a separate T-shirt to that which you are going to race in, so make sure you take a couple of T-shirts in your race bag with you.

Before you get on the start line

The riders will all line up on the start line, so if possible try and do a couple of laps of the circuit before the race is due to start.  During these laps, look at the corners, see whether there are any damp patches or pot holes which you may want to avoid, and ride around any particularly tricky sections a couple of times before the race so that there are no hidden horrors which you might encounter.  Check which way the wind is blowing – is it a head wind up the finishing straight or is it a tail wind or a cross wind, as this will give you an idea where riders will be likely to put an attack in (most are less likely to attack in a head wind because it’s too hard on their own).

O

The race itself

Remember that the more experienced riders will always go off hard and keep the pace high for a couple of laps.  Keep calm during the first few laps, even though your head might be trying to tell you other things, as the pace always eases off after the first 5 to 10 minutes.  Many riders will try and attack in these early laps as they test each other out, but most of these attacks won’t stay away as they’re more like feints – it’s like a game of poker as the more experienced riders see who’s up for a race and who isn’t.

Corners are either your friend or your enemy

Most riders don’t like cornering and will brake excessively.  Most crashes tend to happen coming out of corners in circuit races, so give yourself room but don’t ease off too much.  Make sure you change into an easier gear going into the corner as it’s easier to change pace on a lower gear and therefore easier to sprint out of the bend.  Don’t make the mistake of staying in the same gear as it will just tire you out.  Hold your line around a corner and don’t “divebomb” other riders (cut up the rider behind you).  Become a rider who loves corners and you will do well.

cornering

You will get dropped

Every rider will get left behind by the first few riders (the term is to “get dropped”) in their first few races.  No matter what you think as you prepare for your first race, 99% of riders struggle with the fluctuating pace and it is only a matter of time before the elastic eventually snaps and you get dropped.  But don’t worry, it is all part of the learning curve, and the next time you come back you will have a better idea of what happens and what to expect.

Don’t give up

Bike racing can be an extremely demoralising experience but don’t worry, everybody goes through that learning curve.  Make sure you set yourself targets (finish the race, finish in the bunch, finish in the top 10) and you will find that it can be an exciting experience!

Click below to read:
Part One – Where Do I Start?
Part Two – What Do I Enter?
Part Three – What training should I do?
Part Four – Practice! Practice! Practice!
Part Five – Are You Ready To Race?
Part Six – Race Day

2015 Epic Cycles Women’s Race Team

In a big step for Women’s Cycling, Epic Cycles-Scott Women’s Race Team announced yesterday their plans to help move the sport and their team forward. Here’s what’s in store for 2015:

Over the past three seasons Epic Cycles and Scott Sports have been the two main sponsors for the successful Epic Cycles-Scott Women’s Race Team. Going into 2015 we will see one or two changes in sponsorship, but with the same team management and owners. A new team name will also be announced soon.

One feature of the team over the past three years has been its evolving terms of reference – in years one and two the emphasis was very much on the development of junior riders, while in year three the focus has been on bringing together a balanced and talented group of senior riders with the aim of riding together as a cohesive team, rather than as a collection of individuals.

This evolution will continue in year four, with renewed focus on rider development and a primary aim to act as a path into the professional ranks and/or competing in UCI races for those with ambitions to do so.

To support this aim we are working closely with the newly announced Matrix-Vulpine UCI Team. Our joint expectation is that a number of our riders will have the opportunity through this relationship to ride with the Matrix team as stagiaires in UCI races during the 2015 season, offering them the chance both to race in the pro peloton and to demonstrate what they could offer to a UCI pro team.

We also aim to build on our successes in the area of team work, and will be targeting key events in the UK domestic road racing scene, with a view to building on our list of 2014 victories and podium places.

The team will, as in 2014, be managed in a professional manner and we hope to further contribute to raising the standard of women’s race team management in the UK.

Key Aims

  • To provide team environment and structure in which riders can develop and progress, either to riding at a higher level within the UK scene or to a career as a professional cyclist.
  • To build on the number of podium places achieved in key UK races during 2014.
  • To provide opportunities to take part in UCI races and gain exposure within the pro peloton.
  • To raise the profile of our riders, team, and sponsors.

The Team

While we anticipate that some of this year’s line-up will be moving on to new teams, we are hoping to retain a number of our existing riders for 2015.

In signing new riders we are aiming, as in 2014, to assemble a strong and ambitious team who have complementary strengths and skills, so that we are able to enter races with different leaders and tactics according to the nature and timing of each race.

As in previous years, the team will not been built around a single star rider or to specialise in a particular type of race. Instead, we will aim to perform consistently well in all types of road racing, throughout the entire season.

Our planned team size of around 10 riders should provide sufficient cover for key events, while maximising the opportunity for individual riders to participate in a full programme of races without too many occasions where we have more riders than places available.

Our preference is for the team to be made up of a mix of over and under 23 seniors, but we do not have a rigid age or experience profile in mind. It is anticipated that most/all will be in some form of employment or education – full time availability to race is not a requirement.

A track record of participation and progression in road racing is essential. Previous race success (in terms of podium spots) is secondary to a positive attitude and a commitment to team work.

Epic Cycles-Scott Women’s Race Team

Hayley Davies

Hayley Davies

Writer

Riding since Feb 2011 Hayley is a 30 year old female who loves adventures. If she’s not on one of her many bikes or in the water on a bodyboard/surfboard, then Hayley is probably out looking for something new to keep the adrenaline pumping!
Website: www.hjdonline.co.uk

Shrewsbury Grand Prix – Equal Prize Money for Men & Women

There’s a new race in town on 25 May 2014 and it promises to be something quite special.

If you were thinking about the Milk Race and are now worried that you might not get a ride, then do not fear, because help is here in the form of Shrewsbury Grand Prix.

But that doesn’t mean that it is any less worthy than the Milk Race – the Shrewsbury Grand Prix boasts equal prize money for men and women – and with a prize fund of £1,300 for the women’s race alone, it looks set to be a great event with equally great prizes!  This is a fantastic opportunity for the women, as it is likely that the top riders will be at the Milk Race due to the potential TV coverage for their sponsors.

Shrewsbury GP flyerThe event has a dedicated Facebook page and Twitter account and has also produced a promotional video

So what prizes are on offer?  The British Cycling link to the event (where you can also enter) has the details, but to whet your appetite, I can confirm the details are as follows:

Pure Communications Women Only

£1300 Prize Fund

1st £500 + Set of Bontrager Race Wheels RRP £250 + Pair of Tifosi Podium Glasses RRP £60

2nd £300 + Pair of Tifosi Podium Glasses RRP £60

3rd £150 + Pair of Tifosi Podium Glasses RRP £60

4th £100     5th £80     6th £60     7th £40     8th £30     9th £20     10th £10

 

Cooper Green Amateur Crit (for 2nd/3rd/4th category men)

race schedule£400 Prize Fund

1st £100 + £150 Altura Clothing Voucher + Pair of Tifosi Podium Glasses RRP £60

2nd £80 + Pair of Tifosi Podium Glasses RRP £60

3rd £60 + Pair of Tifosi Podium Glasses RRP £60

4th £50     5th £35     6th £25     7th £15     8th £15     9th £10     10th £10

 

Stan Cycles Pro Crit (for Elite/1st/2nd/3rd cat men)

£1300 Prize Fund

1st £500 + Cateye GPS Computer RRP £90 + + Pair of Tifosi Podium Glasses RRP £60

2nd £300 + Pair of Tifosi Podium Glasses RRP £60

3rd £150 + Pair of Tifosi Podium Glasses RRP £60

4th £100     5th £80     6th £60     7th £40     8th £30     9th £20     10th £10

In addition there is a £600 prize fund available for primes within the 3 races.

Thats a total cash prze fund of £3,600!!!

The organiser, Ben Lawrence, has a set of great sponsors – Stan’s Cycles, Pure Communications, Cooper Green Pooks (Estate Agents), and Beaumont Lawrence (Chartered Insurance Brokers) who have supported the event by providing these fantastic prizes.

For further information relating to the race schedule and the course layout, see below:

The event looks set to be a great afternoon, and there are plans to get the family involved, which will really make a great day.  Keep up to date with the event on their Facebook and Twitter accounts and let’s hope the event gets the support that it most definitely deserves!

Review: Classic Cycling Race Routes: The Toughest 52 European Challenges

 

Classic Cycling Race Routes

The Toughest 52 European Challenges
by Chris Sidwells

Reviewed by Nick Dey

Classic Cycling Race Routes: The Toughest 52 European Challenges - By Chris Sidwells

Published: 15th October 2013

£25 hardback

AA Publishing in association with Garmin

An inspiring book to read and then to ride… if you dare!

This inspiring hardback book presents a selection of the most challenging and rewarding routes for road and racing cyclists. From the South Downs Epic and Tour of the Peak in the UK, to Paris-Roubaix in France and Tour of Flanders in Belgium, from Gruyere Cycling Tour in Switzerland and Tour of Lombardy in Italy to the San Sebastian Classic in Spain, this book is the ultimate motivation for cyclists who want to push themselves to the next level.

The fifty-two classic European cycling routes – one ride for each week of the year – selected to appear in this weighty A4 hard backed tome of well over two-hundred pages cater for the aspiring and experienced cyclist as well as those more romantically inclined, inspired as they are by the epic routes raced by the legends of the sport.

Experience an example… The Retro Ronde.The routes have derived their inspiration from the many professional races as well as the ever growing mass-participation events, the cyclosportives. Indeed the twenty-four routes that cover the UK and Ireland are exclusively ‘sportive in scope.  I’m ashamed to report that I have ridden only one … but can vouch for the books accuracy; I was indeed Flat Out in the Fens! Several of the European events feature in the World Cycling Tour: an age group series in which participants have the chance to qualify for and compete in an age-group final. You, yes you, could become a World Champion!

 

Route 34, pp148-150, covers the outstanding Retro Ronde*

I rode this in 2013 and am happy to state without hyperbole that it is my absolute favourite cycling experience, second to none – full review coming soon to Cycling Shorts (Ed. I promise!)

 

Here I am… climbing ‘The Wall’ Retro Ronde 2013

Here I am… climbing ‘The Wall’ Retro Ronde 2013

 

In the book the route distance is correctly stated as 100 km (I managed 112 km but did get myself lost taking in a few extra Heligen!) but the total climbing was very different to my experience. The book states 525 m however I managed 1200 m. To be fair to the author the organisers fine tune their route each year – and I did do the extra cobbled climbs! All the other information is accurate and succeeds in conveying the flavour of the experience. For experience the Retro Ronde certainly is! I shall be back every year – or as long as the old bike, and even older legs will allow. If you do plan on riding try to make a long weekend of it. The ‘Crit’, ahem, racing on the Saturday is wholly authentic yet rather tongue in cheek, and well worth the entry fee of €5!

Posing for the official photo at the start… the atmosphere was the best I have experienced.

Posing for the official photo at the start… the atmosphere was the best I have experienced.

 

So how does this fine book present the information?

The book in a nutshell …

  • 52 European cyclosportive and Grand Tour routes
  • Full-colour route maps with directions and elevation profiles
  • Advice on ride strategies and techniques
  • Tips on training, appropriate clothing, nutrition and fitness
  • All routes are available to download for your GPS cycling computer
  • Routes cover the UK & Ireland, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and Spain.

The author suggests the reader takes two possible approaches, both of which allow them to make full use of the route information. The first, and Sidwells strongly suggests this as the most preferable avenue, is to take part in the official event for each route (if there is one) as, and I can only concur with him in this respect, …
“…the atmosphere and camaraderie of these events, where thousands of like-minded souls take part, all enjoying doing something they love, is incredible.”
Additionally, there is also more than enough information within the book to allow you to ride each route, or your own variation of it, independently of the official event and at any time of year. Words to the wise… check before you leave that roads are open!
Each route is clearly described and supported with often fascinating background information along with tantalising titbits of history; and who amongst us hasn’t unleashed the inner child and ridden a classic imagining the spectres of the greats; Coppi, Bobbet, Garin, et al, riding alongside?
There are maps and directions for each route, including profiles that clearly indicate where each hill is located along with rather useful yet often unsettling detail on how long and steep they are! The ever useful height gain is also presented.
In the words of the author, Chris Sidwells, “Enjoy the book, use it for planning and setting objectives, but above all get out and ride these routes. They represent some of the finest cycling experiences you could ever have.”
Classic Cycling Routes in a little more detail …
The introduction is extensive and covers three very important pre-ride requisites: Basic equipment – your bike, creating a training plan, and challenge-ride nutrition. There is a lot of very useful information here ranging from how to best use a GPS device (by Garmin) to the basics of creating a training plan.
The two-hundred pages devoted to the fifty two Race Routes traverse Europe through seven countries but with the majority set in the UK and Ireland.

The UK & Ireland section contains twenty-four routes, as listed below:
Etape Caledonia
The Cyclone
The Fred Whitton Challenge
Etape Pennines
The Ryedale Rumble
Etape du Dales
The Cheshire Cat
Tour of the Peak
The Shropshire Mynd
Flat Out in the Fens
Hell of the North Cotswolds
The Ups and Downs
The Lionheart
The New Forest Epic
The South Downs Epic
The Tour of Wessex
The Exmoor Beast
The Dartmore Classic
Cornwall Tor
Etape Cymru
The Dragon Ride
The Giant’s Causeway Coast Sportive
Tour of Sligo
Malin to Mizen

France:
Paris-Roubaix Challenge
Paris-Tours
Megève Mont Blanc
L’Ardéchoise Marathon
La Marmotte
Cinglés du Ventoux
Etape du Tour 2010

Belgium:
Tour of Flanders
Gent-Wevelgem
Retro Ronde
Grand Fondo Eddy Merckx
Liege-Bastogne-Liege
Holland
The Amstell Gold Race

Germany:
Vattenfall Cyclassics
Switzerland
Gruyére Cycling Tour
Alpenbrevet Platinum Tour

Italy:
Tour of Lombardy
Milan-San Remo
A Stage of the Tour of Italy
La Leggendaria Charly Gaul
Maratona dles Dolomites
La Pinarello Cycling Marathon
L’Eroica

Spain:
San Sebastian Classic
Quebrantahuesos
Val d’Aran Cycling Tour
A Stage of the Vuelta
La Pico del Veleta

Don’t forget… all routes in this book can be downloaded to your Garmin (the Edge 800 in my case) from the AA website.

AA Website

In conclusion…

As the book itself says, ‘the classic race routes selected here are not for the faint-hearted. Based on the best cyclosportive events in Europe and on stages of Grand Tours, they are much more than just pretty rides in the country. The fifty-two routes are serious mental and physical challenges (in the case of the Retro Ronde… the liver is called upon to do its bit too!) that require training and preparation. Yet each is accessible and achieved by many thousands of amateur cyclists each year.

Classic Cycling Race Routes allows you to cycle these rides at any time, either as preparation for the race events, or for the sheer joy and exhilaration of the challenge. For those rides that don’t have a dedicated cyclosportive route, the author has designed a ride a ride to reflect the demands and history of the race.

Each route contains a map with directions and an elevations and an elevation profile, and Chris Sidwells provides an overview combining ride strategy and techniques with the history of the race.

Practical and aspirational, Classic Cycling Race Routes will inspire a new generation of cyclists to push themselves to the extreme. You never know, the next Chris Froome, Mark Cavendish or Sir Bradley Wiggins may well be among them!

One for the rider as well as the reader + GPS routes = 100% Awarded our Star Buy Rating!
Cycling Shorts Star Rating Classic Cycling Race Routes By Chris Sidwells
Reviewed by: Nichiless ‘Nicky’ Dey.
Neunkirchen-Seelscheid, Germany


About the author

Chris Sidwells is an internationally-respected British cycling journalist and author, with nine books on cycling, ranging from biography through fitness and training to bike repair. His Complete Bike Book has been translated into twenty-four languages, and his Bike Repair Manual is about to reach its fifth edition. Tour Climbs and Race for Madmen were best sellers in their genre. His The Official Tour de France Recordshas the backing of Le Tour Itself. Most recently he has published The Long Race for Glory: How the British Came to Rule the Cycling World… the next book to be reviewed on Cycling Shorts. Chris’s words and photographs have graced the pages of Britain’s best-selling cycling  magazine Cycling Weekly (indeed he seems to appear in every issue,) and in all issues of Cycle Sport and Cycling Active, along with Cycling Fitness. He has also been published in Men’s Fitness, Cycling Plus, GQ, Running Fitness and the Sunday Times. Phew!

 

 

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