Rees rides to dream finish at the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100

Prudential RideLondon 2014
Rees rides to dream finish at the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100
A desire to raise money for charity drove Ian Rees to be first across the line at the end of the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 this morning, completing a journey of recovery for the 43-year-old Bristol-based diabetic who was inspired by watching last year’s event.
Twelve months ago the former pro stood leaning on his crutches beside The Mall watching the first ever Prudential RideLondon sportive and promised himself that he would lead the mass riders under the finish gantry in 2014 to raise money and the profile of diabetes research.
After 86 of the hardest rain-drenched miles he’s ever ridden, Rees achieved his dream with the aid of his Bristol Dymag TID clubmates Paul Merryweather and Matthew Franklin, and believes his Herculean efforts will bring in some much-needed funds for the diabetes charity JDRF.
“I couldn’t do it last year because I broke my leg, but I watched it with people from the charity and told them that I would be first across the line this year to raise their profile,” said Rees, his mud-splattered face breaking into a smile of pure relief.
“Here I am a year on, and I did it. I can’t believe it. That was the hardest ride I’ve had since I was a pro in France in the 1990s.”
Rees, who’s never done a sportive before, set up the Dymag club with Merryweather to raise money for diabetes research two years ago after being forced to abandon his pro cycling career when he was diagnosed with the condition.
Prudential RideLondon 2014“This is what we really wanted to do,” said Merryweather, who followed Rees safely across the line at the head of a 60-strong bunch of early-finishing sportive riders.”
“I helped Ian set up the team two years ago so this was all about getting him home first and giving JDRF some profile. So it’s mission accomplished; it’s all quite inspirational.”
The group had a plan to stay near the front of the pack, avoiding as far as possible any problems caused by the adverse weather, and were full of praise for the organisers’ decision to shorten the 100-mile route by 14 miles, cutting out the potentially treacherous climbs up and down Box Hill and Leith Hill.
Prudential RideLondon 2014“We worked so well as a team,” said Rees. “The rain and the speed we were going at the front made it so hard.”
“But it was such a good decision to cut out the hills. I hit a cat’s eye at one point and nearly came off, and there were a few crashes, so I’m really glad they took the hills out because coming down Box Hill or Leith Hill would’ve been deadly.”
“RideLondon have done an absolutely brilliant job. The organisation is as good as a pro race on the continent. I was so impressed, they should do these all over the country. I will do it again next year, definitely.”
Nicola Roberts and Bella Leach were impressed too. The two London friends rode the route together and crossed the line side-by-side, the first women to complete the sportive.
“It was wet but it was great fun,” said Roberts, a member of the Dulwich Paragon club. “It wasn’t too windy so you could still ride. Everyone was just getting on with it really and smiling and chatting.”
“Some of the corners and descents were quite sketchy but people were very considerate, slowing down and talking to each other.”
“I really enjoyed it, it was really good fun to just get out there and stretch the legs,” agreed Leach, a London Phoenix rider. “Nicola and I rode the whole way together so we wanted to cross the line together.”
“I’ve never been up Box Hill or Leith Hill and after today it feels like I’m destined to never ride them!”

Wiggle Honda’s Neil Towns was also among the early finishers, completing his second Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100.

“Riding at the front was really exciting,” he said. “I did the event last year. It was slighty damper than last year but still fantastic, still good riding. It’s a lovely bike ride that isn’t too challenging so you can just get out there and ride for the fun of it.”
“There were fewer supporters than last year but the ones who were out gave it some welly. I’ll definitely be back next year.”
“This event’s like the London Marathon for cyclists – if you can get a place you jump at it. A beautiful bike ride; the spirit of the London Olympics carries on.”
Ben Knapp backed up the other riders’ support for the shortened route, relishing a ride started by three world greats of women’s cycling: world and Olympic road race champion Marianne Vos, double Olympic track champion Laura Trott and multiple Paralympic gold medallist Dame Sarah Storey.
Ian Rees - post race

Ian Rees – post race

“It was a bit disappointing to have the route shortened but coming across the top of Newlands was pretty nasty so everyone understood why the organisers did it. It was the right decision,” said the Dulwich Paragon rider.”

“More than a quarter of Dulwich Paragon’s 600 members were riding today so it’s a really great event for everyone.”
“Having Marianne Vos, Sarah Storey and Laura Trott starting the ride was great. We set off feeling really inspired.”
All three women then rode the sportive themselves – Vos delighted to be back on the roads where she won Olympic gold two years ago.
“I’ve never done a ride as big as this; it was really something special,” said the Dutch rider who finished second in yesterday’s Prudential RideLondon Grand Prix.
“Just to ride with all these people and see everyone coming out riding, not caring about the rain was fantastic. It was great fun.”
“It was great to back on the roads of London 2012 and to see more than 20,000 out there too was fabulous. I saw quite a lot of them, I think, and everyone was taking care of themselves and each other.”

Press Release – Explore the World, One Ride at a Time

FM_Ride25_Image_3
RIDE25_LOGO_TAGLINEExplore the World, One Ride at a Time

Cycling around the world is a feat that many cyclists aspire to, but the time that such challenges require away from work and family make them impossible for most ordinary riders.
Ride25 is changing all that with a new flexible approach which allows riders to complete a round the world trip in 25 stages, completed months apart, one tour at a time. Individuals, groups, charities and companies are all invited to take part in however many stages they like, starting wherever they please, whether that be one stage through continental Europe or all 25 from the UK to Australia.
The concept has been set up by Rob Hamilton and John Readman – friends, cyclists and travel enthusiasts. The idea came after Hamilton organised a UK to Australia ride for the African children’s charity 1morechild. He experienced an incredible response to it, which sparked a curiosity between the pair as to how many more people would want to ride across the world if the challenge was made more accessible and flexible for them – the idea for Ride 25 was born.
FM_Ride25_Image_1“Ride25 is all about ordinary people who love to ride, being able to see the world from their bikes, and not having to put their life on hold to do it,” explained Readman.
All the legs have been carefully planned to accommodate seasoned riders through to new starters taking on their first very first cycling challenge, with support along the way for everyone. Every tour along the way comprises 4 days’ cycling, with each day involving between 70-100 miles in the saddle.
However – Ride25 isn’t just about cycling, it’s about the whole travelling adventure. Hamilton and Readman have handpicked the routes to take in the most interesting FM_Ride25_Image_2landscapes, sights and experiences across every country that Ride25 travels – it might not always make for the shortest routes from A to B, but they’re certainly the most exciting.
After each day’s sight-seeing in the saddle, there’s a relaxing environment at every base hotel to share the day’s experiences over a few drinks and an evening meal. It’s not a contest or a training camp, so riders can enjoy themselves – so much so that Ride25 even buys every rider’s first drink at the end of each day’s riding.
While all entrants are invited to use Ride25 as a platform to fundraise for charities close to their hearts, unlike many extreme cycling challenges, there’s no obligation to do so in order to take part – it’s all just about having fun.
Ride25 is donating a bike to an African community for every person that takes part in one of the 25 stages, through its corporate charity partner Re-Cycle, and the brand also raises up to £100,000 each year for the African children’s charity 1moreChild.
For more information please visit: http://www.ride25.com

The Herne Hill Velodrome Riband – Charity Challenge

Herne Hill Velodrome
 
The Herne Hill Velodrome Trust presents… 

  • Jon Snow throws down gauntlet to Russell Brand and Philip Hindes MBE, Olympic gold medalist 
  • Money raised will go towards securing the Velodrome’s future and riders’ nominated charities

 

The Herne Hill Velodrome Trust are delighted to announce the launch of the Herne Hill Velodrome Riband, a fundraising challenge pitching top cyclists against Twitter-savvy celebrities. The HHV Riband will be a high-profile fundraiser with 50 per cent of the funds raised going towards securing the Velodrome’s future and the other 50 per cent towards riders’ nominated charities.

So how does it work? Each rider, whether they’re Olympian Philip Hindes MBE or Jon Snow, broadcaster and Channel 4 News presenter, will ride three laps of the 450m track at the Herne Hill Velodrome – from a standing start, they’ll have one windup lap, then two timed laps. The fastest lap will be their registered time.

And who will win? Well, it really could be anyone’s. That’s right, we haven’t mentioned the special twist – the person with the highest total ‘score’ will be announced as the winner. A person’s ‘score’ will be calculated by dividing each rider’s fundraising efforts by their fastest lap time. So, a ‘slow’ celebrity could out sprint an Olympian by raising more cash – an ingenious way for a celebrity to beat an Olympian.

#bicyclebulletin presenter Sophie Robehmed & Jon Snow selfie at the launch of the Herne Hill Velodrome Riband.

#bicyclebulletin presenter Sophie Robehmed & Jon Snow selfie at the launch of the Herne Hill Velodrome Riband.

The Riband announcement was made in the first episode of the #bicyclebulletin by Hillary Peachey, Chairman of the Herne Hill Velodrome Trust. The first challengers are avid cyclist, Jon Snow, Channel 4 News Anchor and Philip Hindes, Olympic cycling gold medal winner, who will both compete for the HHV Riband later in the year.

Talking to the #bicyclebulletin, Jon Snow said: “I will be riding for my charity New Horizon Youth Centre. I have more than 402,000 followers on Twitter so what I may lack in speed, I expect to more than compensate for through fundraising online. I believe dirty tricks are allowed so I will be calling on some old friends to help out.” And who would Snow like to be up against on the track? “I am very keen to challenge   @RustyRockets – Russell Brand.”

Philip Hindes said: “I will be riding for Team Herne Hill. I am one of the fastest men on the track in the UK so, although I don’t yet have 400,000 twitter followers like Jon, I am quietly confident I can give my rivals a run for their money! I also have one or two old friends in the right places. I am challenging my friend, Andy Tennant, Team GB cyclist.”

Up to nine riders will be invited to take part in the HHV Riband, which will commence later this year. Their laps will be broadcast online on the #bicyclebulletin’s website: www.bicyclebulletin.co.uk.

Herne Hill Velodrome patron, double Olympic gold medalist and nine times world champion track cyclist, Victoria Pendleton CBE, said: “May the best team win.”

Interested riders should contact Theodore Bird ([email protected]; +44 (0)7711 747 334). Don’t miss all the action – subscribe to the Bicycle Bulletin’s channels at www.bicyclebulletin.co.uk.

 

Herne Hill Velodrome

The Herne Hill Velodrome is one of the oldest tracks in the world. It was built in 1891 and used for the 1948 London Olympic Games. The Herne Hill Velodrome Trust is a registered charity working towards building a new pavilion on site to give riders, staff, volunteers and spectators the facilities they all deserve.  For more information please go to www.hhvt.org

 

New Horizon Youth Centre

Jon Snow is Chair of the New Horizon Youth Centre, a day centre for 16 to 24-year-olds in central London. The annual New Horizon’s Comedy Benefit, hosted by comedian Ed Byrne, will take place at the Shaw Theatre on June 2 2014, tickets available from Ticketmaster.

 

Interview with Joanna Rowsell MBE

Joanna Rowsell - Image ©Great Manchester Cycle

I caught up with recently crowned National Time Trial Champion Joanna Rowsell MBE to find out her plans for the next few months and her thoughts on the whirlwind of a year that brought her further success at the Olympic Games in London and her seamless transition to the road.

Heather chats to Jo Rowsell MBE - Image ©Fred BamforthJo was about to ride the Great Manchester Cycle ride. Launched in 2012, the first Great Manchester Cycle was a resounding success, with a staggering 7,000 riders taking up the challenge and this years event was even bigger. Lizzie Amitstead, who brought home Britain’s first medal of the Games last summer in the Women’s Road Race, along with former Olympic champion Rebecca Romero were among those to take part in the inaugural Great Manchester Cycle, with Armitstead describing the event as “a fantastic day out”. This year Jo got to experience the buzzing atmosphere, the olympic champion seemed to be thoroughly enjoying herself with her signature beaming smile visible at all times under her helmet.

Related links:
Joanna Rowsell MBE’s website
Follow Jo on Twitter @JoannaRowsell
Great Manchester Cycle’s website – Enter now for 2014!” Great Manchester Cycle’s website – Enter now for 2014!

 

 

‘L of a Bike Ride

Intoart Bicycle Tour

 

 

 

 

Intoart Bicycle Tour 2013
Liverpool – Liege – Lille – London
‘L of a bike ride – Solo 1000 mile charity cycle ride across Europe

Ian Ritchie will be cycling 1000 miles solo, across Europe in June – July 2013 to raise money for Intoart artists to travel and research in Europe. Intoart is a small artist-led visual arts organisation working with adults and young people with learning disabilities.

Enthused by the cycling boom that has swept the UK in recent years, Ian will be pedaling a 1000-mile route inspired by cycling prowess and artistic achievement.

‘Intoart is such a fantastic charity, I am always struck by the quality of the artwork made in the Intoart studio and how hard the artists work; these are tough times for small charities so I wanted to show my support by doing something which reflects the endeavor and drive of the artists.

Cycling across Europe will enable me to do this as well as fulfilling some boyhood ambitions.’ Ian Ritchie

Beginning on the same day as the Tour de France, Saturday 29 June 2013, at the iconic Tate Liverpool on the banks of the Mersey, Ian will take in the Marc Chagall exhibition before making his way through Eccleston, the home of Sir Bradley Wiggins – Tour de France and Olympic Gold medal winner 2012. He will then continue on to pick up the Way of the Roses route to York before travelling by ferry from Hull to Belgium and follow the Flanders Cycle Route heading for Ghent, the cycling capital of Europe.

Intoart Bicycle TourWhilst in Belgium, Ian will visit MADmusée in Liege, a gallery Intoart has a strong relationship with. It was here in 2011 that Intoart artists exhibited internationally as a group for the first time.

In 2012, MADmusée commissioned Intoart artist, Doreen McPherson, to create a portrait of British cycling star, Mark Cavendish for an exhibition that ran alongside the Tour de France.

Other highlights of the trip include: a visit to the LaM Museum in Lille to see Madge Gill works from the L’Aracine collection; stopping off for a beer in Leuven, home of the world’s largest brewing company; and cycling the route of the Paris- Roubaix one-day classic cycle race, in reverse.

Ian will be arriving in Paris with enough time to visit Brancusi’s Studio at the Centre Pompidou before seeing the Tour de France finish on Sunday 21 July in the French capital.

From Paris, Ian will follow the Avenue Verte cycling route to Dieppe and take the ferry to Newhaven. He will then take in Box Hill, part of the Olympic Road Race route, and onwards to London.

Ian will finish his epic 1000 mile ride at the Intoart Studio in Clapham, South London on Saturday 27 of July 2013 where he will share his adventures with the Intoart artists and enjoy a well deserved cup of tea.

It seemed a good idea to ride from Liege to London as a charity event. Since Ian lives near Liverpool and is now retired, it seemed a better idea to just get on his bike and ride from Liverpool via Liege and Lille to London – ‘L of a Bike Ride.

Clifton Wright (Intoart artist) met with Ian to find out more about the ride and you can read the full interview at: www.intoart.org.uk/studio/weblogs/studio/Blog.html.

www.twitter.com/IntoartBicycleT 

www.facebook.com/IntoartBicycleTour2013

Text: INTO13 £5 (or your amount) to 70070 (UK only)

Great Manchester Cycle

Following the resounding success of last year’s sell-out event, The Great Manchester Cycle returns on Sunday 30th June with 8,000 riders expected to take part. With just two weeks to go, the 52-mile distance is now full… places are still available for the 13 and 26-mile routes…. but they are going fast, so grab yours now!

Starting and finishing at Etihad Campus, the home of Manchester City FC, the 13-mile circuit offers riders the opportunity to pedal through the closed roads of Manchester city centre and take in the sights from a whole new perspective. The route includes landmarks such as Old Trafford, plus a stretch of the iconic Mancunian Way – a section of motorway normally off-limits to cyclists.

Jo Rowsell

Jo Rowsell

The ride caters for all abilities, from club cyclists to families wishing to take on the challenge together. Olympic Gold medallist, Joanna Rowsell, will be lining up with those taking on the 52-mile route to join what will be the UK’s biggest timed cycling event:

“Having spent a number of years living and training in Manchester, it’s great to see the Great Manchester Cycle returning for a second year as it’s such a fantastic event.” She continued: “Manchester is one of the best cities for sport and cycling in the UK, so to be able to explore roads on the safety of 13 miles of closed roads will be a really unique experience.

With an event village hosting cycle industry exhibitors, charity partners, entertainment and food concessions, the Great Manchester Cycle is set to be a great day out in one of the UK’s most passionate sporting cities.

Entry for each route will cost just £20 for adults and £5 for kids. Children aged 3-7 can take part in the 13-mile route for free, but will need to use either a tag-a-long bike or children’s bike trailer/seat.

For further information on the route, event details and how to enter please visit: www.greatcycle.org/.

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