British Cycling National Time Trial Championships 2016

Stockton-On-Tees

Dowsett, Simmonds And Davies Back Up Their Twenty-Fifteen Titles Here In Stockton-On-Tees In The National Time Trial Championships 2016 Defending champion Alex Dowsett [Movistar] successfully reclaims his Time Trial National Jersey in Stockton-On-Tees for an impressive fifth senior title. Setting the quickest first split, Dowsett was the odd-on favorite around the circuit through the High Street, along the Riverside and out of town before returning for another three laps. James Gullen [Pedal Heaven] posted the closest time for Silver over a minute down and Ryan Perry [Langdale Lightweights RT] the Bronze. Talking in-front of the assembled cheering crowd Dowsett praised Stockton Council on their circuit layout and organization.

The whole Town Centre aspect of time-trialing is really something quite incredible. (Last year’s circuit was on a partly closed circuit at Cadwell Park Racing circuit near Louth, Lincolnshire) The atmosphere was really great, even out of town there were a lot of people watching. I think the course suited the spectator crowd, so Stockton should be proud of what they put on today.

For me personally I paced it I’d say, as perfectly as I could.

The gap to second last year was a lot bigger. I’ve seen these guys at 10s this year and it’s great to see British time-trialing really coming up.

Alex Dowsett

British National Time Trial Champion 2016, Movistar

When Alex was asked about another hour record attempt in the near future:  I hope so, the bar has been set quite high by Wiggins (Bradley). I know I’m capable of it from the numbers from the last attempt. It’s just a question of when. 54k is not a distance to taking lightly. It’s a huge ask from my team [Movistar] as well to set it up. It takes months to set up. I can’t see it happening this year, but possibly for next year.

 

Hayley Simmonds successfully defended her first National title from twenty-fifteen backing up her win having spent most of the year riding abroad riding her first professional contract.

Back on her beloved Cervelo P5, Simmonds put over half a minute on her closest on-form rival Claire Rose [Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa] who took Silver, with Team-mate Dame Sarah Storey close behind for Bronze.

Cycling Shorts: What have you been up to recently?

SimmondsWith-in the last couple of weeks I’ve recently changed Teams. I was riding professionally for Unitedhealthcare, I made the decision when they offered me, to be let out of my contract, so I accepted that. I made the decision to ride for Aerocoach. 

It was a really hard decision to leave the team. I had to weigh-up in my mind, was I prepared to potentially sacrifice defending my title today to remain on the team.

I decided that I wasn’t and that defending my title today probably meant more to me.

I want to return to a UCI team, I want to be a professional bike rider.

Hopefully I’ll be able to find a UCI team for next year.

I’m lucky that I managed to find some guest rides in UCI races for the later part of the year. So I will still be keeping my hand in UCI races.

Cycling Shorts: How did you find the course here in Stockton-On-Tees and did it suit you?

SimmondsI didn’t think it suited me. When I looked at the course before, I didn’t think it suited me as much as last year’s course did. But it was a good course. It was a really interesting course. It was a course of two parts.

It had a technical bit in the town centre and the dual carriageway section that was more of a traditional time trial course.

The bit in the town centre was actually really good in terms of support from local people and I was lucky enough to meet some of the local people a couple of weeks ago when I first came to look at the course.

The support was great and yeh! It suited me enough.

 

Interview – Hayley Simmonds 2016 National TT Champion by Cycling Shorts

Haley Simmonds talks to CyclingShorts.cc writer / Photographer Chris Maher after taking the 2016 National TT Champion title in Stockton.

In the U23 Time Trial, Scott Davies [Team Wiggins] also defended his twenty-fifteen title beating Tao Geoghegen Hart [Axeon Hagens Berman CT] for Silver by nineteen seconds with Gabriel Cullaigh [100%ME] a further thirty seconds back off the pace.

  1.  40 Davies Scott Team Wiggins 44: 44:10.43
  2.  39 Geoghegan Hart Tao Axeon Hagens Berman CT 44:29.81 @9.38
  3.  34 Cullaigh Gabriel 100% ME 44:40.24 @29.81
  4.  35 Hetherington Ben Planet X – Northside Cycling 44:[email protected]
  5.  38 Baylis Thomas One Pro Cycling 44:53.39 @42.96
  6.  37 Shaw James Lotto Soudal U23 45:12.22 @01:01.8
  7.  12 Fry Joseph Pedal Heaven 45:24.97 @01:14.5
  8.  28 Kelly Jake Team Wiggins 45:42.33 @01:31.8
  9.  36 Stewart Mark 100% ME 45:54.37 @01:43.9
  10.  30 Latham Christopher Team Wiggins 45:54.60 @01:44.2
  1.  50 Hayley Simmonds Aerocoach 47:33.36
  2.  44 Claire Rose Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa 48:06.32  @0:32.96
  3.  47 Dame Sarah Storey Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa 48:12.47 @0:06.15
  4.  49 Emma Pooley 48:33.46 @0:20.99
  5.  45 Hannah Barnes Canyon – SRAM 49:29.28 @0:55.82
  6.  40 Julia Shaw 49:39.92 @0:10.64
  7.  48 Molly Weaver Liv-Plantur 49:53.32 @0:13.40
  8.  11 Elizabeth-Jane Harris Podium Ambition p/b Club La Santa 50:56.20 @1:02.88
  9.  9 Angela Hibbs Fusion RT Fierlan 51:03.12 @0:06.92
  10.  42 Abby-Mae Parkinson Servetto Footon 51:13.39 @0:10.27
  1.  40 Alex Dowsett Movistar Team 0:55:38.52
  2.  35 James Gullen Pedal Heaven 0:56:54.83
  3.  38 Ryan Perry Langdale Lightweights Racing Team 0:57:52.53
  4.  32 Peter Williams One Pro Cycling 0:58:15.36
  5.  26 Richard Handley One Pro Cycling 0:59:09.39
  6.  33 Samuel Harrison Team Wiggins 0:59:11.87
  7.  37 Lloyd Chapman Pedal Heaven 0:59:36.73
  8.  20 Ashley Cox CC Luton 0:59:45.70
  9.  36 Andrew Tennant Team Wiggins 0:59:59.87
  10.  34 Rhys Howells Richardsons-Trek RT 1:00:04.48

Numbers don’t win the race!

Most riders are obsessed with numbers in this Strava crazy world! We are always checking the data, the power, heart rate, time or speed for a session and obviously physical training is vitally important to becoming a successful road racer, but what about the other elements of racing that are often neglected?

 

Psychology

Can you manage your emotions, your thoughts, your pre race nerves, your confidence levels?

Professor Steve Peters rose to fame with his Chimp Paradox Mind Model and is credited with much of the success of British riders in the past few years.  Mental skills, like physical skills need time and effort to develop, how much time do you spend on them?

Simple things such as positive self talk to increase confidence and maintain focus, focused breathing techniques to control nerves and using imagery to visualise successful performances can make a significant difference.

Confidence also comes from setting SMARTER goals that include process goals. It is wonderful to have a goal of winning a specific race or completing a certain TT in a set time (an outcome goal), but often other factors outside your control influence these goals i.e. who else turns up for the race, how hard they have trained and the weather. You therefore need to set other goals or milestones that contribute to your overall goals for the season, or year. Ones that you are in control of, that will contribute to your long term goals and that you can be proud of achieving i.e. to have increased average cadence by X amount by X date, to have developed an effective warm up protocol by Spring or to have increased threshold power by X watts by X date, to have learnt to corner effectively in a bunch by Summer or to increase speed over a known course by X%. Achieving these milestones will bring confidence as you see your progress.

Pre race I recommend all my riders follow a set routine that works for them, I even ask them to write it down and plan it out along with a list of kit they need. This ensures there are no last minute panics. Using a set pre race routine and set warm up enables a rider to control their anxiety. Always following the same process allows an athlete to get into the racing mindset. The British Cycling 20 minute warm is perfect for most events.

During a race the mental skill most required is concentration and the ability to remain focussed at all times, a lapse in concentration could result in disaster. Post race it is vital to identify not just the areas for improvement, but all the things that went well. Try identifying 10 things that you did well each race i.e. did you complete a successful warm up, did you start in a good position, did you maintain a good position in the bunch, where you aware of the attacks, did you find a safe wheel to follow, did you hydrate well etc etc. Look for the positives; this is where confidence comes from!

 

Technical Skills

Racing Skills Session for 700cc at Hillingdon Cycle Circuit

Racing Skills Session for 700cc at Hillingdon Cycle Circuit

Last year the Surrey League took the decision to make it compulsory for riders to attend two accredited race training sessions if they were planning to race in the league as a novice/Cat 4 racer. This year the South East Road Race League has done the same and it seems likely that other race organisers will follow suit.

These sessions cover a variety of technical skills for racing before progressing to some tactical skills including mock racing which is followed by a classroom session to discuss racing and training.

Having run a few of these sessions now, including some women’s only sessions, I truly believe riders at all levels can benefit from them. In the outside session we build the confidence to ride in close proximity to other riders, leaning on other riders, touching other riders, being in a bunch and moving through a bunch of riders.

Cornering in a bunch is very different to being cornering solo and being able to choose your line. Sessions like this give the opportunity to practise at speed in a safe environment. British Cycling has a great series of videos called Race Smart including one on Cornering in a Bunch which are well worth a look.

Women Only Session at Redbridge Cycle Circuit

Women Only Session at Redbridge Cycle Circuit

Technique for mass starts and sprint finishes are covered and practised; in a race you only get to do each of these once and they are not the sort of things you should be practising with your mates on the open road! Often the main area for improvement on the mass starts is being able to clip your second foot in quickly without looking down, this is simple to practise on every ride and can make a huge difference to both your confidence on the start line and to the start itself.

 

All riders enjoy working on their strengths, the things they naturally excel at, but identifying and dedicating time to our weaknesses will pay dividends come race day!

The Sprint for the Line!

The Sprint for the Line!

Knowledge really is power; do you know the demands of the races you are targeting? What is the circuit like? Is it a narrow circuit with tight corners, a wide circuit, an open road, is it hilly, where is the start/finish. If you are unable to ride the course or circuit pre race can you look at You Tube footage from previous races, look at Google Earth to get an idea of the layout, ask team mates or club mates what the circuit is like or even ask on social media. This will help you decide what skills you need to focus on most i.e. cornering or starts for town centre crits!

The excellent Race Smart videos cover everything from packing your bag to racing in high winds, but of course there is no substitute for getting out and practising so riders of all levels can benefit from this type of session.

 

Tactical Skills

Tactical skills are developed with experience, in your first few races really focus on observing the race, who did what, when and why? Where were the attacks? Was this a good place to attack? Did it work? Why? What happened in the race? How did you respond? How did others respond?

Watch other races live or on TV and see if you can work out what riders are doing and why? Observe how different tactics are used by individuals versus teams?

Then try some out! It is difficult to plan precisely, but have a strategy for the race or the course. Will you sit in the bunch and conserve energy as you know your strength is sprinting? Will you attack over the crest of a hill when other riders are easing off? Which attacks will you respond too? Where do attacks commonly happen on this circuit or course?

Early season races that are not your top priority for the year are good place to be brave and try out some tactics and see what might just work for you or your team.

So in 2016 will you develop your mental skills, your technical skills and your tactical skills alongside your physical training? You can bet the winners will be…….

2015 British Cycling National Track Championships Gallery & Report – Day 3

 

All images ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

A fourth gold medal for Katy Marchant as she secures both the Women’s 500m TT and the Women’s Team Sprint Titles on the final day of the British Track Championships in Manchester. Laura Trott wins the Women’s Scratch Race to add a third title. The Men’s Team Pursuit were dominated by 100% ME. Jason Kenny, Matt Crampton and Philip Hindes secure the Men’s Team Sprint Title, whilst 100% Me’s Mark Stewart takes the Men’s Scratch Race Title.   

 

Women’s Team Sprint Qualifying

(1)Katy Marchant North West Region C 33.942

Jessica Varnish North West Region C

 

(2)Shanaze Reade North West Region B 35.307

Laura Trott North West Region B

(3)Eleanor Richardson North West Region D 35.689

Helen Scott North West Region D

(4)Emma Baird Scotland A 36.503

Robyn Stewart Scotland A

(5)Sophie Capewell West Midlands Region 36.956

Deborah Capewell West Midlands Region

(6)Rebecca Dornan Scotland B 37.429

Jessica Lee Scotland B

(7)Laura Clode VC St Raphael 37.869

Madeline Moore VC St Raphael

Rachel Murray VC St Raphael

(8)Paige Nutton Swinnerton Cycles 38.092

Lauren Quenby Swinnerton Cycles

(9)Neah Evans Scotland Development A 38.336

Louise Haston Scotland Development A

(10)Lauren Davies East Midlands Region 39.283

Sasha Quarrington East Midlands Region

 

British National Track Championships | 2015 - Day 3Men’s 4000m Team Pursuit Qualifying

100% ME 4.11.009

Germain Burton 100% ME

Matthew Gibson 100% ME

Christopher Latham 100% ME

Oliver Wood 100% ME

 

Scotland Development 4.18.930

Peter Anderson Scotland Development

Tom Arnstein Scotland Development

Fraser Martin Scotland Development

Philip Trodden Scotland Development

 

The Nab Racing 4.19.226

Scott Burns The Nab Racing

Julian Pearson The Nab Racing

Alistair Rutherford The Nab Racing

Reece Wood The Nab Racing

 

Scotland Juniors 4.20.905

Andy Brown Scotland Juniors

Tom Chandler Scotland Juniors

Angus Claxton Scotland Juniors

Lewis Mulholland Scotland Juniors

 

Central Region 4.25.556

Michael Mottram Central Region

Daniel Bigham Central Region

Stephen Bradbury Central Region

George Clark Central Region

 

Southampton University RC 4.37.178

Thomas Key Southampton University RC

Charlie Leech Southampton University RC

Scott Michaels Southampton University RC

Rhys Thomas Southampton University RC

 

VC St Raphael 4.42.954

Benedict Elliott VC St Raphael

Frank Kilsby VC St Raphael

Jason Streather VC St Raphael

Rowan Elliott VC St Raphael

 

5th -7th Places

Central Region 4.23.572

Michael Mottram Central Region

Daniel Bigham Central Region

Stephen Bradbury Central Region

George Clark Central Region

 

Southampton University RC 4.33.781

Thomas Key Southampton University RC

Charlie Leech Southampton University RC

Scott Michaels Southampton University RC

Rhys Thomas Southampton University RC

 

VC St Raphael 4.41.514

Benedict Elliott VC St Raphael

Frank Kilsby VC St Raphael

Jason Streather VC St Raphael

Rowan Elliott VC St Raphael

 

Men’s Team Sprint Qualifying

(1)North West Region A 44.245

Matthew Crampton North West Region A

Philip Hindes North West Region A

Jason Kenny North West Region A

 

(2)Black Line 1 46.039

Peter Mitchell Black Line 1

Matthew Roper Black Line 1

Thomas Scammell Black Line 1

 

(3)Scotland 46.724

Jonathan Biggin Scotland

Jack Carlin Scotland

Jonathan Mitchell Scotland

 

(4)Sportcity Velo 48.059

Jack Payne Sportcity Velo

Matthew Rotherham Sportcity Velo

Thomas Rotherham Sportcity Velo

 

(5)SES Racing 48.359

Miles Annon SES Racing

Ryan Owens SES Racing

Matthew Turner SES Racing

 

(6)Glasgow Sprint TCT 48.840

Jamie Alexander Glasgow Sprint TCT

Christopher Barr Glasgow Sprint TCT

Andrew Louis Glasgow Sprint TCT

 

(7)VC St Raphael 49.228

David Heald VC St Raphael

Andrew Leveton VC St Raphael

Barney Storey VC St Raphael

 

(8)Para-T 51.414

Jon-Allan Butterworth Para-T

Jody Cundy Para-T

Louis Rolfe Para-T

 

(9)Black Line 2 52.228

Jack Plumley Black Line 2

James Brightwell Black Line 2

Mark Wiffen Black Line 2

 

(10)North West Region B 53.267

Nick Caton North West Region B

James Roberts North West Region B

Richard Youle-Grayling North West Region B

 

Women’s 500m Time Trial Finals

Gold: Katy Marchant (Unattached) 34.496

Silver: Victoria Williamson (VC Norwich) 34.743

Bronze: Eleanor Richardson (Edinburgh RC) 35.960

 

Men’s 4000m Team Pursuit Finals

Gold: 100% ME (Germain Burton, Jake Kelly, Mark Stewart and Oliver Wood)

Silver: Scotland Development (Peter Anderson, Tom Arnstein, Philip Trodden and Ruari Yeoman)

Bronze: Scotland Juniors (Andy Brown, Tom Chandler, Angus Claxton and Lewis Mulholland)

 

British National Track Championships | 2015Women’s 30Km Points Race

Laura Trott claims her third title of the Championships in a thrilling duet with Katy Archibald to win the Women’s Points Race.

Sarah Storey started the race off trying to gain a lap in the early stages of the race, but it wasn’t long before Trott and Archibald joined her. Building up to the first sprint at 110 laps remaining, it was Archibald that collected the five points, then Trott, then Manon Lloyd and Lucy Shaw.

Not content with sitting up, Archibald applies the pressure, Trott and Emily Kay join her. The three have clear air. Archibald takes the second sprint ahead of Trott, then Kay. Sarah Storey leads the chase collecting her first point of the race.

Storey continues in pursuit mode for the next sprint at 90, collects maximum points and continues to gain a lap.

Approaching the next sprint, Storey sets off again, but Trott, Archibald and Kay are in pursuit. Kay takes five points at 80, Trott, Archibald and Manon Lloyd.

Storey attacks once more, Archibald chases down with Trott close behind, It’s Trott that takes her first sprint, with Archibald second, 70 laps remaining. Archibald leads by one point 55, Trott second 54. Kay sits in third place with 49 points.

Trott and Archibald extend their gap after the sprint, Kay and Lloyd are left to chase.

Trott gets the next sprint 60, from Archibald and moves into the lead for the first time. It’s Trott that gets the next sprint too, but not after a challenge from Storey once more who settles for fourth behind Lloyd.

With Trott, Storey and Kay taking the next sprints and both Storey and Kay lapping the field whilst doing so, Archibald didn’t have enough fuel in the tank to get past Trott. Trott took the penultimate sprint and the final bunch sprint, Gabriella Shaw had escaped the pack in the final few laps and stayed ahead crossing the line firstly.

Trott 100, Archibald 88, Kay 80 & Storey 73 points.

Women’s 30Km Points Race Result

Gold: Laura Trott (Matrix Fitness)

Silver: Katie Archibald (Pearl Izumi Sports Tours International)

Bronze: Emily Kay (Team USN)

 

British National Track Championships | 2015 - Day 3Men’s team sprint

Gold: North West Region A (Matthew Crampton, Philip Hindes and Jason Kenny) 44.001

Silver: Black Line (Peter Mitchell, Matthew Roper and Thomas Scammell) 46.763

Bronze: Sportcity Velo (Jack Payne, Matthew Rotherham and Thomas Rotherham) 46.242

 

Women’s team sprint

Gold: North West Region C (Katy Marchant and Jessica Varnish) 33.424

Silver: North West Region B (Shanaze Reade and Victoria Williamson) 34.392

Bronze: North West Region D (Eleanor Richardson and Helen Scott) 35.257

 

Men’s Scratch Race

Gold: Mark Stewart (100% ME)

Silver: Jonathan Dibben (Team Wiggins)

Bronze: Chris Latham (100% ME)

British National Track Championships 2015 – Day 1

All images ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

 

25 September 2015

2015 BRITISH CYCLING NATIONAL TRACK CHAMPIONSHIPS DAY ONE RESULTS ROUND-UP

Results from day one of competition at the National Cycling Centre in Manchester where Laura Trott and Andy Tennant took the individual pursuit titles, Katy Marchant won gold in the women’s sprint, Matt Crampton took gold in the men’s keirin, Sophie Thornhill and Helen Scott (pilot) took the para-cycling time trial BVI title and an inspirational Kadeena Cox won her first national para-cycling time trial title (C1-5).

 

Day 1 Afternoon Session

Women’s Sprint 200m Flying Lap

Defending Champion Jessica Varnish starts her Sprint Jersey with the second fastest 200m Flying Lap whilst Katy Marchant leads the way with a 11.030. Up-coming Victoria Williamson sets a 11.270 behind former Double World Champion Becky James at 11.294.

The top twelve riders qualify to the next heat.

Katy Marchant Unattached 11.030
Jessica Varnish Team V-Sprint Racing 11.149
Victoria Williamson VC Norwich 11.270
Rebecca James Abergavenny RC 11.294
Rachel James Abergavenny RC 11.585
Sophie Capewell Lichfield City CC 11.616
Anna Newton Unattached 11.877
Eleanor Richardson Edinburgh RC 11.961
Ellie Coster Team USN 12.036
Robyn Stewart Glasgow Sprint TCT 12.143
Lauren Quenby Swinnerton Cycles 12.186
Neah Evans Glasgow Sprint TCT 12.215

Neah Evans takes an impressive first heat against Katy Marchant.
Jessica Varnish takes heat two against Lauren Quenby
Victoria Williamson takes heat three against Robyn Stewart
Ellie Coster takes heat four against Becky James
Rachel James takes heat five against Eleanor Richardson
Anna Newton takes heat six against Sophie Capewell

Katy Marchant re-joins the event the harder way, through the repechage.
Eleanor Richardson also re-joins the event through the repechage heat two.

The biggest upset of the afternoon was defending Sprint Champion Jessica Varnish losing out to Katy Marchant in the quarter finals.

 

Men’s 4000m Pursuit Qualifying

Andrew Tennant (Team WIGGINS) qualifies quickest in the final heat of the 4000m IP setting a time of 4.23.908, beating Germain Burton 100% ME by almost a second. Team mate Jon Dibben qualifies third with Mathew Gibson fourth.

Andrew Tennant Team WIGGINS 4.23.908
Germain Burton 100% ME 4.24.751
Jon Dibben Team WIGGINS 4.25.754
Matthew Gibbson 100% ME 4.27.728
Oil Wood 100% ME 4.28.241
Mark Stewart 100% ME 4.29.022
Daniel Bigham Beeline Bicycles RT 4.33.382
Chris Latham 100% ME 4.33.819
Jake Kelly 100% ME 4.34.469
Angus Claxton Glasgow Cycle Team 4.35.042

 

Women’s 300m Pursuit Qualifying

Defending Women’s 3000m IP Champion Katie Archibald (Pearl Izumi Sports Tours Int’l) qualifies quickest in the final heat for Gold play-off in a time of 3.31.327. Laura Trott set the bench mark in the previous heat taking three seconds off Archibald’s Team Mate Ciara Horne, whom had led at that point. Joanna Rowsell Shand will join them for the bronze medal playoff later this evening.

Katie Archibald Pearl Izumi Sports Tours Int’l 3.31.327
Laura Trott Matrix Fitness 3.32.505
Ciara Horne Pearl Izumi Sports Tours Int’l 3.35.579
Jo Rowsell Shand Pearl Izumi Sports Tours Int’l 3.35.941
Elinor Barker Matrix Fitness 3.37.892
Emily Kay Team USN 3.40.736
Dame Sarah Storey Pear Izumi Sports Tours Int’l 3.41.370
Manon Lloyd Team USN 3.43.227

 

Para Cycling Time Trials

The first podiums of the event were the Mixed Para Cycling C1-5 Standing Start Time Trial Category.

Collecting the Gold Medal and the new National Champion was Kadeena Cox, FC2, Unattached setting a factored time of 1.00.534. It wasn’t what she expected, telling the audience afterwards.

Silver went to Lauren Booth, YBFC4, Carnac-Planet X with a factored time of 1.07.602.

Bronze went to Rik Waddon, MC3, Para-T with a factored time of 1.10.193

 

C1-5 Finals Result

Gold: Kadeena Cox (Unattached) 40.591 (factored time 1.00.534)
Silver: Lauren Booth (Carnac-Planet X) 41.152 (factored time 1.07.602)
Bronze: Rik Waddon (Para T) 1.15.185 (factored time 1.10.193)

The second podium of the event before breaking for the evening session was the Mixed Para Cycling BVI Standing Start 1000m Time Trial Category.

World Champions Sophie Thornhill and her pilot Helen Scott, both Performance Cycle Coaching collected the Gold Medal to become the new National Champions. Setting a factored time of 1.00.265. Both girls had given it all they had to clinch the title, afterwards they lay on the floor giggling with joy!

Silver Medal went to World Champions Neil Fachie and his pilot Peter Mitchell, both Black Line, setting a factored time of 1.02.631.

Bronze Medal went to Laura Cluxton, Road And Road Cycles and her pilot Lyndsay Carson, Team Thompson Cycles with a factored time of 1.07.710

 

BVI Mixed 1000m Finals Result

Gold: Sophie Thornhill and Helen Scott (pilot) (Performance Cycle Coaching) 1.08.709 (factored time 1.00.265)
Silver: Neil Fachie and Peter Mitchell (pilot) (Black Line) 1.02.631 (factored time 1.02.631)
Bronze: Laura Cluxton (Road and Road Cycles) and Lyndsey Carson (pilot, Team Thomson Cycles) 1.17.198 (factored time 1.07.710)

 

Day 1 Evening Session

3000m Women’s IP Finals

In a thrilling Gold play-off, Laura Trott, Matrix accelerated in the dying laps to reclaim the Women’s 3000m Pursuit Title from last years title holder Katie Archibald.

Ciara Horne, Pearl Izumi Sports Tours Int’l rode into the Bronze Medal position against team-mate Joanna Rowsell Shand.

Gold: Laura Trott (Matrix Fitness) 3.32.759
Silver: Katie Archibald (Pearl Izumi Sports Tours International) 3.33.065
Bronze: Ciara Horne (Pearl Izumi Sports Tours International) 3.37.262

Joanna Rowsell Shand
Elinor Barker
Dame Sarah Story
Emily Kay
Manon Lloyd

 

4000m Men’s IP Finals

Timing his effort to perfection, Andrew Tennant, Team WIGGINS took the Men’s National 4000m Pursuit Title. Leading the race for Gold through most of the session, Germain Burton, 100% ME looked like he was going to pull the title out of the bag, but Tennant showed his experience, kept his nerve, and turned the gas up the closing laps to become the new National Champion.

Gold: Andrew Tennant (Team Wiggins) 4.23.583
Silver: Germain Burton (100% ME) 4.27.209
Bronze: Jonathan Dibben (Team Wiggins) 4.24.906

Matt Gibson
Oli Wood
Mark Stewart
Daniel Bigham
Chris Latham

 

Men’s Keirin Finals

Matt Crampton, Unattached, takes the 2015 Keirin title.

Matt had sat in the middle of the pack on the approach to the final lap and went around the outside to clinch the title from Oliva and Thomas Rotherham. Jason Kenny took fourth, Matt Rotherham fifth and Jon Mitchell sixth.

The Keirin had got off to a good start for Matt Crampton winning the first heat of the day. He then went on to win the semis too.

A huge crash in the second heat of the first round, saw four riders flying through the air bringing their Championship dreams to an end. Luckily they all got up from the track.

Gold: Matt Crampton (Unattached)
Silver: Lewis Oliva (Team USN)
Bronze: Thomas Rotherham (Sportcity Velo)

 

Women’s Sprint Finals

Katy Marchant claims her first National Sprint Title. Winning the European Title earlier on this year has build on that success, beating former double World Champion Becky James, Abergavenny RC in both rounds.

Victoria Williamson, VC Norwich beat Eleanor Richardson for the Bronze Medal in two straight sets.

Former National Sprint Champion Jess Varnish, Team V-Sprint Racing won the minor finals for fifth followed by Rachel James, sixth, Sophie Capewell, seventh and Neah Evans, eighth.

Gold: Katy Marchant (Unattached)
Silver: Becky James (Abergavenny RC)
Bronze: Victoria Williamson (VC Norwich)

Press Release – Racing Chance Foundation and Team 22 – 2017 and beyond

The Racing Chance Foundation and Team 22 are very pleased to announce a joint venture that will enhance the opportunities available to Under 23 and Junior Women riders within the UK.

A true pathway for success

From 2017, Team 22 will act as the Under 23 and Junior development squad for The Racing Chance Foundation (“Racing Chance”). This will allow Racing Chance to offer a complete development pathway for riders. This pathway will cover and support progression for riders from novice-focused intro- to-racing days and race skills development sessions for more advanced riders, through to a development squad (Team 22). Then beyond that, there will be the opportunity to race overseas through organised racing trips, as introduced and run by Racing Chance in 2015.

 

(c) Dan Monaghan Photography

(c) Dan Monaghan Photography

Talent identification and development

Within this partnership structure, Team 22 will continue to operate as a separate team and will be supported as it is now through commercial sponsorship, thus ensuring that there is no drain on existing Racing Chance funds. Riders joining Team 22 will be supported through its existing structure of coaching and financial support, but will also have access to the additional opportunities available from Racing Chance. Both Racing Chance and Team 22 are already putting in place a scouting network that will allow us to identify and offer places to some of the brightest young bike racing talent in the UK, providing opportunities to riders not on an existing development pathway.

 

(c) Dan Monaghan Photography

(c) Dan Monaghan Photography

What does this mean?

Team 22 owner Colin Batchelor says: “This is an amazing opportunity for everyone involved in this partnership. For us, it’ll be great to be part of a true development pathway and the level of support and opportunity we will be able to offer riders is something everyone involved in Team 22 is very excited about.”

Racing Chance Foundation Chair Heather Bamforth says “By creating an alternative road based pathway, we hope to be able to encourage Youth A riders to continue racing once they leave that age category by easing the transition into road racing with the junior and senior women. This development can only be seen as a positive for all people who are keen to see numbers participating increasing, and the Foundation hopes to offer training opportunities for all young women in the junior and under-23 categories regardless of whether they go on to race for Team 22.”

 

Team 22 smll-43

(c) Dan Monaghan Photography

 

About RacingChanceFoundation.com

The Racing Chance Foundation is a charity registered in England and Wales which was set up in April 2014 to provide an alternative pathway for women in competitive cycling.  They focus on road-based events, providing training and racing opportunities from novice through to elite level.

Racing Chance have membership opportunities available, where you can join for £5.  They will have a membership area up and running on their website shortly, but in the meantime, they are affiliated with British Cycling, you can sign up here.  Not only will you be supporting a charity dedicated to women’s cycling, but the Foundation is also affiliated to Cycling Time Trials and the Manchester & District Ladies Cycling Association for those of you who want to have a go at time trialling but are not sure about what it is all about.  So, whether you are already a member of a club or are currently riding on your own, why not sign up today?  Men are welcome as much as women! In return you get exclusive access to their members and coaching area on the website (launching shortly), a discount off all purchases in the Racing Chance Shop for the duration of your membership (more benefits to be announced soon). You can also book and attend the charity’s heavily subscribed training events, for details of the latest events click here or why not visit the Racing Chance Foundation shop to purchase some stylish race kit, all profits from sales are put straight back in to the charity to provide more cycling opportunities for members. Even the smallest donation make a huge difference.

The Racing Chance Foundation is a not for profit registered charity: 1156835.

Women’s Cycling – Planning Ahead

Now that the Women’s National Road Series is over for another year, many people will be thinking about what team they want to be riding for next season, so given that the better teams tend to be sorted by August, I thought it would be helpful to give those of you who might not have gone through the process before some guidance.

Where do I start?

Firstly, a good starting point is to think about what you actually want to achieve next season and whether you have all the “tools” available to you to be able to do so.  For example, it might be something relatively simple like a need to improve on your base fitness over winter to help you be more competitive in the higher level races, or it might be something more difficult, like a lack of time and/or money.

Many people (male and female) make the mistake of applying a scatter gun approach to racing at the start of the season (a large factor being a plethora of races, on the most part circuit races, at the beginning of the season, which peter out later in the year), which doesn’t necessarily help with your fitness or your bank balance!

British Cycling National Road Race Championships 2015

BC National Road Race Championships 2015 – Image ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

So, what do you need to think about?

Time you have available

If you are at school, college, work or have kids, you will have other commitments other than riding your bike.  That also means that you are likely to have a finite number of holidays available too – so think about what you intend to do in those holidays, and how many you are prepared to spend at bike races (everybody needs a break from work otherwise you get burn out).

You also need to think about how many hours a week you can dedicate to riding a bike – if you have a training plan that involves 20 hours a week on the bike, is it reasonable to think that you can achieve that?  Or is 6 hours a week more likely?  You can still achieve results on the latter, you just have to make sure that you are doing quality training.

Matrix Fitness GP 2015 | Motherwell - Round 2

Matrix Fitness GP 2015 | Motherwell – Round 2 – Image ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

Cost of racing

Every time you race, you pay an entry fee.  If you are keen to do more road races than anything else, these tend to be more expensive due to the nature of the infrastructure required for the race to go ahead.  If you are likely to be tight on cash (which most people are), and you have to cover the costs of your own entry fee, decide in advance which races  you intend to target (the cost of races disappears once the event has happened but if you earmark £30 for each National Series event, and £20 – £25 for every other event, you won’t be far off), how much you will need to spend to get there (including travelling, accommodation and food) and make those events your “target events”, you will go some way to making sure you budget for them accordingly.

Once you’ve earmarked how much it is going to cost you to get to the most important events in your calendar, then work backwards based on how much cash you think you are going to have available and look at local events first, then further afield.  Remember, you don’t have to enter all women’s races if there isn’t one available.  You can enter men’s events, but you have to be pretty quick because they fill up rather fast.

Women's Tour De Yorkshire 2015 - ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

Women’s Tour De Yorkshire 2015 – ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

Your Location

If you live in a region where there isn’t much racing available for women, you have two choices: you either do something about it (by persuading organisers of men’s events to host a women’s race at the same time) or you have to travel.  Most people have to travel at some point because races tend to be in the middle of nowhere.  If you don’t have access to a car, the likelihood is that you will struggle to get to races unless you team up with someone else to get there or you get there using public transport, which might involve a stay over.  If you’re not overly keen on those two options, you will need to look at the racing on offer in your locality and amend your season’s objectives accordingly.

Cheshire Classic 2015 - BC Women's Road Series Rnd 2

Cheshire Classic 2015 – BC Women’s Road Series Rnd2 – Image ©www.chrismaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

Do you need to be on a team?

The short answer is “no”.  However, some riders prefer to be on a team, so it’s each to their own.  But, having said that, if you do want to be on a sponsored team, and you are considering applying to teams, make sure that you are honest with yourself about what you can give.  Being on a team is a privileged position to be in, especially those where it includes the provision of clothing and equipment.  You need to ensure that you can do justice to yourself and your potential sponsors before applying.  You also need to think about the commitment level (see above) as if you’re limited on the number of holidays that you have, only you will know whether riding every Tour Series or driving the length of the country for National Series races is the best use of your time.

Notwithstanding the above, Tanya Griffiths wrote an article for us last year about applying for a team place, which you can access here.

Alexandra Women's Tour Of The Reservoir 2015 - Women's Tour Seri

Alexandra Women’s Tour Of The Reservoir 2015 – Image ©www.ChrisMaher.co.uk / CyclingShorts.cc

Perspective is important

Ultimately, the majority of racing cyclists in this country participate because it’s their hobby.  That means it’s supposed to be fun and enjoyable (although it is hard work too).  Focus on what you want to achieve, make sure your objectives or goals are SMART goals (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely) and just enjoy riding your bike.

If you do decide to go ahead with applying to sponsored teams next season, we wish you the very best of luck and hope that everything works out for you.

 

Check out Heathers previous guides:

Race Tactics – It’s More Than Just A Lead Out

 

Click below to read:
Part One – Where Do I Start?
Part Two – What Do I Enter?
Part Three – What training should I do?
Part Four – Practice! Practice! Practice!
Part Five – Are You Ready To Race?
Part Six – Race Day
Part Seven – Circuit Racing

 

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